I have a problem with my landor, legal advice.

Discussion in 'Community' started by mymemory, Sep 14, 2005.

  1. mymemory macrumors 68020

    mymemory

    Joined:
    May 9, 2001
    Location:
    Miami
    #1
    Ok, a few months ago I moved to thsi apartment, there was a leak on the sealin and in a rain the water came down on one of my Powerbooks. I lost the powerbook and I talked to the Landor and she says I need to get an insurance.

    Now, I have videos of the leaking and everything documented I do not have anybody to actually tell me if I can go to the small claim court with that. The lease does not says anything about anybody's responsabilities over goods and stuff. Actually the lease is a piece of paper with singantures and that is it.

    Anybody?
     
  2. clayj macrumors 604

    clayj

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2005
    Location:
    visiting from downstream
    #2
    I think she's got you here. As a renter or a condo dweller, you need to have renter's insurance or what's called an HO-6 policy, which covers your belongings in the event of fire, theft, or other damage.

    I live in a condo and therefore have HO-6 insurance for my belongings and loss-of-value if the place burns down; the building's general insurance policy covers everything behind the walls (leaky pipes, etc.) which are not part of my condo (which is usually defined as "paint-to-paint", i.e., the space enclosed by the walls).
     
  3. m-dogg macrumors 65816

    m-dogg

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2004
    Location:
    Connecticut
    #3
    Ditto. It's not even that expensive for coverage, so I recommend you get it going forward. I can relate to how it feels to get screwed by not having any insurance though...I had the unfortunate luck of being robbed a few years ago without any renters insurance. I've had it ever since, but I was never able to recover many of the items the thief stole.
     
  4. iGary Guest

    iGary

    Joined:
    May 26, 2004
    Location:
    Randy's House
    #4
    Renter's insurance: $100.00 a year for $25,000 in coverage. $1,000 deductible. Your mileage may vary.

    Sorry bud, you don't have much to stand on.
     
  5. mymemory thread starter macrumors 68020

    mymemory

    Joined:
    May 9, 2001
    Location:
    Miami
    #5
    So, if there is a problem with the unit and it damaged my property I can not get a refound? :(
     
  6. clayj macrumors 604

    clayj

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2005
    Location:
    visiting from downstream
    #6
    Probably not. The landlord's responsibility extends only to the residence itself (walls, pipes, included appliances, etc.), not the stuff that you brought with you when you moved in.
     
  7. skunk macrumors G4

    skunk

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2002
    Location:
    Republic of Ukistan
    #7
    That's what insurance is for.
     
  8. mymemory thread starter macrumors 68020

    mymemory

    Joined:
    May 9, 2001
    Location:
    Miami
    #8
    Yes, but there was a deficency in the unite that caused a damage on my equipment.

    I mean, you rent an apartment and next day the floor brakes appart and you fall and brake your bones... the landor is not responsible for any of your injures?
     
  9. mpw Guest

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2004
    #9
    You need to get someone to look at your lease agreement. I work for a property management company (not in the US) and every one of our leases specifically states that the tenant needs to insure his contents separately.

    That said any damage caused should be paid for by the landlord but knowing landlords you're going to have to fight for it. Best to ask a local lawyer what your odds of winning are.
     
  10. OnceUGoMac macrumors 6502a

    OnceUGoMac

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2004
    #10
    Apple & oranges, my friend. I'm sorry for your loss, but it's not the landlords responsibility to cover your stuff.
     
  11. firststrike101 macrumors member

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2005
    Location:
    Manitoba, Canada
    #11
    its content insurance, ie. insures anything within the rented space. If you do not have it your out of luck. The only thing that you can do is get a order to get the landlord to repair your apartment.
     
  12. Abstract macrumors Penryn

    Abstract

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2002
    Location:
    Location Location Location
    #12
    Not the landlord's fault.

    And your spelling. ;)
     
  13. saabmp3 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2002
    Location:
    Tacoma, WA
    #13
    No chance in hell are you going to get a dime for your stuff unless the landlord has quite a big heart. Renter's insurance is there for EXACTLY this kind of situation.

    The example you bring up involves bodily harm, which there are laws to prevent.

    BEN
     
  14. mpw Guest

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2004
    #15
    I don't know what it's like in the US but in the UK the landlord would be liable as the damage was caused by his building. It may not be covered by his building insurance but he'll have personally liability insurance that would cover it and even if he has no insurance at all he's still liable but you'll need to take legal action if he refuses to pay.

    And yes, your spelling!
     
  15. echeck macrumors 68000

    echeck

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2004
    Location:
    Boise, Idaho
    #16
    I really don't think you're going to have any luck getting the landlord to pay for the damages. As others have said, this is exactly what renter's insurance is for. I'm currently in the process of buying a rental property and in my lease agreement I am going to require all tenants to have renter's insurance so as to avoid any sort of problems like these from popping up.

    Good luck though!
     
  16. mpw Guest

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2004
    #17
    Requiring your tenants to have insurance is a very wise move but it insures their loss not yours.
    If your property leaks and damages their furniture then they will be covered by their insurance and won't lose out. Their insurance company will then want to recover their loses from the person liable, ie you. You of course will be able to insure yourself against this and so on, and so on until the insurance companies have all our money.
    In practice many insurers accept the loss for small claims as not worth their time chasing.
    I’ve calculated the premiums for all the various insurances I’ve paid out over the years and the claims I’ve made come nowhere close, makes you wonder if insurance is worth it. If I’d put the monthly premiums on Celtic to beat whoever they where playing that week I’d be well up on the deal.
     
  17. Applespider macrumors G4

    Applespider

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2004
    Location:
    looking through rose-tinted spectacles...
    #18
    One of those gambles in life I guess. I do have contents insurance and I've claimed on it once (for about £800) while paying out probably about £2,500 over the last 10 years.

    I guess that paying it at £20 a month, I don't notice it. When something goes wrong, it always seems to be at the worse possible time, when paying out the £800 would have made the aftermath feel even worse. And I'm less concerned about taking my gadgets out with me or something going wrong in one of the flats above me and killing something.
     

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