I told you to buy Apple 2 weeks ago

Discussion in 'Community' started by PalmHarborTchr, Jun 16, 2004.

  1. PalmHarborTchr macrumors member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2003
    Location:
    Florida
    #1
    Today apple (appl) closed at $32.74 per share...when I suggested it was
    going up and if you had confidence in the company's growth, but the
    stock now....I got a lot of negative feedback. Had you bought 500 shares
    when I suggested it you would have a paper profit of $1500...enough
    for a new iMac. Negative people are generally not winners in the stock
    market. Apple is a very sucessful technology company...it is no small
    feat to beat Sony Electronics in the market of personal electronics
    but Apple has about a 75 share of that market. Who do you know that
    has eaten Sony's lunch in the last 15 years? :D
     
  2. Mr. Anderson Moderator emeritus

    Mr. Anderson

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2001
    Location:
    VA
    #2
    Good news for Apple, but what's with the 'I told you so attitude'?

    D
     
  3. King Cobra macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2002
    #3
    Wait, don't close the thread yet...

    Apple's stocks usually hit a minimum right before an expo. So, most likely, they will be at a minimum right before June 28, 2004, and then they'll go up again. I'm telling you now to buy 1000 shares of Apple stock on June 26 or June 27. And even if you do, I'm going to post a thread about what you should have done back then within a month from now when you're all suckers and few people give a damn.

    All right, now shut it away. :D
     
  4. rainman::|:| macrumors 603

    rainman::|:|

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2002
    Location:
    iowa
    #4
    well hot damn, i'm going to take EVERY stock tip posted semi-anonymously on the internet! Why didn't i think of that before??!

    paul
     
  5. themadchemist macrumors 68030

    themadchemist

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2003
    Location:
    Chi Town
    #5
    Take comfort in the fact that you bought the stock, my friend...You DID by the stock, right?!
     
  6. jxyama macrumors 68040

    jxyama

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2003
    #6
    oh, geez, so one would be a winner in the stock market if one was a positive person? :rolleyes:

    did *you* buy apple?
     
  7. themadchemist macrumors 68030

    themadchemist

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2003
    Location:
    Chi Town
    #7
    Yeah, as long as you believe things work out for the best, then they do. My positive thoughts once caused a three-day rally in Motorola stock in the face of lower-than-expected earnings, delays on new chips, manufacturing problems, and malfunctions with a new line of their cell phones.
     
  8. Sun Baked macrumors G5

    Sun Baked

    Joined:
    May 19, 2002
    #8
    The pointless "I told you so..." vengance of the stock promoter in action.

    Join Raging Bull and see thousands of people promote stocks that promptly fall, drastically.

    ---

    And at least you said "paper profit" -- because you haven't made anything until you sell.

    Which is why some said it's a great time to sell and actually convert paper profits into real money.
     
  9. mj_1903 macrumors 6502a

    mj_1903

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2003
    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    #9
    Actually from recent history Apple's stock usually hits a plateau right before an expo and then _falls_ afterwards. Only Macworld SF has broken that trend so far.

    And as for the original poster, I still have my Apple stock that I bought when Apple's net value was less than the worth of the cash that it had on hand. Did you happen to buy some then?
     
  10. bousozoku Moderator emeritus

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2002
    Location:
    Gone but not forgotten.
    #10
    It would be good to see what the price will be next week when they announce results from the first week of iTMS for UK, France, and Germany.

    I expect that it will drop dramatically after WWDC for no good reason since it usually does.

    Besides, wasn't everyone positive when the stock was over $150 per share and they had a 2 for 1 split? What happened? It dropped all the way to $13 and change, eventually and it's part of the way back up now. I've been kicking myself for buying a computer instead of stock back in 1995. Oh well--I guess I wasn't positive enough.
     
  11. zimv20 macrumors 601

    zimv20

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2002
    Location:
    toronto
    #11
    500 shares? so "invest" some $15k to make $1500, when it could have just as easily lost that much?

    as i implied in the other thread you started about this, you know squat about investing. you're simply gambling.

    now go play some blackjack. i'll be back in two week to tell you that you should have taken my advice.
     
