Huh?: iPhoto 5 just did a pop-up ad for iLife '06!

Discussion in 'Mac Apps and Mac App Store' started by Preacher85, Jan 29, 2006.

  1. Preacher85 macrumors member

    Preacher85

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    #1
    Yep, this just made me a bit upset. I launch iLife '05, and see a pop-up ad for iLife '06. This is low, Steve, very low. I don't like getting ads when I am trying to use the software I already paid you for! Yet I still love the products. Must be the RDF.

    Note: I blurred out pics of family, friends, etc. Please respect it.

    [​IMG]
     
  2. nichos macrumors 6502

    nichos

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    #2
    Yeah, I agree, that's border line adware. I know theres an option to uncheck to nagging, but it shouldn't be calling home! Anyone know if you can tell it never to check for updates, before this window comes up?
     
  3. Glenn Wolsey macrumors 65816

    Glenn Wolsey

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    #3
    Yep, I have heard this has happened to a few other users. I'm not happy, its in your face advertising by Apple we cant do anything to prevent.
     
  4. me_94501 macrumors 65816

    me_94501

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  5. jamdr macrumors 6502a

    jamdr

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    #5
    Hey I don't think it's malicious at all. Most people who use Macs aren't going to know when the iLife software gets updated or why they should bother upgrading. This is just a quick little message (that you can easily disable) that tells the customer there is updated version of the software they are using, and the things that it improves upon. I think that's good to know, personally. It's like a public service announcement :cool:
     
  6. EricNau Moderator emeritus

    EricNau

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    #6
    I totally agree.


    There are many people who want to know that there is an update. Most software will tell you when there is an available update...don't take it personally.

    Let's be honest, if the update was free, you wouldn't be complaining...
     
  7. applefan macrumors regular

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    No. Cal.
    #7
    In iTunes preferences>general, uncheck "Check for iPhoto updates automatically". I think that would do it.
     

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  8. qtip919 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2002
    #8
    2nd

    I think this is really quite nice, and I enjoy the way in which they present this information. In all honesty, I want to be "sold" on the new software since I love Apple upgrades

    However, everyone around here should take a large portion of "I told you so" when all of us (who really dont think of Bill Gates and his torture room of Windows software as completely evil) have been telling you all that Apple will do the same things as windows (if not worse) to get their share of $$
     
  9. neocell macrumors 65816

    neocell

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    #9
    Here's a very good program that can prevent this and other reporting. LittleSnitch
     
  10. iEdd macrumors 68000

    iEdd

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    #10
    Yeah Jamdr is right. Apple have always had notifications of updates, and I think it's in iPhoto preferences to be notified of updates, AND it IS an update. Just check the box and get on with your lives :p
     
  11. VanNess macrumors 6502a

    VanNess

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    #11
    I got one of these (for Garageband 3) when I launched Garageband 2 the other day. Not a big deal, since it gives the option to shut it off completely, but what I wonder is how this thing showed up in the first place. That's kind of a big deal.

    Garageband 2 has no need to automatically connect to the web as there are no web enhanced features in Garageband. And there is nothing in it's preferences to set for automatic updating. It does have a menu option if you want to check for an update, but you have to select it, supposedly, before it comes alive. So how did Apple know that I had launched Garageband, that it was Garageband 2, and it was time for a little nudge? How did the little nudge get there?

    I have no idea. I always shut down automatic updating on any app that offers it. I manually run OS X's software update. I figure Apple knows what software I have courtesy of software update, and I might have registered iLife 05, but I really don't remember. I do have a DSL connection, though. Maybe it's time for little snitch.

    I don't think it's bad form on Apple's part, I think it's extremely bad form. Right up there with the countless entries in Microsoft's vast Hall of Shame. But what really bothers me is that whatever this thing was, it launched itself unattended. In other words, something seems to have installed itself or somehow snuck into my machine for the purpose of creating and launching that window without requiring my administrator's password. If Apple was trying to demonstrate vulnerabilities in OS X, it couldn't have done so more effectively.

    Honestly, what were they thinking?
     
  12. pashazade macrumors member

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    Mar 5, 2004
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    Richmond, London, UK
    #12
    So, tell us, do you have it set to check for updates?

