Howard wins Australian election

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by Wardofsky, Oct 9, 2004.

  1. Wardofsky macrumors 65816

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    #1
    For those who don't know, us Aussie's just had an election Saturday (9th).
    Unlike America and a few other countries, voting here is compulsory so this is one day where every goes out and puts a little opinion in.

    The two main candidates for Prime Minister were John Howard (existing PM) and Mark Latham, Howard's Liberal (Liberal is right winged) and Latham is Labor (ultimately left winged).

    So after a long night of televised counting with the repeated line of; "It's too early to call" the final verdict came in, Liberal won; 40.7% to Labors 38.2%

    To make this relevant for those not in Australia, it means that the few Aussie troops up in Iraq will stay in Iraq.

    [​IMG]
     
  2. zimv20 macrumors 601

    zimv20

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    #2
    am i to understand that domestic issues were more important to voters than the iraq issue?
     
  3. Wardofsky thread starter macrumors 65816

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    #3
    Basically, everyone was fearing raised interest rates if Latham came into power, but most people don't realize that the interest rate level can't really be controlled.
    But the Iraq war was still important, many lefts believed that all we were doing was sucking up to Dubya for benefits such as the Free Trade Agreement, but the FTA only really benefits the US and kinda screws us.

    This election was called early, most probably before the US one; because if Kerry won then Howard would have a harder time getting a good message through.
     
  4. broken_keyboard macrumors 65816

    broken_keyboard

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    #4
    For those who don't understand the party names,
    Liberal Party = Republicans
    Labor Party = Democrats

    So in other words the Republicans who supported the war got reelected with an increased majority. Take that terrorists! Aussies stand up for what they believe in.
     
  5. zimv20 macrumors 601

    zimv20

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    #5
    low interest rates, i'm told.
     
  6. solvs macrumors 603

    solvs

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    #6
    From what I've read, of the ~900 Aussie troops in Iraq, none had been killed in combat. I pray none do. The economy was more important it seems. Terrorism still a looming threat, but less so. Even then, the race was mighty close for those thinking this is a Bush victory. Here in the States we are afraid of direct attacks and our economy sucks. It's going to be much tougher for the current administration.
     
  7. aus_dave macrumors regular

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    #7
    Just to clarify, it's a Liberal-National Party coalition, and the Nationals captured 5.8% of the primary vote in their own right. So the result wasn't as close as the figures above might suggest.

    It's a different system to the US - more info here for the political buffs :D.
     
  8. Wardofsky thread starter macrumors 65816

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    #8
    Amongst other things, switch on TV a few weeks ago and you'll be pounded with "Healthcare services", "Cheaper Medicare", "Lower taxes".
    All words, nothing more.

    People are more worried about money than human rights, social divides and countries getting bombed.

    True, forgot to mention that.
    At least most of Victoria voted ALP :p
    It seems that the majority of the Senate is controlled by a Family First fellow.
     
  9. Blue Velvet Moderator emeritus

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    Jul 4, 2004
    #9
    Question is: with another term of Howard what does this mean for the republican movement?

    A few years ago, there was a referendum to replace the current constitutional arrangement with another but this failed, narrowly.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------------
    (For anyone who doesn't know: Loosely speaking, Australia is still part of the English constitutional monarchy. The highest constitutional post is the Governor-General, then the Queen.)

    Apologies to any Aussies if I've got that wrong...
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------

    I take an interest as a Kiwi 'cos we won't jump until Australia does.
     
  10. Thomas Veil macrumors 68020

    Thomas Veil

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    #10
    Thanks for explaining that. I'm not sure everyone is familiar with their designations.

    Well, Rush Limbaugh will certainly be crowing a lot on Monday or Tuesday. He's been whining about the fact that Kerry's sister has been down there campaigning against Howard. (Apparently she travels the world on behalf of liberal causes. Before this, she was in Canada trying to get Americans living there to send in their absentee ballots. Good for her!)
     
  11. DJY macrumors 6502a

    DJY

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    Canberra AUST
    #11
    I for one am glad Howard was returned...

    Whilst I'm not a huge fan of his personally, I like Latham even less!
    I don't personally believe that Labor have the depth, experience, knowledge, or stability yet...

    There were a range of domestic issues I personally believe that were paramount to this election. I do acknowledge though that the Latham line of "bring the troops home by Christmas" probably did sway some voters.

    There are alot of Defence personnel, who were not convinced with much of Labor's new positions, and Townsville (a city in the far north of the state of Queensland) that has one of our largest army bases, sent that message clearly I thought!

    A big difference for many readers here is that in America, it is quite a public thing who you are voting for - or which party you prefer. In Australia, for some, it is almost rude, or offensive, too personal to ask who you are going to vote for...

    I have historically been a Liberal voter - although this weekend coming - in the local Australian Capital Territory election (like a state election) I will be voting Labor. Here the Liberals lack the experience and depth, and like Latham, the ACT Liberals are led by someone who I personally don't like or rate.
     
  12. solvs macrumors 603

    solvs

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    #12
    That's the problem we have too. Most of us don't really like Kerry, though he is starting to seem less douche-y to me, but we strongly dislike Bush. You think with it being this close, one of them would get the idea. But they seem to be relying on people hating the other one enough to get elected.
     
  13. daggle macrumors newbie

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    Oct 20, 2004
    #13
    I think you might be mistaken - http://vtr.aec.gov.au/StateResults-12246-VIC.htm

    I'm not too sure I agree. A change to the Australian Constitution requires the support of a Majority of Australians in a majority of States. The republic questions failed to achieve a majority vote in a single State - http://www.aec.gov.au/_content/how/newsfiles/news87.htm

    In any event, for what it's worth I voted No the question of an Australian Republic and am an habitual Liberal voter...
     

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