  12. etoiles macrumors 6502a

    etoiles

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2002
    Location:
    Where the air is crisp
    #12
    there is always a little bit of gambling (or 'risk taking') when you put your money into the stock market. The bigger the risk, the bigger the POTENTIAL reward. So never invest more than you can afford to lose...and also, remember the famous "do your own research" rule.
     
  13. cjc343 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2004
    Location:
    In the apple store, in front of a G5.
    #13
    In reply to everyone who asked whether our resident source for stock tips bought apple stock:

    It is illegal to suggest that people buy stock that you own shares of in the US. It is also illegal to suggest that people buy stock in a company, and then go buy it yourself.
     
  14. sambo. macrumors regular

    sambo.

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2004
    Location:
    outback, far from the surf
    #14
    just ask Martha Stewart...

    eh? so, if i buy stock in a company and it atarts to do well, if i tell a mate and he buys, i am in breach of the law in the US?
    whatever happened to the "Land of the Free"?

    either way, i have only ever owned one lot of shares, bought at AUD$1.80. it instantly dropped to AUD$1.30, 366 days later (long enough so i avoided Capital Gains Tax in Oz) i sold them at $3.20. that paid for a good chunk of my travels.........

    the stock markets are basically casinos, anyone who tries to tell you different is a liar. :eek:
     
  15. wdlove macrumors P6

    wdlove

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2002
    #15
    If I had the money, the best philosophy is to purchase a stock from a company that you know something about and trust. Then to hold on to the stock for the long term.
     
  16. zimv20 macrumors 601

    zimv20

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2002
    Location:
    toronto
    #16
    that's not true, though. and i'm not lying :)

    trading short term is akin to gambling. holding long positions, especially across a well-diversified portfolio, is one of the safest ways to invest. it also has decent returns (averaging some 7-8% / year over the long term).

    that's why 401k*'s work so well. you dollar cost average over a long time, allow it time to grow, including reinvesting dividends, plus it's tax-deferred. solid returns, low risk.

    * the common name for a certain type of US retirement plan, for those who have no reason to be familiar w/ it
     
  17. Sun Baked macrumors G5

    Sun Baked

    Joined:
    May 19, 2002
    #17
    It's only true if you don't know the industry, the company, and management team's ability to follow through on their "plans"

    Investing money in an industry, company, and management team you know nothing about could be considered loading your cash into the slot machine on Wallstreet.
     
  18. zimv20 macrumors 601

    zimv20

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2002
    Location:
    toronto
    #18
    there's mutual funds and CFPs, CFAs, etc to assist w/ such things, including diversifying. "eggs in one basket" thing, no one recommending investing too much in any one stock, industry, instrument, fund, bond, etc.

    or are we paranoid it's all rigged and the little guy can't win?
     
  19. topicolo macrumors 68000

    topicolo

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2002
    Location:
    Ottawa, ON
    #19
    uhh... no. It's just unethical to promote a stock and not reveal your holdings in the company if you have any.

    If this were true, half of the analysts that ever get interviewed on CNBC will be behind bars (not that you should be listening to their gibberish anyway).
     
  20. themadchemist macrumors 68030

    themadchemist

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2003
    Location:
    Chi Town
    #20
    Hmmm, that's what I was thinking.

    Some relevant links:

    SEC Speech

    Excerpt:
    In the Lowe case, the Supreme Court interpreted the Investment Advisers Act of 1940 as applying to persons engaged in the investment advisory profession who provide personalized investment advice based on the needs of a particular client. The Court stated that business or financial publications that provided impersonal investment advice fell within the publisher’s exclusion from investment adviser registration, provided that the publications were "bona fide," containing "disinterested commentary and analysis as opposed to promotional material disseminated by a tout," and had a "regular and general circulation" that was "not timed to specific market activity, or to events affecting or having the ability to affect the securities industry."


