Inside a Genetics Lab (it has iMacs)

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by billy_d_goat, Dec 14, 2006.

  1. billy_d_goat macrumors member

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    Mar 23, 2005
    #1
    Random tidbit: here is a link to a tour of a genetics lab. I think the mouse guillotine impressed (or scared) me the most! It's got a couple of old and new iMacs too :D

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Fleetwood Mac macrumors 65816

    Fleetwood Mac

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    #2
    A lovely tour. Is it of your own compisition? If so, what software was used?
     
  3. billy_d_goat thread starter macrumors member

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    Mar 23, 2005
    #3
    Hi iDuck (is that an new apple product perhaps?) :p

    Actually, it was built by the fine lady scientists seen in the tour using the virtual tour Web app on Mapwing.com. You can sign up for a free account and create your own... Here's a link: http://www.mapwing.com/create.php
     
  4. Fleetwood Mac macrumors 65816

    Fleetwood Mac

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    #4
    That site looks very interesting. I'll have to try and make a tour of something myself, thanks.
     
  5. billy_d_goat thread starter macrumors member

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    #5
    Thanks guys. Some of the other tours in the mapwing gallery are interesting too...like this one built from screenshots in WoW. Kinda reminds me of Myst.

    [​IMG]

    The thing that impressed me about the lab tour besides the mouse guillotine (did anyone catch that?!) was the fact that they had iMacs. It claims to be hooked up to a microscope. I didn't realize that iMacs would be used in a heavy science situation like that. It is good to see things are changing...:)
     
  6. mcarnes macrumors 68000

    mcarnes

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  7. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

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    Grand Rapids, MI, USA
    #7
    Nice tour! :) So are you a part of this research group as well? DA stuff is interesting ... I'm really interested in how the monoamines come together functionally in the ACC. Although I'm not sure how well developed or representative the ACC of a mouse is.... (it's just not my line of work).
     
  8. billy_d_goat thread starter macrumors member

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    Mar 23, 2005
    #8
    mkrishnan, I'm actually not part of the group. I met Jess, the maker of the tour, over on Mapwing. She is wicked smart with genetics and the like. If you've got a question for her, I'm sure she'd respond.
     
  9. WildCowboy Administrator/Editor

    WildCowboy

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    Jan 20, 2005
    #9
    Macs have always been heavily used in science. My lab has 15 of them, mostly iMacs. We only have three PCs, two of which are used to run equipment for which the software only exists in PC form (one Windows, one OS/2).

    We use a lot of computational programs in our work, and in the past we relied heavily on Silicon Graphics workstations for our work (in addition to the Macs we've always had on our desks). But now that so many of our Unix-based programs can be used on OS X, usage of our SGI machines has dropped tremendously.
     
  10. billy_d_goat thread starter macrumors member

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    #10
    WildCowboy,

    That's cool. I guess I was aware that Unix programs were making people make the jump to the Mac for science/math purposes. I just didn't realize that the hardware support was there for things like microscopes and the like.

    I guess that mean that companies that sell equipment like that are making Mac drivers? If so, do you know if this is something that has happened since Mac OS X or was it going on back in the dark ages too (classic *shudder*). ;)
     
  11. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

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    Grand Rapids, MI, USA
    #11
    In my past experience, you don't typically get an install disc with drivers when you buy this kind of equipment, although that's sometimes an option. Rather, what tends to happen is that systems are packaged with the analysis computer. And because a lot of this hardware is made by PhD's who left the academic environment, and were Mac fans there, they make their stuff on MacOS when they start selling scientific software.... either that, or it's driven by a Matlab interface or something like that, in which case, if that host app is available on Macs, it pretty much works without farther fussing....
     
  12. billy_d_goat thread starter macrumors member

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  13. furcalchick macrumors 68020

    furcalchick

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    Dec 19, 2006
    Location:
    South Florida
    #13
    we used dells...

    most of the computers the fauclity used in their labs (which wasn't much, i went to a smaller college and we didn't use computers for lab work) were dells. in fact, most of the schools computers were dells (thats another story). but to see that computers are much a fact in most bigger time labs amazes me at how intergrated at techology we have become in science, and how more than ever we need people that are proficent in windows and macs.

    it was a great tour, got me to peek in a first class lab, instead of the mostly cramped and (sorry) second rate ones we had.
     

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