Impossible or not?

Discussion in 'Mac Apps and Mac App Store' started by yippy, Oct 21, 2004.

  1. yippy macrumors 68020

    yippy

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2004
    Location:
    Chicago, IL
    #1
    I was wondering if anyone knew if I could run Proe Wildfire on a Mac running 10.3.5. Here are the software requirements. It does not officialy support Mac, but it does Linux and Unix and Mac OS X has a Unix core so I am hoping it is possible.

    I want this because I am using this program in a class and would like to be able to use it on my home comp instead of having to go to a university computer lab.

    I get it free through my university so I am willing to try things since there is not risk to me.

    Thanks
    Kai
     
  2. hotwire132002 macrumors 65816

    hotwire132002

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2004
    Location:
    Cadillac, MI
    #2
    I would think it's possible--I've heard of people running Unix/Linux software of Max OS X. I have no idea how, but it could very well be possible.
     
  3. Logik macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2004
    #3
    VERY unlikely. it would have to be compiled for OS X. the only reason a lot of linux/unix apps run on the mac is if they're recompiled in a PowerPC format. Remember, just because linux and unix can run something, and os x is unix.. they still contain different processors from the x86 linux versions (which most commercial linux apps are written for)... i'd say you're pretty screwed unless it's java.. in which case you'd stand a chance but this doesn't look like it is..

    sorry man, you won't get anywhere
     
  4. hotwire132002 macrumors 65816

    hotwire132002

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    #4
    I didn't think of that--Just out of curiousity, if there's a PowerPC version, would it run on OS X?
     
  5. Logik macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2004
    #5
    probably not.. it would be compiled for powerpc BUT it wouldn't be compiled against OS X's libraries. which would mean it's probably for linux or some other form of unix and would only work on that linux/unix distribution.

    you're kinda outta luck i think. if you can get a x86 linux copy you can pick up cheap wintel machines pretty cheap .. i am sure you could find someone willing to give you one if you don't already own one.
     
  6. Makosuke macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2001
    Location:
    The Cool Part of CA, USA
    #6
    Although it is possible to run some generic PPC-unix programs using the X11 implementation on OSX, I believe they need to have a version compiled specifically for that (not really my area, though, so I'm not positive; are there generic PPC-unix-X11 apps?).

    And, although I've certainly seen high-end software packages along the lines of that that have an X11 version for OSX, the PDF you linked doesn't mention any PPC processors, and only lists versions for HP-UX on their PA processors and Redhat Linux on x86. Meaning they likely only sell compiled versions, so it sounds an awful lot like you're out of luck.

    The fact that the only supported graphics cards they list are workstation-class cards (Fire and Quadro series) doesn't sound too encouraging, either.

    Maybe you aught to send them a letter and encourage others to do so, though; now that Apple is making significant inroads into the scientific workstation market, has a decent unix X11 implementation, and an inexpensive 64-bit processor line to run it on, perhaps they'd consider a port. Other similar companies certainly have.
     
  7. yippy thread starter macrumors 68020

    yippy

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2004
    Location:
    Chicago, IL
    #7
    It doesn't work :( . I suppose I could install an x86 emulator and Red Hat on that. But I don't think it would be usable.

    One question, what is the difference between a workstation class graphics card and a normal/gaming card? Oh, and why is the Sun Blade that I use for school only 650Mhz yet costs like $1600 today?
     
  8. pyrrhusmj macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2004
    Location:
    Fort Worth, TX
    #8
    I have 3 words for you. Yellow Dog Linux. Have you tried YDL? They have versions that will run on PPC's through the G4 and a g5 version in Beta. Odds are the software you need doesn't get down to the HAL, so it may work.


    Michael
     
  9. Studawg7 macrumors regular

    Joined:
    May 15, 2004
    Location:
    Cville, VA
    #9
    if you find a solution that works let me know! there are lots of unix programs in the engineering world that i would love to run on a mac.
     
  10. yellow Moderator emeritus

    yellow

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2003
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #10
    Because, just like the MHz myth betwixt the Intel world and the Apple (motorola/IBM) world, the MHz of the processors that Sun uses should not be compared with those of it's brethren on a 1:1 ratio.
     
  11. Makosuke macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2001
    Location:
    The Cool Part of CA, USA
    #11
    In reality, not a whole lot, though functionally it can be significant. In general terms, the biggest difference isn't the basic hardware--which is similar at least up through the midrange--but the tuning (mainly in firmware and drivers, I believe). In the case of gamer cards, they're tuned for performace in games; workstation cards are tuned for CAD and 3D design apps.

    Each is, I'd expect, better for what it is intended for, though workstation cards generally cost more.

    At the high end, there are usually workstation-class cards that go somewhat beyond any equivalent for the consumer market, although at that point you're looking at $1000 and up (and consumer tech will likely catch up quickly). Still, the lack of workstation cards on the Mac is at least a percieved disadvantage for people who look for or need those for their work.

    For purposes of illustration, here's a page that offers info on flashing gaming cards into workstation cards, implying there isn't much difference in most cases. It also has a link to a rundown of the current state of workstation cards from ATI, NVidia, and Matrox:

    http://www.rojakpot.com/default.aspx?location=3&var1=105&var2=1

    Oh, and on another topic, Yellow Dog Linux on the Mac wouldn't help any, because that package doesn't have a PPC Linux version listed--only x86 Redhat.
     
  12. pyrrhusmj macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2004
    Location:
    Fort Worth, TX
    #12
    Well in that case, just find a cheap PC. You can get some quality PC's that exceed basic requirements for a couple hundred. I built my last PC for $250. It's nothing fancy, but runs my vpn software for work and a couple servers :), I just wouldn't use it as a serious gaming machine.



    Michael
     
  13. Logik macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2004
    #13
    yellow dog linux will not make a bit of difference. you literally WOULD have to run a pc emulator like virtual pc, install red hat or other x86 distro, then install the application.

    it's worthless to even try like i said.. it isn't compiled for os x. it will not work, period. it never will work unless they compile a version FOR os x. it won't work on YDL either because it is not compiled for YDL..

    for example.. you have a linux application. we'll call it... GNOME or KDE... you can compile it on an x86 machine... but it'll only run on x86 machines... not YDL on a PPC.. and vice versa. linux != linux... it would have to be compiled for that particular processor type..
     

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