if you want cloning, then what animals?

Discussion in 'Community' started by jefhatfield, Jul 25, 2002.

  1. jefhatfield Retired

    jefhatfield

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2000
    #1
    i would like to see the eohippus, the 14" inch tall morning horse of millions of years ago

    japanese scientists found a eohippus carcass along with the wooly mammoth and from these parts, still somewhat fresh in the snow, a clone possibly could be made

    i wonder if and when that can be done?

    i don't think this is playing god anymore than what we do to breed dogs into certain types breeds which natural selection would have never come up with....dogs with extra short legs, prone to disease, bad temperaments, etc... to please dog breeders and give fame to their creators

    this was done to great success in victorian england where a large portion of these breeds came from

    cloning humans does bring up some issues of religious significance

    but, anyway, what would you like to see?
     
  2. MacAztec macrumors 68040

    MacAztec

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2001
    Location:
    San Luis Obispo, CA
    #2
    Uhhh....

    A Terradactile. One of those dinasaur things. Or an ancient day alligator
     
  3. Durandal7 macrumors 68040

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2001
    #3
    A mastadon or a trilobyte would be good enough for me.
     
  4. mymemory macrumors 68020

    mymemory

    Joined:
    May 9, 2001
    Location:
    Miami
    #4
    I'm agains cloning. If you clone something it means that I can kill them all with out problem because there shold have a copy of it in the laboratory, so the hunters can go a kill the tigers and elephants. Just imagine that.

    If I clone something I would have to deal with:
    1. endogamia (relations between the same family).
    2. the education of the animal, many species needs to learn behaviours from the older ones in order to survive (ex. migration), how do we know about that?

    So, cloning animals is not the solution, mey be really old ones but not tigers or pandas.
     
  5. Sun Baked macrumors G5

    Sun Baked

    Joined:
    May 19, 2002
    #5
    How bout a bunch of Eagles, I'm sort of getting tired of eating one of the runner-ups for national bird for Thanksgiving every year. :D
     
  6. Durandal7 macrumors 68040

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2001
    #6
    This thread is about really old animals , mostly those who are extinct. No point in cloning what's already here.
     
  7. jefhatfield thread starter Retired

    jefhatfield

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2000
    #7
    whoa!

    what about cloning sarah michelle gellar?
     
  8. Mr. Anderson Moderator emeritus

    Mr. Anderson

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2001
    Location:
    VA
    #8
    human cloning will cause more problems than we need right now - besides by the time you could legally *do* anything with your 10 smg clones, you'd be 19 years older - you'd die happy:D

    but back to topic - when they get the Wooly Mammoth cloned and it grows to full size, that will be cool. That will probably be the largest cloned animal any of us will ever see, I don't think we'll ever see a Jurasic Park - more like Pleistocene Park....
     
  9. ShaolinMiddleFinger macrumors 6502a

    ShaolinMiddleFinger

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2001
    #9
    .....like when she first started buffy....nowadays she's skinny as a bone
     
  10. Backtothemac macrumors 601

    Backtothemac

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2002
    Location:
    San Destin Florida
    #10
    How about a sabertooth tiger. That would be cool. A supercroc. (do a search for it it was on discovery). Velocoraptor, just to see if they were as bad A$$ as they made them in Jurrasic Park.
     
  11. topicolo macrumors 68000

    topicolo

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2002
    Location:
    Ottawa, ON
    #11
    Yeah, but hasn't Jurassic Park 1,2, & 3 taught you anything? If you clone smart predators, they'll always break free and hunt everybody down, killing them in a spectacular way, except for one or two people who survive till the end so that they can make another sequel.
     
  12. topicolo macrumors 68000

    topicolo

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2002
    Location:
    Ottawa, ON
  13. Mr. Anderson Moderator emeritus

    Mr. Anderson

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2001
    Location:
    VA
    #13
    being chased by a bunch of SMGs? Ha, now that would be funny - and she's what - 5'-2", >100#? Well, if it was Buffy and they all had a stake - might not be so funny......
     
  14. mischief macrumors 68030

    mischief

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2001
    Location:
    Santa Cruz Ca
    #14
    Okay, another little dose of reality:

    Veloceraptor was only 3' tall. Somehow a 36" hyper-intelligent pseudo-reptile is a bit less intimidating than the 6' version done for the movie.

    Also: Whole animal cloning is a crude process at best that has a rediculously high failure rate. Dolly wasn't the first or even fifth attempt. Well over 50 tries were made, it only worked once and the sheep didn't survive very long.

    The process requires whole, un-corrupted DNA in complete sequence and an appropriate host. Can YOU think of an animal alive that could support a Mastodon Fetus?

    All in all I find that genetic manipulation of an existing species is far more promising and stable.

    BTW: There is a direct corrolation between the complexity of an animal's genetics and the success rate of cloning. Plants are easy, they have a very small amount of DNA to work from and very simple tissues. A human is one of the most intricate organisms yet to reproduce en masse.... the failure rate of human cloning would be astronomical!

