I need some help from a Video God.

Discussion in 'Digital Video' started by thumper, Jan 16, 2006.

  1. thumper macrumors 6502

    thumper

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    #1
  2. yoak macrumors 65816

    yoak

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    #2
    Hi
    There are 2 ways, both similar and depending on your MiniDV camera.
    Many mini DV cameras can work as a kind of "bridge" to digitize analoge video.

    1.You hook your Canon up to your mac with a Firewire or USB
    2 You connect your Hi8 to your Canon, cables should be provided. I have only done this from my VCR with old VHS so I´m not sure what cables you need. Connect the Hi8 to your Canon as you would connect it to a TV.
    3. You should now be able to see the Hi8 footage on the small screen on the Canon.
    4. Now try to capture from iMovie. I think you have to have the Canon in rec mode. If you have your manual, it should say something about this there
    5. If this dosen´t work you have to copy the footage over to MiniDV tapes first. Then play them off your MiniDV and capture with iMovie. Takes twice as long as you probably understand.

    Please feel free to ask as it´s probably not too well explained here as I´m doing it off memory.

    Good luck
     
  3. thumper thread starter macrumors 6502

    thumper

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    #3
    thank you very much!!
    :) :D :) :D :) :D :) :D

    i just need to find the right cables, then ill
    tell you how it goes.
     
  4. yoak macrumors 65816

    yoak

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    #4
    Your welcome.
    I couldn´t see from the picture of the Sony camera what kind on connections it have.
    From my VCR I used a "3 phono to minijack" not sure what one call that cable. I then had an scart adapter I plugged the phono side into, and plugged the mini jack side into the DV camera

    On my old mini VHS camcorder I had those "phono" out connections. With that camera I could have used the same cable without adapter
     
  5. thumper thread starter macrumors 6502

    thumper

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    #5
    on my canon camera.. i dont think it has a Video in:(

    i thought that it was a video in on the side but i think its only for
    connecting the canon to a TV(a Video out)

    should most cameras have a video in? maybe ive over looked it?

    are there any other options?
     
  6. 3dit3r macrumors member

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    Nov 18, 2005
    #6
    According to the link you provided for your Canon camera, you have a Firewire port. Use that port to connect the camera to your computer. Your camera should have come with the proper cable. Re-read the link you provided to see where the port is located on the camera. Daisy chain your Hi-8 to the Canon using RCA cables (yellow is video, red and white are audio). Your Canon will probably have to be in Record (no tape inside) while the Hi-8 is playing in order for the computer to receive the signal.

    If all else fails, you can transfer your Hi-8 tapes to mini-DV using RCA cables...time consuming though...
     
  7. virus1 macrumors 65816

    virus1

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    #7
    video in is a somewhat rare feature. especially for low end cameras. you will most likely need to buy a analog/digital converter
    like this.
     
  8. 3dit3r macrumors member

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    #8
    Nope. Maybe before, but A/V I/O is fairly common in consumer cameras. You have to go into the Menu to toggle In or Out.
     
  9. virus1 macrumors 65816

    virus1

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    #9
    it may be becoming more popular, but i still struggle a bit to find a suitable camera with it.
     
  10. thumper thread starter macrumors 6502

    thumper

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    #10
    if i used an RCA to S-Video
    (Old Hi8 camera to MiniDV)

    would i get a video?
    just wondering if Hi8 would work thru SVideo
     
  11. spacepower7 macrumors 68000

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    #11
    Camera I/O

    Nowadays, alot of the cameras use the same analog output as the connection for the analog input. There usually is a menu item that allows the camera to switch between using the connection for input or output.
     
  12. weldon macrumors 6502a

    weldon

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    #12
    What I did was to rent a Sony digital-8 camera from a local store. These digital-8 cameras are backwards compatible with the Hi8 analog format and will do A/D conversion in the camera. All you need to do is hook up the Sony Digital-8 camera to your Mac via firewire, pop in your Hi8 tape and then capture using iMovie.

    The two models of Sony digital-8 cameras still being sold are the DCR-TRV280 and DCR-TRV480.

    It worked great for me and I think it was the simplest and cleanest way to get the video into my Mac. Granted this was a few years back when MiniDV was still new, but I only paid like $20-30 to rent the camera for 48 hours. I'd recommend calling around to see if you can find a place that will rent a Sony digital-8 camera by the day.
     
  13. Gmaster macrumors member

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    #13
    re: I/O for camcorder

    Yes, spacepower7 and yoak are correct.

    I have a Canon Optura 20, about the same as the 10, and have used it to get old video into iMovie.

    Just use the yellow a/v port with the included cable that has a mini yellow striped plug at one end and the three RCA plugs at the other end.
    Mini plug on the Optura, RCA into the Sony. Power them up and you should see video in iMovie. (I think the Optura needs to be set to "VCR", not "Camera".)
    Give it a shot and good luck.
     
  14. eRondeau macrumors 6502a

    eRondeau

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    #14
    Ditto -- I've also got an Optura-20 and I've done the same thing with a collection of old VHS-C tapes. Works surprisingly well. Just make sure you've got LOTS of HD space available. I edited about 2-hrs of VHS-C into a 45-minute finished iDVD and I needed around 40GB all told. The final iMovie file alone is 18GB. I use a Lacie 160GB HD for video editing storage and it's not nearly enough. But the final DVD quality is surprisingly good, even starting with VHS.
     
  15. rjphoto macrumors 6502a

    rjphoto

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    #15
    I'm pretty sure the TVR280 will do NOT the A/D conversion.

