I am not that impressed anymore

Discussion in 'Mac OS X Lion (10.7)' started by petvas, May 6, 2011.

  1. macrumors 68040

    petvas

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2006
    Location:
    Mannheim, Germany
    #1
    When I initially installed Lion I was very impressed by the new features. Now, and after I have been using it for a week now, I not that impressed anymore. I think there is room for improvements:


    * Launchpad: The idea is good but the implementation could be much better. You should make launchpad behave like a computer application and not like an iPad one! Right click should offer context menu to create new folders, rename and delete folders. Right clicking on an app should offer options to move it to an existing folder, or create a new one. Launchpad should also have the option not to run in full screen mode! In its current incarnation I am not going to be using it. I still prefer Spotlight for running apps. For organizing them I still prefer the apps folder on the dock.
    * Full screen mode: A good idea that works very well if you have small screens or/and resolution. On my ACD I have so much space that for most apps, full screen mode is an overkill. I don't see me using it a lot. Maybe when Aperture gets it I will use it.
    * Mission Control: This one I like. It combines spaces and expose very nice.
    * Mail.app: The new layout is nice but I would like to see some new features regarding Exchange Server. More compatibility to Exchange would be nice. Support for Out of Office messages, categories and Exchange tasks are essential.
    * Saving the state of apps: It does take a while to get used to the fact that the state of all apps is always being saved on exit. I would prefer to have the option (without using the Alt key) to not save the state of an app by default. There are situations you don't want to have an app resume its state. Imagine showing a video to someone. You close quicktime and then after a while you need quicktime again. You open it and the video resumes...Not very good!
    * Finder: I prefer to have the devices on top on the left side of Finder and not on the bottom. There should be an option to change that.
     
  2. Moderator

    maflynn

    Staff Member

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    May 3, 2009
    Location:
    Boston
    #2
    You know there's already a couple of threads discussing the features of Lion, why create another?
     
  3. thread starter macrumors 68040

    petvas

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2006
    Location:
    Mannheim, Germany
    #3
    Because after a while all these threads become so big, it is difficult to keep track of what's going on. You don't have to read the thread if you don't want to.
     
  4. thread starter macrumors 68040

    petvas

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2006
    Location:
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    #4
    To return to the thread, Lion has been remarkable stable so far. I like it better than Snow Leopard, it is just that most of the new features aren't really cutting it for me. Are there others here who feel the same?
     
  5. macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2006
    #5
    one thing in lion that will not get used for me is the launchpad. damn on my 27" ACD it's so big. i remember all of my installed apps and prefer to use spotlight for easy way to launch them.
     
  6. thread starter macrumors 68040

    petvas

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2006
    Location:
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    #6
    I totally agree. Launchpad should run in a window. Spotlight is still the way to go for power users. Of course,normal people will like the launchpad.
     
  7. macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2007
    Location:
    NH
    #7
    Is anyone running Lion on a lower-powered machine? I'd like to hear feedback on those who have tried it on an 11" MBA.
     
  8. Moderator

    maflynn

    Staff Member

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    #8
    Search this forum, there's some threads about folks running lion on a core duo (not core 2 duo) cpu
     
  9. macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2006
    #9
    tried Lion with my 11" base air but with 4 gig of rams. smooth as butter. i think the air is capable running Lion without any hiccups. make sure the minimum ram is 4GB.
     
  10. shenfrey, May 6, 2011
    Last edited: May 6, 2011

    macrumors 65816

    shenfrey

    Joined:
    May 23, 2010
    #10
    honestly, it feels like Lion is more of an experiment then an actual upgrade. Maybe preparing not just for the future of IOS but Mac OS to.
     
  11. macrumors 6502a

    poobear

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2009
    #11
    Are you saying that you are not impressed by this feature just because it doesn't fit YOUR need, even though you emphasize that it works very well if you have a small screen (most Mac users have the laptop)?

    Runs smooth as butter on my 11" 2GB machine.
     
  12. thread starter macrumors 68040

    petvas

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2006
    Location:
    Mannheim, Germany
    #12
    I am saying that this feature isn't very important to me. I know that for people with relative small displays or other needs, that full screen is a good idea (as I said before).
    I am still giving Full screen mode a chance. I have been using mail and Safari in full screen the whole day and I am trying to find reasons to use it, but I think it doesn't fit in my workflows.
     
  13. macrumors 601

    talmy

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2009
    Location:
    Oregon
    #13
    Looking at the GUI aspects, Lion seems to be optimized for small screens and is particularly irritating for using with multiple displays. "Full Screen" blanks any secondary displays! Agree that Launchpad looks ridiculous.

    I don't like the change in operation for Spaces, and the change in keyboard assignment seems gratuitous, but at least the assignments can be changed back.