    If not then yes this is bad.

    If it is ticked then you are only getting what you asked for.
     
  13. Preacher85 thread starter macrumors member

    Preacher85

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    Nov 21, 2004
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    Vermillion, SD
    #13
    My update checker is checked. I just don't like that I keep getting solicited (emails, this ad, etc.) to buy the upgrades to iLife. Seriously, it feels like telemarketing. Makes me wanna hang up on them :p Nah, I love how Macs work. I'm just not liking how...money-grubbing the company has become lately. I miss the Apple of the past that went to great lengths to wow it's consumers.

    I guess I just don't like the in-your-face BUY ME that Apple has been doing. For instance, the solicitation to buy .Mac when I installed Tiger.

    Okay, I'm done whining. Let's all just sit back and soak up the rays from the RDF. :rolleyes:
     
  14. Applespider macrumors G4

    Applespider

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    #14
    Bear in mind that many Mac users aren't aware of all these services. When I helped my aunt set up her iMac over Christmas, she wanted to know what .Mac was; she'd rather have had more information about what it was.
    My mother and sister have no clue what iLife 06 is; but they'd probably like to use it - to them, this ad is probably useful.

    I think they strike a fairly happy medium between too in-your-face and completely hidden. The one thing that does bug me is getting an email about upgrading to iLife 06, a week after I've bought and registered it
     
  15. Maedus macrumors regular

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    Dec 4, 2004
    Location:
    Indiana
    #15
    Widgets must scare the hell out of you then. From what I would assume, iPhoto has it built in the application itself and basically all it does is send a request to an Apple server saying, "I'm iPhoto 5.0.4. Is there a higher version than me?" and Apple's servers go, "Yes, there's 6.0.0. Here's the details on it." Much like AdiumX telling me when I'm out of date or even Software Update. I cannot see this being a vulnerability unless Apple itself gets hacked and everything is rerouted, which in that case, I'd say everybody performing system updates would be screwed a lot worse than somebody's iPhoto asking if there is an update or not. All and all, I'd say a web browser even with antivirus and firewalls and javascript disabled and pop-ups blocked would be a bigger security risk than iPhoto asking if there's a higher version or not. Though I'm just spouting common sense off the top of my head, so I may be wrong. Take it with a grain of salt.

    But as for this being intrusive and horrible and borderline adware, etc. I just have to say that while you may hate it, I like it. I like that AdiumX tells me when it needs updating so I don't have to keep checking their website. And I like that Apple does the same thing in case I don't have Software Update running automatically or checking only once a month, which I do because I'm on dial-up and sometimes that becomes a real nuisance when you're downloading something and Software Update keeps deciding to run when I least want it to. Plus, I might push off non-critical updates until there are enough of them to make a night of downloading them all, especially if any require restarts. So iPhoto notifying me will probably make me check Software Update and see what I need to download or see why I need to download it.

    Also, if I didn't really keep up with how Apple releases things or read MacRumors, I might not have known iLife '06 was out already and I sure as heck wouldn't be checking the Apple Store every day to see when it's been released. Or maybe I wanted it but wasn't ready to purchase it yet and things got busy and I forgot it was even out, but I start up iPhoto and viola, a notification and I remember I've been wanting it. And if I don't like it, I can always turn it off.

    And I never hated Microsoft being helpful with reminding you to update or notifying you of something important. I only hate it when their "help" makes things harder or when they have a dialogue box that has the "Do Not Show Again" check box and you check it and yet the next time that situation occurs, that dialogue box comes up again asking you what you want to do and the "Do Not Show Again" is STILL checked! What I've always hated about Microsoft wasn't any of their software but the fact that they monopolized the market AND used their position of power to dominate the competition and to strangle any rivals. If they were a monopoly because their products were that good (or if people actually wanted them that much) and not because they used their money to buy out key personnel of their competition so that they can't compete or make it too costly to operate within their market, then I wouldn't hate Microsoft.
     
  16. Project macrumors 68020

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    Aug 6, 2005
    #16
    I think you are kicking up WAY too much fuss. Nobody complains when its an iTunes notification of an update. The dialogue even offers a 'dont tell me about iLife 06 again' box for you to check. Very tastefully done in my opinion.
     
