In poor job market, a rush to nursing

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by wdlove, Aug 11, 2004.

  1. wdlove macrumors P6

    wdlove

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    #1
  2. maxvamp macrumors 6502a

    maxvamp

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    #2
    It Would be nice....

    My wife is an experienced Phlebotomist, and is looking for a Phlebotomy job in the Denver area... So far, no luck.

    It would be nice to see this nursing boom a little sooner than later.

    Max.
     
  3. Elan0204 macrumors 65816

    Elan0204

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    I have heard people recommending nursing to people entering college since the job market for everything else is so poor right now. It seems to be an attractive career choice at this time, with good pay and a rewarding experience.
     
  4. Elan0204 macrumors 65816

    Elan0204

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    edit: Sorry about the double post. MacRumors.com completely stopped working for me for about 10 minutes, and the home page still won't load right.
     
  5. Daveman Deluxe macrumors 68000

    Daveman Deluxe

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    #5
    I read in Reader's Digest yesterday that between 2002 and 2012, the nursing field is expected to require over 600,000 new people to fill the jobs available. Similar story with the number of post-secondary teachers (good news for me).
     
  6. Dale Sorel macrumors 6502a

    Dale Sorel

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    My sister is a nurse. She can work anywhere she wants :)
     
  7. Brother Michael macrumors 6502a

    Brother Michael

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    Glad to see it.

    I don't know about you guys, but I was very worried about the nursing population in Ohio, considering that the average nurse is 40ish and they discourage young people from entering a career in nursing.

    Mike
     
  8. noel4r macrumors 6502a

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    yup, and i bet she gets compensated very well too. the upside to a nursing career is the flexibility (some work 12 hour shifts, 3 days a week), salary, job security and the downside is the actual job itself. i know a lot of nurses and they all say it's a very dirty job. a glorified maid, some say.
     
  9. wdlove thread starter macrumors P6

    wdlove

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    #9
    As mentioned above the average age of nurses today are in their 50's. So retirements will also cause a shortage. As I mentioned there will be a marked increased need for nurses when the Baby Boom Generation retires. This increase of nurses couldn't have at a better time.
     
  10. Dale Sorel macrumors 6502a

    Dale Sorel

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    She went back to school to get her Bachelors and is now a Critical Care Nurse. But for what she does (save lives daily), she's terribly underpaid.

    About the glorified maid part, she gives orders to MDs all the time.
     
  11. virividox macrumors 601

    virividox

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    people in my country have been going abroad as nurses for ages, many doctors even take up nursing because the doctor market in the philipppines pays less than the nurses abroad (for public hospitals)
     
  12. cebritt macrumors member

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    #12
    Nursing most flexible career in medicine!

    My wife is a Critical Care Clinical Nurse Specialist and I keep telling her that they could attract more people to nursing if they promoted it as the most flexible career in medicine.

    Opportunities range from LVN ($35K) to Nurse Anesthetist ($150K) to hospital management. Add shift differentials for nights and weekends. And Nurse Practitioneer is better than Physicians Assistant. If you don't want to be a floor nurse, however, you should get a masters degree.

    Remember, if you want a quick answer, ask your doctor. If you want the right answer, ask your nurse!
     
  13. wdlove thread starter macrumors P6

    wdlove

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    The hospitals that I'm familiar with already have a differential for evenings, nights, and weekends. Nurse Practitioners are better trained than a physician assistant, they are nurses first.

    Many doctors will admit that nurses have saved them from many mistakes. Getting to know a patient at the bedside makes a big difference.
     
  14. Thomas Veil macrumors 68020

    Thomas Veil

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    I don't want to deride the noble profession of nursing -- my wife is a nurse -- but whenever I hear a young person talk about getting into it, I warn them: it's a very hard profession nowadays.

    I worked at a hospital for a long time, and I can tell you the job has, in a number of ways, gone to hell in a handcart. Used to be, you saw a lot of older nurses working on the units with the patients. Now, nurses burn out and retire early, or move on to office jobs (educators, administrators, etc.), because they simply can't handle it for their entire careers. Where they used to have one nurse for every three or four patients, now one nurse may handle as many as ten to fifteen. That produces low job satisfaction, because nurses tend to like to spend time with their patients. Nowadays they rarely get the chance. It's more like run in, do a quick assessment, give some meds, and run out.

    For many, the rewards of caring for people, making them better, outweigh these negatives. But usually, it's only for a time. Sooner or later, the job just gets too hard.

    If anyone does want to become a nurse, they shouldn't settle for LPN. Nowadays that qualifies you to do simple tasks in a nursing home. Even RNs don't enjoy the advantage they used to. If you truly want to get a good job and be promotable, you need a BSN at least, and many who position themselves for administration someday have MSNs. (No, not that MSN.)

    Anyway, it's something to put a lot of thought into before you go leaping into it.
     
  15. Dale Sorel macrumors 6502a

    Dale Sorel

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    My sis decided when she was 18 years old that she wanted to be a nurse. She's 41 now and loves it more than ever.

