i could use some advise, related to college and BA degrees

Discussion in 'Community' started by acidrock, Apr 16, 2004.

  1. acidrock macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2004
    Location:
    The Evergreen State College
    #1
    hi I'm going through seniorites but I'm a juinor. I attend a very liberal art's college, Evergreen. I was part time for two years and now went full time in a very challenging program studying cognitive neuroscience. I was very interested in this field, but I've been thinking a lot and talking to faculty of the program. They feel that science is not the right field for me. I have also had a lot of trouble understanding some of the concepts they have been covering because I've never had a real science class before.

    So I've been thinking of changing my major, well the thing is they don't have major's here you just get a BA or a BS or both if you take a 5th year. The only thing is it's possibly my last year next year and i don't want a degree that is going to mean nothing. We can take basically any program or class that we want to here and now I'm finding if I don't go for the BS that I'm going to have a degree but not have a very solid foundation in any subject since I've taken various subjects all over.

    My first area of interest was music therapy because i love music and was interested in psychology/ cousneling. Though now I've detered from that. I think I'm leaning either towards still getting a science degree or studying something like comparitive religion or middle east stuides. I've done a lot of committee work relating towards the middle east and peace work, so this seems natural. However I don't want a degree that will require me to go to graudate school because I"m not sure I want to go. Maybe I will change my mind in a few years but I could really use some advise.

    The real issue is I've looked at the full time a catalog and besides once science program there are none i want to take all year, so my inclination is to go part time even though the classes are hard. Do you guys have any adivse? I mean what might someone do in compartive religion or middle east studies? Should i try and go for the science degree? -thax nathan

    ps: I've just had the thought of taking a year off and trying to figure things out, however, I"m also a student going back to school and have plans of living with a freind off campus, and I'm going back to school already. I don't want to stop and have to come back and go through that again but I may think about this more. But any advise will help ---
     
  2. Dippo macrumors 65816

    Dippo

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2003
    Location:
    Charlotte, NC
    #2
    I think the question is "what do you want to do after school?"

    Sure you can get an "easy" BA degree, but what good would it do you?
     
  3. acidrock thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2004
    Location:
    The Evergreen State College
    #3
    hey I'm really not sure what I want to do after I graduate. I know I want to work but I can't tell exactly what, I seem to be keep changing my mind. Well I just decided not to take the year off, so I'm probably going to go part time. I think what I'm going to do is try talking to faculty I know who could possibly advise me about what direction to go in ie: religion or science. But I am really interested in science, just had trouble understanding some of the material. I think I would love to work in a lab even though I am already this summer -n
     
  4. Dippo macrumors 65816

    Dippo

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2003
    Location:
    Charlotte, NC
    #4
    If you understood everything, then you would be teaching the class :D

    Don't let a little trouble understanding the material keep you from pursuing what you want to do.

    I got a BS in Physics and truthfully I didn't know what was going on half the time. I had plenty of trouble understanding the information, but I still was able to learn enough to get the grades.

    If you really love science, then pursue it.
     
  5. acidrock thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2004
    Location:
    The Evergreen State College
    #5
    hey that's really good advise. I'm thinking of regestering for the science class and just seeing how the internship goes. If i do badly in it for example maybe i would change my mind and do something different. Thanks a lot! --
     
  6. tdhurst macrumors 68040

    tdhurst

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2003
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #6
    Ya sure?

    Hmm....that's not always the case in my experience...
     
  7. Dippo macrumors 65816

    Dippo

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2003
    Location:
    Charlotte, NC
    #7

    Correction:
    "If you understood everything, then you should be teaching the class."

    Yes, I know, I have had plenty of those classes too...
     
  8. Westside guy macrumors 601

    Westside guy

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2003
    Location:
    The soggy side of the Pacific NW
    #8
    I don't want to say that one's particular course of study doesn't matter - but it often matters less than you might think. I originally thought I was a bit odd, because I have a degree in physics but haven't really worked in physics (I'm a webmaster now, but was a programmer and research support person in a climate research group before). But I've run into a lot of people who are not working in the field they got their degrees in - it might even be the majority of people for whom I know what they'd studied.