  17. Maedus macrumors regular

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    Indiana
    #17
    Now if iPhoto went, "Update to iLife '06 now or I'm deleting all your pictures," with a picture of the iPhoto app holding a gun on your photo collection, then I'd be up in arms about it.
     
  18. kwajaln macrumors 6502

    kwajaln

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    CHICAGO!
    #18
    Whiners of the Mac world, UNITE!
    Preacher ~ Rather than take half a second to simply click the "Don't tell me about iLife '06 again" you took the time to blur your family's photos on your desktop, take a screenshot, and make a post about it all here. I don't get it.
     
  19. Preacher85 thread starter macrumors member

    Preacher85

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    #19
    I had some down-time. :rolleyes: Besides, there has been some good discussion here. It doesn't hurt to share opinions. I've actually liked reading everyone's reaction to this. Maybe I over-reacted a bit (never!), but at least there has been good feedback and discussion.
     
  20. VanNess macrumors 6502a

    VanNess

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    #20
    First of all, why on earth would widgets scare the hell out of me? In order to download a widget, the user must deliberately click a widget link on a webpage that is providing a widget in order for it to be downloaded and installed. Like downloading anything else, whether it's an application or a file or media content of some kind, it's a user-initiated action for a specific request to be performed that the user is obviously fully cognizant of.

    However, in the first release of 10.4, which would automatically install widgets into the users widgets folder without requiring further action from the user, the specter of the "evil widget" was raised, where theoretically an evil widget provider could install evil into a user's widget folder just by the user simply visiting a web page and not clicking anything. The theoretical evil widget would then begin to download itself in the background while you were just staring at the webpage. Even still, the evil widget would have several high hurtles to overcome before it could manage to do it's nefarious work. First, even though it downloads in the background, Safari's download manager, which checks the content of files downloaded from the net, would warn that you are downloading an "application" and require via a dialog box that you approve before Safari would complete the download. Second, if the evil widget somehow made it past that barrier (or if you were using a browser other than Safari) the evil widget could only install itself into the widget folder. It couldn't automatically launch itself. The user would still need to visit the dashboard, then open the dashboard bar, then select the evil widget, and finally drag the evil widget into the dashboard where it was presumed that finally the evil widget would invoke unimaginable chaos and world-wide disorder.

    Although the theoretical evil widget remained just that - theoretical - and nothing was ever released into the wild, eyebrows were apparently raised at Apple HQ, the result of which can be seen by the way widgets are handled from versions 10.4.2 to present. Now, any new non-Apple widget that is downloaded, regardless of what browser is used, is trapped inside a special security pane of Dashboard, where the user can initially review, examine, sample and test drive the widget. Then the user, via the security pane dialog, must accept the widget for it to be installed or send it to the trash. What, me worry?

    The point here is an example of the level of security that so far has been one of OS X's chief hallmarks. Nothing installs itself and runs without the user's action and consent, whether it's by the user installing via drag and drop, or authenticating a software installation by administrator password, or by approving an application that's being launched on the system for the first time via a user dialog box.

    I don't have an issue with the content of this iLife thing, I have an issue with how it got on my system. As I said before, this happened with Garageband 2, which is about the only iLife app I use. Garageband 2, like Garageband 1 before it, has no conceivable need to connect to the internet. There is nothing in Garageband 2 that is web-enabled or web-dependant. There is no automatic software update preference in Garageband. There is a manual software update check via a menu item in Garageband's application menu, but I've never run it once going back to Garageband 1. Nevertheless, suddenly the iLife ad showed up when I launched Garageband a few days ago.

    I suppose an argument can be made that if a user checks a preference in an iLife application for automatic software update notification, then the door is wide open for the latest iLife 06 ads. I think it's a pretty poor argument overall, in that the honest, real world user expectation is notification of software updates for the software they own, not software versions they do not. But in the case of Garageband, the argument is dead on arrival, because there is no automatic software update notification feature. There is no "opt-in" of any kind, shape or form. So the question still remains, how did it get there? How did it bypass all of the hallowed security features of OS X, features that are designed and implemented to, among other things, prevent this sort of thing from happening in the first place? This is Windows type stuff, not OS X.

