in the review process, do they look at the code?

Discussion in 'iOS Programming' started by alexandergre, Dec 13, 2009.

  1. macrumors member

    alexandergre

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    Jul 28, 2009
  2. macrumors 6502a

    Mars478

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    Mar 6, 2008
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    NYC, NY
  3. thread starter macrumors member

    alexandergre

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2009
    #3
    are you sure?

    Im developing an app now which has 6pages of code for the next update.
    those 6 pages are not needed for the current version.

    Will they accept my app?
     
  4. macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2007
    #4
    No they don't. You don't send them the code, only the precompiled binary. They do use static analysis to look at which methods you call, but that's not hte same thing.

    Amorya
     
  5. macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2009
    #5
    I am pretty sure they examine the code because otherwise why would they ask if your code is encrypted when you submit the app
     
  6. macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2007
    #6
    They don't ask that.

    The question about encryption is regarding US law for exporting software with certain encryption mechanisms in. Nothing to do with the code of your app.
     
  7. macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2009
    Location:
    Vancouver, BC
    #7
    They don't.

    They do run tests on your compiled app to make sure it's not doing anything sinister, has excessive memory leaks, using undocumented api's etc.
     
  8. macrumors 6502

    kAoTiX

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2008
    Location:
    Midlands, UK
    #8
    +1 for no
    They cannot decompile your compiled app that you send to them and in no part do they ask for the code. Unless they asked for the code they can only do as others have said and check for the apps functions and calls to their API's and to check for memory leaks etc.
     
  9. macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2003
    Location:
    Silicon Valley
    #9
    An app built using their SDK toolchain exposes all Objective C class names and messages, in plain text in the binary, for not only any iPhone UI and Foundation class use, but also for any classes and methods internal to your app.

    And, not only Apple, but the cracking community is reported to have tools that allow them to disassemble compiled apps sufficiently enough to find and patch out anti-piracy code.
     
  10. Moderator

    dejo

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2004
    Location:
    The Centennial State
    #10
    Agreed. You don't send them the source code, so they can't look at it.

    But, like firewood said, they can decompile your code if they choose to. Not normally necessary though.
     

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