iBook as A Server

Discussion in 'General Mac Discussion' started by iHatePCs, Mar 6, 2005.

  1. iHatePCs macrumors member

    iHatePCs

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2004
    Location:
    www.macrumors.com
    #1
    Hey, I have an Airport Extreme giving internet to a desktop PC (By an Etherner Cord) and to an iBook G4 (Wireless)

    Right now I'm pretty sure it says my iBook is running as the server. How can I make the dektop the server, will it make a difference? Thanks :)
     
  2. Mechcozmo macrumors 603

    Mechcozmo

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2004
    #2
    Why would it say the iBook is a server?
    The Airport Express just gives out IPs...
     
  3. iHatePCs thread starter macrumors member

    iHatePCs

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2004
    Location:
    www.macrumors.com
    #3
    Well, if I go under network and click servers, my iBooks HD appears there. :confused:
     
  4. Mechcozmo macrumors 603

    Mechcozmo

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2004
    #4
    Haha!

    That doesn't mean its a server.... that just allows you to connect to it as a hard drive... it will serve its hard drive to you... not a REAL server. :D
     
  5. iHatePCs thread starter macrumors member

    iHatePCs

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2004
    Location:
    www.macrumors.com
    #5
    Oh! Hahaha I feel uncomforatably dumb now... woops! :p
     
  6. superbovine macrumors 68030

    superbovine

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2003
    #6
    You should read about the conceptual concept of the client/server model. You might learn something.
     
  7. Mechcozmo macrumors 603

    Mechcozmo

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2004
    #7

    I was trying to explain it in a very simplified manner. That's literally what the "Server" list is, in my experiences-- the hard drives on your home network.
     
  8. stevep macrumors 6502a

    stevep

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2004
    Location:
    UK
    #8
    On a typical home network, where computers are all connected in peer-to-peer fashion they all have the same 'status', and operate independently of one another. Each one acts as a 'server' and a 'client', depending on what you're actually doing, eg pulling or pushing files from one machine to another.
    In a typical large corporate network (a proper Server-Workstation setup), you will have a central server (maybe more than one) to handle user data files, user profiles and log-on scripts, maybe email etc etc.
    So the word 'server' has different meanings depending on the type of network you're talking about. The good news is that, for a small home peer-to-peer network you don't really have to worry about it too much. Its just part of the learning curve (and I'm not at the top by any means). If you want to probe a little deeper into networks then OS X is probably the most painless OS to use. And finally, if you've got your iBook talking to your PC then pat yourself on the back - you're a network engineer!
     

Share This Page