    However the changes "under the hood" (particularly resume, version control, and off-line TimeMachine) look good indeed, but most will require updated software. I expect the iWork suite to be updated at the time of Lion's release, which will help. Other Apple-centric developers will certainly play along, but I expect long waits for Microsoft Office and Adobe CS.
     
  14. macrumors 6502a

    Thunderbird

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2005
    #14
    Is it true you actually have to launch Launchpad first, then find your app and click it open? if so, how is that an improvement? By the time you perform those steps, you could have typed the app name into Spotlight, or opened the app folder in the dock.

    Maybe there's a way to have Launchpad open upon startup of your machine by default, then just click open app icons from there, much in the same way Windows users have icons pinned to their desktops?

    Looking forward to WWDC in a month when we should get a better idea of what Lion is really going to be like.
     
  15. thread starter macrumors 68040

    petvas

    Joined:
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    #15
    Yes, it is true. Launchpad is actually useful for people that come from an iPad to a Mac. They would find something familiar to work with.
    In its current incarnation this is really for beginners. If Apple adds more organization features, this could become a really nice way to organize apps.
     
  16. macrumors 68020

    JoeG4

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    Bay Area, Ca.
    #16
  17. thread starter macrumors 68040

    petvas

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    #17
  18. macrumors 603

    bedifferent

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2009
    Location:
    NY
    #18
    Exactly. Fine tuned for the new Joe-sumer iOS market, but nothing mind blowing for us Prosumers.
     
  19. thread starter macrumors 68040

    petvas

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2006
    Location:
    Mannheim, Germany
    #19
    From all the new features in Lion I am pretty sure I won't be using one: The Launchpad. It is crippled and acts as an iOS app. What happened to right clicking? Context Menus? Why do I need to drag an app over another in order to create a folder? Why can't I just right click and create an empty folder? When Apple makes the Launchpad a Desktop OS app, I might use it.
     
  20. macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2011
    Location:
    Shanghai, China
    #20
    I used to use Spotlight on Snowleopard for launching any apps as it was really very snappy, but in Lion Spotlight is nearly unusable: it takes ages to deliver its results and now launchpad is the only way.
    Do you too find Spotlight slow and sluggish in Lion or am I the only one?
    BTW i am running Lion on both a iMac and MBP 17 and spotlight speed is nearly the same!
     
  21. thread starter macrumors 68040

    petvas

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2006
    Location:
    Mannheim, Germany
    #21
    At first Spotlight was not functioning properly, so I disabled it for the boot volume and reenable it. After that everything worked great. No differences to Snow Leopard apart from the nice previews on the results.
     
  22. macrumors 68030

    baryon

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2009
    #22
    Why doesn't Apple just put all the apps on the desktop, and allow people to just swipe through them? Basically this would be exactly like iOS then: the desktop (home screen) would act as the launchpad. You could just have an empty page in the beginning so you could have a clean desktop, and then just swipe left and have all your apps come up.

    I just find it very fragmented to have the following:
    1. A desktop where you don't really have anything except removable drives
    2. The Finder where you have everything
    3. The dock where you have some apps you use often + ones you're using now
    4. The launchpad where you have part of what you already have in the finder, just displayed differently

    So there are 4 different places you could place your apps, how is this consistent?
     
  23. thread starter macrumors 68040

    petvas

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2006
    Location:
    Mannheim, Germany
    #23
    There are different uses to all of the above features. The Desktop is the place you put temp stuff you need to access fast or you want to think about them later. The Finder is not only for launching apps, it is a file manager.
    The Dock is an app launcher and app manager.
    The Launchpad is the first feature from Apple that tries to create a unified way of finding, managing and launching apps. I don't like it as it is now, but it could really become something great.
     
  24. macrumors 603

    bedifferent

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2009
    Location:
    NY
    #24
    Interesting. This would be similar to the Dashboard "Dev" mode, in that you can drag a widget to your desktop. I'm certain that once the OS is released someone will find a way to drag folders/icons onto the desktop. My only issue it that it seems to be a flawed concept for a desktop OS. The dock or Spotlight seems to be the best way in accessing applications, at least for me. Arranging icons one at a time into folders, then accessing those folders to open an app is a step or so more than simply clicking on an app in the dock.

    That's just my take, doesn't mean I'm right. My only major disappointment is in Apple's continued work to focus on iDevices and the iOS market, now bridging them together. I'd rather them be separate, work well together but not blur the lines. Focus on making OS X and professional systems for those who need it, and yes I know it may be a niche market for some. However, keep this in mind, many businesses invested in PowerMac's and ACD's and Proapps when Apple focused on that market. It may be a small market, but the mass amount that businesses invested in the Professional market for Apple was enough to carry it through before the advent of the iPod and further devices. Many are leaving as we make our living from computers and given the current situation it would seem anti-thetical to invest thousands in Apple products if they do not wish to invest in us.
     
  25. macrumors member

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2009
    #25
    Its just prettier. But functionality is pretty much the same.
     

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