    The college degree is definitely important; but for a lot of jobs the degree basically serves as proof that you were able to do that level of work (and so are intelligent and can be self-disciplined) more than anything specific to the particular job. They might want to know if you've got some general exposure to the area they are in, which was the case with my research support job; but a lot of times you end up learning a lot "on the job" because (as you'll find out) college really can't teach you the specifics you'll end up needing in the real world.
     
  9. acidrock thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2004
    Location:
    The Evergreen State College
    #9
    hey what you're saying really makes sense, i talked to a relative last night and she explained the same thing to me. but thanks a lot -n
     
  10. Mav451 macrumors 68000

    Mav451

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2003
    Location:
    Maryland
    #10
    Yep, I totally agree. Can't tell you HOW many people I know, early-mid twenties, who have mechanical/electrical engineering degrees (I don't care where you take it, it is NOT a cake walk :) ), and are now working at a business firm!

    Engineering degree really proves that you got the determination, intelligence, and what everyone's father ALWAYS talk about; Discipline, to be a good worker.

    *Only now that I'm in college am I starting to understand why my dad talked about it so much :(
     
  11. Neserk macrumors 6502a

    Neserk

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2004
    #11
    A Generic BA is better than no BA. Many businesses don't care *what* your BA was in, just so long as you have one. Many jobs that are fussy about what you studied prefer that you get a Master's Degree or higher (Psychology, for example) or a special degree (like a Teaching Credential).

    What kind of job you end up in probably has more to do with your personality. For example, in CA apparently you can be in pharmecutical sales with a general Bachelor's. But that requires a certain personality, imo. IOW, I personally wouldn't be good at it.
     
  12. jamdr macrumors 6502a

    jamdr

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2003
    Location:
    Bay Area
    #12
    I think some of this advice might be a little off. Many people here are essentially saying that it doesn't matter what your undergraduate degree is, as long as you have one. Well, this isn't necessarily true. While virtually any degree can be applied to a career in business, for example, you can't major in just anything if you want to go into medicine or psychology (which is probably what you'd be doing with a neuroscience degree). If you are interested in the brain and want to have a job related to that interest, you have to know something about the brain to begin with, which means taking a lot of chem, bio, and psyc. Even if you go to graduate school, it is still necessary to have an undergrad degree at least somewhat related to your masters. I say if you want the science degree, go for it. I don't believe that certain people just aren't "good" at math or science. You just have to work hard.
     
  13. acidrock thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2004
    Location:
    The Evergreen State College
    #13
    hey I see your points here too. I think that the difference is pending on the type of degree or job you want to do etc. and that's what i really gotta figure out. I think though earlier i was confused about how important it was to have a degree/ background in the subject I was studying. But I think I understand it better now.

    thanks for the advsie everyone -n
     
  14. Neserk macrumors 6502a

    Neserk

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2004
    #14
    As we explained to the original poster, most of the time it is true. A Master's degree can make up for what is lacking in a Bachelor's degree. Very few specific Bachelor's degrees are useful to go directly into a career. One of the few exceptions is a BSW (Bachelor's in Social Work). Yes, a science degree is helpful but the MCAT scores are what count for getting into Med School. And I believe that the orignal poster has indicated that using the sciences isn't happening for him/her.

    If she/he wants to go into psychology he/she is going to need a Master's degree *at least* if not a PhD. His/Her scores on the GRE's are more important. A BA/BS shows the school that the student is able to study at a University level. I had a BA in Psychology and then earned an MA in Theology. Now I'm working on my Multiple Subject Teaching Credential. I had also started a PhD program in Biblical Studies which could be entered from an BA/BS degree or a MA/MS in a completely unrealted field. Those w/o the MA in Biblical Studies/Theology simply took more classes.

    No, you don't. Although he/she may have to take more courses in the Master's program.

    I disagree. I see students all the time who can't wrap their brain around higher math (especially) and not all people are conceptual learners. Some people are better at remember specific facts. Ohters are great writers. We all have different abilities. It is just a matter and finding what "yours" is and finding a career that fits. So, if this person isn't able to grasp many of the concepts in Science s/he is going to have a tough time with both Psychology and the hard Sciences.
     
  15. Neserk macrumors 6502a

    Neserk

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2004
    #15
    Continue reading ;) And most importantly, look at grad schools because they will tell you exactly what you need to get in!
     

Share This Page