    It is only listed on the TRV480 spec sheet. (http://www.sonystyle.com/is-bin/INT...gital8HandycamCamcorders&ProductSKU=DCRTRV480)

    I borrowed a TRV280 for that specific purpose and ended up bashing my head against a wall trying to get it to work. I thought something was wrong with the tapes I had been given to edit. Ended up getting the owner to bring me her 8MM camcorder to use with a Digital Conversion Box...it worked, but it was a last minuted edit for the event.

    Edit: Most of the Sony's I have used will do pass through conversion. (Not sure about that TRV280).
     
  16. thumper thread starter macrumors 6502

    thumper

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    #16
    ****h A P P Y*** D A Y****

    Thanks for all the input guys, i WAS able to get it to work!!!

    i just had to use the right cable from the sony to the canon camera and its
    like MAGIC!!!

    Now my big proble is SpAcE!!! 80gigs on my PB and 120 on my firewire...
    its still not enough!!! when im capturing in imovie it drops almost 10MB a sec!:eek:

    every 9Mins = 2Gigs

    if i compress this to MP4 will it still look as good on the TV???
    how much can i compress it before it starts lookin bad?
     
  17. yoak macrumors 65816

    yoak

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    #17
    Unfortunatly, MiniDV takes up around 13gig per hour.
    Just wait until you go HDV, then it piles up.
    I have never tried to go from Hi8 to dv to mpeg 4, so I don´t know.
    I suggest you do a quick test. Probably good enough quality for home video is my guess.

    Happy that it worked out for you

    Good luck withh the capturing, 20hours of soo much fun;)
     
  18. thumper thread starter macrumors 6502

    thumper

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    #18
    i just tried exporting the movie to mpeg4.. took 20mins :S and
    in the end looked REALLY BAD
    it went from 2gigs to 25mb

    so, i guess this isnt the right compression.
    any ideas???

    my Hi8 tape is about 60Mins of stuff
    id like to be able to have everything on that tape on a DVD
    but at 2Gigs every 9mins... i run out of DVD room FAST.:eek: :(

    i feel such a noob, its not even funny:p
     
  19. plastique45 macrumors regular

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    #19
    HDV and miniDV uses EXACTLY the same amount of space as they both use a 25mb/sec codec (MPEG2-TS vs miniDV25).
     
  20. rjphoto macrumors 6502a

    rjphoto

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    #20
    Don't panic yet.

    60 Minutes will fit on a DVD using iDVD with no problem and maintain good quality.

    How much free space do you have on your hard drive(s)?

    Finish editing the iMovie footage and then click on the iDVD button right above the end of your time line. This will launch iDVD and start the preparation for creating your DVD.

    Let us know if you need more help.
     
  21. yoak macrumors 65816

    yoak

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    #21
    My bad:eek:
    I was thinking of the new Panasonic and that is NOT HDV, but DVCPro at 50mb/sec.
    I´m not considering buying anything HDV, so that´s why I think of more storage space
    (I know it can do 25mb/s as well as 100mb/s)
     
  22. aloofman macrumors 68020

    aloofman

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    #22
    iDVD is the way to go if it's important to be able to watch them on a TV. The downside is that, depending on how many of the tapes are only partially full, he'll end up with a lot of DVDs to archive all of them. (Or maybe he could edit down the total amount of footage in iMovie before burning it.)

    If watching it on a TV isn't critical, it would take less space to keep them as MP4s and he could probably fit them all on one or two DVD-ROMs.
     
  23. aloofman macrumors 68020

    aloofman

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    #23
    You've compressed it too much. At 25 MB, it's only 1-2% of it's original size. Increase the data rate, frame size, and frame rate, and see what it looks like at, say 250 MB instead. My guess is that it still wouldn't look very good on a full-size TV, but it might be watchable.

    Don't feel like a noob. Even people who do this for a living (like me), find themselves baffled by conversions and compression at times. You can have rough guidelines, but still end up relying on trial and error.
     
  24. eRondeau macrumors 6502a

    eRondeau

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    #24
    I have a limited -- but working -- knowledge of how digital video compression works, and I've been wondering about whether or not it is inherently less efficient to digitize VHS/8mm sources compared to originally shooting the same scene on DV. It seems to me, that the graininess and jitteriness that you just can't avoid with analog recording formats would probably be hell on the compression algorithms. With DV source material, you'll at least get the odd "color block" that will be stored very efficiently. But when A-->D'ing VHS (for example) there's so much video noise everywhere (especially in red saturated areas) that it must be just about impossible to find such efficiencies.

    Also thinking -- you should just use the iMovie default output for "Full Quality DV" and then let iDVD or Toast figure out the best way to squeeze it onto your DVD media.
     
  25. aloofman macrumors 68020

    aloofman

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    #25
    Your basic idea is true, but for practical purposes, there are so many variables that can affect picture quality. A VHS copy of a well-shot video can look better than a DV video shot by an amateur. There ARE noise issues with VHS, but the higher-end compression software handles them surprisingly well. My experience with trying to process VHS footage has been that video sync can be really awful, audio levels tend to be too low, and the top and bottom edges are often so glitchy that you have to crop the frame.

    Don't make the mistake of lumping all analog formats together when it comes to picture quality. A lot of broadcast television is still shot on analog tape formats and it looks great. A lot of amateur video is shot on DV and looks like crap. (And, all of them are trumped by 35mm film, which is, of course, analog.) What it comes down to is that the better the production value of the footage, the better it will compress.
     

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