    It doesn't matter how benign it is, or that others may view it (or excuse it) as desirable. That's not the point. I don't care that it was "just an ad." If you in any way care about the oft-touted security features of OS X, then you should care how this thing managed to compose and display it's own unique window separate from all other running applications without any action at all on the part of the user. That's the issue.
     
  21. radiantm3 macrumors 65816

    radiantm3

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    #21
    This isn't something new. I remember this on ilife 04 when 05 was released. You get the same thing on a lot of shareware as well, so I don't really see the big deal.
     
  22. emutree macrumors member

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    Sep 4, 2005
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    Canada
    #22
    Thanks, I was just going to point that out - this happened last year and there was just as big a fuss about it then. Personally I think it's a great idea - there are a lot of Mac users out there who don't watch the Keynote or visit the homepage all the time that *gasp* might now know about iLife '06. If there's a feature in it that they've been wanting forever, this is a great way for them to see that it's been added. It can be turned off with a little checkbox, so chill.
     
  23. nagromme macrumors G5

    nagromme

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    #23
    I assume it's because you have enabled the preference "check for updates automatically." If you haven't and it still happens, that's annoying (but you can still turn the message off with one click).

    Being told about a new version of an app... BY that app... is hardly some evil thing (if you can disable it, which you can)--and is common among many programs.
     
  24. Maedus macrumors regular

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    #24
    I said you must be scared of widgets for the fact that an "evil widget" is going to have a much higher likelihood of exploiting a computer by either tricking the OS or more likely, tricking the user into installing and running it. My point is, of all the possible security breaches in Mac OS X (widgets, browsers, email, and the like) a system controlled internet query for some sort of information is low on list. I'd only be worried if the system it is querying has been rendered unsafe, in which case, all of us are screwed because if Apple's computers have been breached somehow and some third party is able to control the information it sends out, then Software Update will be the biggest hole in our security since it's purpose is to modify our system files. Hopefully we'd be able to stop this because it'd ask for an administrator's password and it could be stopped before anything is changed, but then again, whoever is able to hack Apple and put out a fake system update might also know how to disable or circumvent the administrator's password.

    The reason the iPhoto isn't asking for an administrator's password is because one, nothing is being installed that isn't already installed, namely the iLife Apps. You gave your password and accepted the installation when you originally installed iLife. Nothing new is being or has been installed and nothing new is running because the ad is being ran through the iLife app that you're running be it iPhoto or Garageband. Now I'll agree that Garageband putting up the information is crappy because there is no dialogue box to check to disable it from ever happening in the first place.

    And directing the next question more broadly, as for the question of if Apple should have advertised iLife '06 in iLife '05, just because you don't like it doesn't immediately mean that Apple shouldn't do something. If it is kept simple, tasteful, and easily eliminated, then those who don't like it should click the "Do Not Show Again" box and go on with their lives because there are people who will see it and go, "Yea! Thanks Apple! That was very helpful of you and it has made my computing experience that much better," and their lives (or at least computing experience) might be a lot better off in exchange for two seconds and two mouse clicks of your precious time, because ultimately, Apple isn't making their software or hardware just for you or a specific individual, but they are trying to satisfy the most people in the best way that they can and also make some money while doing it because iLife wasn't free to make and it isn't free to maintain.

    To recap, I'm fine with the iLife "ad" as long as it is kept tasteful, minimal, and isn't unnecessarily distracting. If iLife ever starts popping up ads during the middle of me doing something instead of when the app first starts up or if Mac OS X starts having pop-ups that appear for no apparent reason and bog down the system when they come up, like the HP ad on the PC downstairs, then I'll bitch and whine about Apple's horrible practices. but not for Apple doing the same thing as other companies' programs I use and don't get bent out of shape over.

    And the moral of my post is: just because you don't like it doesn't mean I don't like it.
     
  25. Coheebuzz macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2005
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    Nicosia, Cyprus
    #25
    Its an ad for Gods sakes! You are exposed to over 100,000 ads per day on average if you didn't know that. The Apple logo on the top left corner is also an ad too ;).
    I don't mind the current one from iPhoto since it doesn't say "Buy me now!!!" anywere, it looks more like an anouncement and it also gives you the option to turn it off - something thats missing from the other 99,999...
     

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