    Oh, also: Cloning plants is done a bit differently than the Dolly Approach where an ovum is flushed, then injected with complete DNA resulting in immediate mitosis. Plant cloning is done (at it's most advanced technique) by growing the plant-equivalent of stem cells from a seed in a rotating horizontal flask of nutrient solution under good light such that a ball of undifferentiated cells is formed instead of a standard plant embryo. When a certain mass is reached the ball of cells is cut up into 4 to 16 evenly sized pieces and put back into rotating flasks of nutriets, one piece per flask. In this manner up to 64 plants can be grown from a single seed.
     
  15. mymemory macrumors 68020

    mymemory

    Joined:
    May 9, 2001
    Location:
    Miami
    #15
    That would be worth it:D

    But is true, she was cuter 2 years ago.

    I would like to clone a Mira Sorvino too :rolleyes:
     
  16. Gelfin macrumors 68020

    Gelfin

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2001
    Location:
    Denver, CO
    #16
    Re: Okay, another little dose of reality:

    Fertilizing an egg the old-fashioned way also has a ridiculously high failure rate. Dolly was the first success, but to say "it only worked once" is a mischaracterization. Other animals have been cloned since, including other sheep. And as far as "didn't survive very long," how do you figure? Dolly is still alive. As of earlier this year she was showing some signs of premature arthritis, but scientists weren't sure if the cloning process was responsible. Also, premature arthritis may or may not be associated with early onset of other age-related conditions, much less premature death. Most interesting is the recent finding that a clone of an existing animal does not necessarily look exactly like the original. A cloned cow, for instance, wouldn't be expected to have the same pattern of spots.

    The first point is a good one. The ability to extract intact DNA from a long-dead animal has not been demonstrated and is likely to be very difficult, perhaps impossible. But as for the latter point... um, elephant? Mastodons weren't so big as to make that a problem.
     
  17. topicolo macrumors 68000

    topicolo

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2002
    Location:
    Ottawa, ON
    #17
    Hell yeah, she's hot. Almost hotter than Catherine Zeta-Jones
     
  18. topicolo macrumors 68000

    topicolo

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2002
    Location:
    Ottawa, ON
    #18
    Re: Re: Okay, another little dose of reality:

    What were the suspects for causing problems with clones? Where they related to the telomeres or the methylation of the DNA or something? I'm intrigued now but I can't remember any of the papers I've read on the subject.
     
  19. mischief macrumors 68030

    mischief

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2001
    Location:
    Santa Cruz Ca
    #19
    Re: Re: Okay, another little dose of reality:

    iginally posted by Gelfin [/i]


    Fertilizing an egg the old-fashioned way also has a ridiculously high failure rate. Dolly was the first success, but to say "it only worked once" is a mischaracterization. Other animals have been cloned since, including other sheep. And as far as "didn't survive very long," how do you figure? Dolly is still alive. As of earlier this year she was showing some signs of premature arthritis, but scientists weren't sure if the cloning process was responsible. Also, premature arthritis may or may not be associated with early onset of other age-related conditions, much less premature death. Most interesting is the recent finding that a clone of an existing animal does not necessarily look exactly like the original. A cloned cow, for instance, wouldn't be expected to have the same pattern of spots.



    The first point is a good one. The ability to extract intact DNA from a long-dead animal has not been demonstrated and is likely to be very difficult, perhaps impossible. But as for the latter point... um, elephant? Mastodons weren't so big as to make that a problem.
    [/QUOTE]

    Whoops! My bad. I could have sworn Dolly had kacked already. Huh, so much for that hypothesis. I still feel that the kind of "cloning" used for Dolly was crude and rather brutal in it's execution. My Bad again, I had forgotten about the various other barn animals that have been cloned. Maybe I should wait until I've finished my morning coffee before opening my mouth. :D ;)

    I have always been a firm believer in Nature's ability to screw with human desire to crank out identical ANYTHING and I find it amusing in the extreme.

    The failure rate of "standard" reproduction didn't enter my mind because it's not a production process with inherent cost unless you're paying people to breed!:eek: But yes, the failure rate of even natural embryo's is suprisingly high. As for the modern versus extinct pachyderm thing... It was about the fact that finding a suitable host would be a major concern.... I still feel that a full term Mastodon would be larger than a full term African Elephant.

    Still, I feel that the "Dolly" method of cloning is not the most efficient we could devise and Tissue Cloning is a better use of funding. Whole Animal cloning is better entertainment than product design unless you're actually making new species in the process, in which case I'm all for it! we've done enoughkilling off species and then sitting around guiltily with our thumbs up our butts while the ecosystems we've destabilized fall appart because we're trying to keep them the same!!! Time to actively fix our mistakes and not pretend that if we try to keep it from changing it will magically reproduce what we've killed off and ballance out!!

    Geez, I'm one for rants today.:D ;) :p
     
  20. jefhatfield thread starter Retired

    jefhatfield

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2000
    #20
    Re: Okay, another little dose of reality:

    hey look, i know that

    you do the sarah michelle gellar clones and i will be the tester and tell you if she came out alright:p
     

Share This Page