How to find out which 802.11 (a/b/g/n) my MBP is running?

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by jman995x, Jun 23, 2010.

  1. macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2007
    #1
    Hello,

    I have a MBP that is a couple of years old.
    I wanted to know which of the 802.11 protocols it is enabled with, but can't seem to find that information on my machine.
    Where should I look?

    Thanks,

    Justin
     
  2. macrumors Penryn

    Eidorian

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2005
    Location:
    Cuidad de México
    #2
    Fire up System Profiler and look under Network -> Airport.
     
  3. macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #3
    That doesn't tell me anything on mine. You can go to Airport Utility > Wireless > Radio Mode: to tell what is enabled, but that doesn't tell you which is running at the moment.
    Picture 2.jpg
     
  4. macrumors Penryn

    Eidorian

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2005
    Location:
    Cuidad de México
    #4
    Really? I get hardware and firmware versions along with supported modes.

    Network Utility shows what modes are available as well.
     
  5. macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #5
    Nevermind... I was looking at System Preferences... not System Profiler! Brain Cramp! However, in System Profiler, I still don't see where it shows what mode (b/g/n) is enabled.
     
  6. macrumors Penryn

    Eidorian

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2005
    Location:
    Cuidad de México
    #6
    System Profiler and Network Utility both show what 802.11 modes are available.

    The best I've been able to come up with to know what mode you're actually in is to check the transmission rate in Network Utility or once again in System Profiler. 130 Mbits tends to imply you're working under 802.11n mode.

    If it's slower you're in 'g' and then down to 'b'.
     
  7. macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #7
    If the only indication is an inference from the transmission rate, that can easily be found by pressing Option while clicking the Airport icon on the Menu Bar. I thought there was something in SysProfiler that specifically stated which mode, like Airport Utility does.
     
  8. macrumors Penryn

    Eidorian

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2005
    Location:
    Cuidad de México
    #8
    I was wondering what key that was. I've tried Option before but it didn't seem to work until just now.

    Otherwise I believe the OP did ask what modes are available to them on their older MacBook Pro. System Profiler and Network Utility will both show if 'n' is supported or not.
     
  9. macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2010
    Location:
    Sweden
    #9
    Download iStumbler and your airport is capable of N according to your screenshot

    And when i look in system profiler -> airport it list at what protocol it´s connected with
     

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  10. macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #10
    Yes, the confusion on my part is their thread title asks which is running, but the body of the post asks which is enabled. Two different questions. By the way, is there a quick "cheat sheet" to use to infer from the transmit rate which is n, g, b, etc.?


    Yes, I know mine is capable of n, since I've selected n with b/g compatible. That means it will support n, g or b, depending on the devices on the network at any given time. What that doesn't tell me is which is currently in use. For example, I run on n when it's just my MBP, but if my wife connects her PC to the network, it drops to g, since hers doesn't support n. My System Profiler doesn't show a fraction of the information yours shows. I don't know if that's because you have iStumbler installed or not, but mine doesn't even show 802.11a/b/g/n.
    Picture 4.jpg
     
  11. macrumors Penryn

    Eidorian

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2005
    Location:
    Cuidad de México
    #11
    No worries. It happens to all of us.

    I happen to have it memorized at 130, 54, and 11 Mbits for (n, g, b) respectively. It takes a little brain work to interpret Wikipedia's table.
     
  12. thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2007
    #12
    OP, chiming back in.

    Sorry for the confusion between the Title and the body, but I guess since somebody mentioned it, I do want to know what the machine is capable of, and what it is currently transmitting at.

    I too have a very sparsely populated System Profiler > Airport Card reading....doesn't mention anything about 802.11.

    However, I followed one poster's advice to Opt + Airport and it states 130, so I guess I'm running "n" (which would obviously automatically include downmodes b/g).

    Thanks for all of the help.

    Best regards,

    Justin
     
  13. macrumors regular

    Joined:
    May 19, 2010
    #13
    Mine is 144...I guess that's N? I always wondered because I have an older generation Time Capsule.

    [​IMG]
     
  14. macrumors Penryn

    Eidorian

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2005
    Location:
    Cuidad de México
    #14
    72.2 * 2 = 144.4

    (shrug)

    I've been stuck at 130 Mbits since 2007 on the hardware I've used. Then again I don't spend that much on my network hardware. My first router was $10 after rebate and my current one was $29.
     
  15. macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2010
    Location:
    Sweden
    #15
    OK, i Have OS X 10.6, don´t know what you have and it isn´t affected by i Stumbler.

    OK, however your WiFi will go up and down in speed based on connected devices with n/b/g so don´t worry...
     
  16. macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #16
    I know that. I said exactly that in my 4th post in this thread. I'm not worried about anything. My WiFi works just fine. I know how to see what Radio Mode I have selected, as I mentioned in my 1st post. I know how to quickly determine my transmit rate, as I mentioned in my 3rd post.

    In attempting to answer the OP's question, I was looking for a simple way for the OP to determine what mode was currently in use, as their thread title asked. It appears that looking at the transmit rate is the only way to infer which mode is in use.
     
  17. macrumors Penryn

    Eidorian

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2005
    Location:
    Cuidad de México
    #17
    Tomato is fun for what it can tell you about your connectivity.
     

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