    The SEC recently filed a case that raises the question whether a person offering investment advice over the Internet that is alleged to be false and misleading may rely on the "publisher’s" exclusion from Advisers Act regulation. In the Tokyo Joe case, the Commission alleged that Tokyo Joe offered real-time investment advice over the Internet in the form of stock recommendations and charged subscribers $100-$200 per month to get the advice. Tokyo Joe provided stock picks via his own website, e-mails to subscribers and on a real-time chat room within his web site where he discussed stocks. The complaint alleged that Tokyo Joe engaged in a fraudulent "scalping" scheme by (1) trading ahead of his Internet recommendations without disclosure to subscribers, (2) posting false performance results and (3) recommending the stock of an issuer without disclosing that he had received compensation from the issuer.


    Based on these allegations, the SEC charged Tokyo Joe with acting as an investment adviser and with violating the antifraud provisions of the Advisers Act and the Exchange Act. Under the Lowe analysis, the first question is whether Tokyo Joe provided personalized investment advice. Can chat room communications over the Internet be sufficiently personalized or individualized to create the basis for an advisory relationship with a subscriber? The second question is, even without personalized advice, can a publication be considered "bona fide" if the advice offered is not "disinterested" or is false and misleading? In other words, is someone who provides investment advice over the Internet – although it may be fraudulent – exempt from the antifraud provisions of the Advisers Act because his Internet postings constitute a "bona fide" news publication?

    How the SEC Protects Investors...

    Excerpt:

    Investment Advisers Act of 1940


    This law regulates investment advisers. With certain exceptions, this Act requires that firms or sole practitioners compensated for advising others about securities investments must register with the SEC and conform to regulations designed to protect investors. Since the Act was amended in 1996, generally only advisers who have at least $25 million of assets under management or advise a registered investment company must register with the Commission. The full text of this Act is available at: http://www.law.uc.edu/CCL/InvAdvAct/index.html.* (The SEC does not control or maintain this site.)
    --

    I think this covers some of it.
     
  21. Phobophobia macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2003
    #21
    I bought at 23 and have held on to it ever since. There is no reason not to get in on the stock.
     
  22. BornAgainMac macrumors 603

    BornAgainMac

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2004
    Location:
    Florida Resident
    #22
    I saw that post. I believe it would go up too. The negative people sometimes are right, so you never know. Apple is looking good and I don't see it going down much. The people that banked the most were the ones that purchased stock just before the first week of the iTunes store.

    Everytime I read about a music store online, I always read about Apple's iTunes music store. It's free advertisement. Also because it's the biggest and most popular, people select that. People at least in the U.S. tend to be lemmings and do what the masses do. What is killing Apple right now is that they can't make enough product to meet the demand on several product lines.
     
  23. zimv20 macrumors 601

    zimv20

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2002
    Location:
    toronto
    #23
    there're are plenty of reasons. it _is_ possible to make money on AAPL, it's also possible to lose it. what was your target sell price when you bought it?

    you've got a nice gain on your buy, you might want to collect your profits.
     
  24. topicolo macrumors 68000

    topicolo

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2002
    Location:
    Ottawa, ON
    #24
    I can think of a couple:

    1) the recent G5 upgrades are much less than promised. The mac fan base is mostly disappointed and this may translate to lower than predicted sales.
    2) No G5 powerbooks in sight--A lot of people are going to hold off their purchases until they come out
    3) MASSIVE hole in pricing between the eMac and the Powermacs--discourages midrange buyers from considering apple
    4) Ipod mini sales are still being hampered by lack of HD supply

    Apple's stock is very high right now due to high expectations that all of these problems will work out. Chances are, not all of them will and apple may disappoint on their next earnings release, possibly causing a large price correction.

    My opinoin is to hold it if you have it, but don't buy now if you don't have it.

    PalmHarborTchr: a profit of 10% is nothing. By the time you apply capital gains taxes and commissions, your gain will be worth very little. You would actually have something to brag about if Apple shot up 30+%
     
  25. 512ke macrumors 6502a

    512ke

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2003
    #25
    Check out Apple's stock in the five year window in yahoo finance. It looks exactly like what it is...a roller coaster. With 1 difference. On a roller coaster, you always get on and off at the same point. With the stock market, you never know...
     

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