    It isn't easy, but thank God there're people out there like my sister :)
     
  16. wdlove thread starter macrumors P6

    wdlove

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    No job that is really worth doing and is meaningful is easy. That is why it's called work. I agree nursing is hard, but when you have a patient say thank you it really makes the day. Computers and disposable items have made the job a little easier. At least in our state there is legislation to state what is a safe nurse patient ratio.
     
  17. Stelliform macrumors 68000

    Stelliform

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    We have a pretty severe nurse shortage here in our town also. A local school advertising to get new nursing students had an angle I found amusing, "Nurses are already in high demand, and as millions more baby boomers age and require care from nurses the demand for nurses will only get larger."

    I wonder how the Baby boomers feel about the implication of their generation heading to a nursing home. ;)
     
  18. wdlove thread starter macrumors P6

    wdlove

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    The nursing care needed by Baby Boomers won't just be nursing homes. The idea now is for the elderly to remain in their homes as long as possible. There will be nurses needed in hospitals for acute care. A growing need is for community health for nurses to visit patient's in the home like my wife.
     
  19. Toreador93 macrumors regular

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    #19
    I'm an M.E. major...and got quite alarmed when one of the M.E. staff at my Univ decided to take up Nursing.

    Maybe I'll build wheelchairs and hospital beds for a living :)
     
  20. Chip NoVaMac macrumors G3

    Chip NoVaMac

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    #20
    Let me say first, thank Heaven for Nurses.

    In an area like DC they are the underpaid workhorses. Hospitals here work them till the point that they can get full-time benefits. And if not they are worked 12 to 18 hours. This does no one any good.

    I am not talking about some disaster that requires medical staff to provide care. I am talking about profits that healthcare companies get by working people close to death, and to our deaths. Nurses are not given their due.

    I can say I wish all nurses could be as good at the nurses at INOVA Fair Oaks. Professional and personal. In my other half's experience last month, I was treated with respect as any family member (legal or otherwise) as one could hope for.
     
  21. Abstract macrumors Penryn

    Abstract

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    #21
    What do these stand for? LPN, LVN, BSN, MSN, and what's a Nurse Anaesthetist, and why do they get paid $150K like someone mentioned? Is it that important a job?

    Anyway, there's a dire need for nurses in Canada. The old provincial government cut back on healthcare in Ontario (the province where Toronto and Ottawa is located ;) ) some 5-6 years ago, healthcare went to the crapper. Then they tried to hire lots of new nurses a year before provincial elections. :rolleyes:

    And the reason why nurses "burn out" easily, as someone mentioned, is probably the same reason why hospital doctors burn out easily. They go into hospital work very Gung Ho about it, but after 5 years, many go open up a private practice. They simply work too hard. Yes, they get paid fairly well, but they work so hard that doctors also get sick more often than in other jobs because of stress, and they're allowed to be sick a lot. I believe I heard that the average doctor leaves hospital practice after 6 years or so because they can't be arsed anymore. Its probably the same as nursing.
     
  22. wdlove thread starter macrumors P6

    wdlove

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    LPN is a Licensed Practical Nurse, LVP is a licensed Vocational Nurse. They are equal in status. It's usually a twelve months course of study. They are being phased out. BSN is a Bachelor of Science in Nursing which trains person to take state boards to become a Registered Nurse. It's a 4 year course of study. The most popular and recognizable way to become a Registered Nurse. MSN is a Masters of Science in Nursing. It's usually a two year course of study. It trains a registered nurse or advanced training. Many in supervisory roles. Examples are Nurse Midwives to deliver babies. A Nurse Practitioner sees patients, can do exams and diagnose under the direction of a physician. They work in a variety of healthcare settings. In some states like Massachusetts they can prescribe medications. A Nurse Anesthetist can either be trained as a BSN or MSN, most just a BSN with specialized training that can lead to a MSN. They work under the direction of a Anesthesiologist. It is the person that does direct care of the patient during surgery. They get paid that amount because it is a high technical and specialized area.

    My wife is thinking about becoming a Nurse Practitioner. Many have said she is good at diagnosing a situation, a very important part of the job.
     
  23. macsrus macrumors 6502

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  24. Justapas macrumors newbie

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    #24
    I'm not trying to start a fight here. I just stumbled across this post during a google search and couldn't not respond. First I really don't think a blanket statement about who is best can be made. Certainly all professions have bright shining stars. If the "best" was issued due to salary, generally PA's make more than NP's at least that is the case in California. And as far as asking a question, if you want a nursing diagnosis, ask a nurse, if you want a medical diagnosis ask a Dr or a PA. its the difference between obesity and "an alterd level of nutrition" one is direct and to the point, the other is a search to say the same thing.
    Have a nice day.
     
  25. wdlove thread starter macrumors P6

    wdlove

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    #25
    NP's work under the direction of a physician just like an PA's. NP's generally have more education, they recieve a BSN and then go on to obain a MSN to become and NP. It is specialization nursing. They can diagnose just like a physician. Using the the same diagnostic tools and term. In some states like Massachusetts they can also prescribe medications. NP's do go father in diagnosing a patient than a physician or NP. The NP looks at the whole person the mental, social, & physical.
     

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