Install Linux on my Intel Mac

Discussion in 'Windows, Linux & Others on the Mac' started by thomasmallen, Feb 11, 2007.

  1. thomasmallen macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2007
    #1
    I have an intel Mac (2.0GHz Macbook) and want to install Linux as a sort of test run. If I like it, I'll take the necessary steps to remove OSX (no knock on Apple. I've been using Macs forever, from OS7 up to today). My main motivations are the potential to customize easily, and the fact that the majority of Linux OSs come free of charge. Frankly, I'll be damned if I pay Apple $130 every time I want the latest OS -- I can spend that money far better in other places.

    Also, I don't want to use Ubuntu. I understand it's great for starters, etc. But from what I understand some of its features are proprietary and aren't open source.

    So, how do I do this? What are my options? I'm a web designer/developer who does everything from graphics to compiling scripts to FTP'ing my junk. I would be concerned about not having my full version of Macromedia Suite 8, but I can always keep OSX around for this and others like Photoshop, etc. GIMP is supposed to be pretty nifty too, from what I've heard.

    Ideally, I would download the necessary files and either boot directly, if that's possible, or burn it all to a CD/DVD and boot from that. I really don't want to pay, but if I have to pay a one-time $30 for the base distribution, it won't kill me.

    I'm very excited to do this; please help me out! Maybe I can provide some web design tips (or Html, or Css, etc) to someone who really gives a hand...who knows?

    - Happy Mac User who would rather save his money
     
  2. sycho macrumors 6502a

    sycho

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2006
    #3
    install bootcamp, that will ensure the proper fireware on your macbook, then just install which ever flavor you want and just wipe out the HDD with it. I tired out ubuntu on my Core 2 Duo MacBook Pro and I could not get the wireless or sound working, but people have reported complete success with the Core Duo MacBooks.
     
  3. thomasmallen thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2007
    #4
    I've never used Boot Camp before...and Apple gears it towards the XP user. Can I simply download whatever type of Linux suits me, and they'll all work? This would be great. Any recommendations besides Ubuntu?
     
  4. Mernak macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2006
    Location:
    Kirkland, WA
    #5
    Fedora should work pretty well with the new intel laptops, just partition the drive using boot camp and put the dvd (or cds) in. I haven't had the greatest luck with booting linux cds on my macbook, it loads, restarts, then boots OS X, but fedora *should* let you boot fine
     
  5. 7on macrumors 601

    7on

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2003
    Location:
    Dress Rosa
  6. marcosscriven macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2006
    #7
    What part of Ubuntu is proprietary??

    Also, I concur with othes on here - Parallels is fantastic for installing things like Linux. I installed Ubuntu in litterally 5 or 10 minutes - and it runs like a dream.
     
  7. risc macrumors 68030

    risc

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2004
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    #8
    Linux ... bah ... install NetBSD! Or I guess you could just use a ports system on OS X and get all of the open source apps you need, but then hey who wants to pay Apple for OS updates ... I really hate how they force you to buy every new version that comes out. :rolleyes:
     
  8. Nitromaster macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2007
    Location:
    Ireland.
    #9
    I mostly use debian based linux distros.
    Mandriva is pretty good, theres a free version available (without dvd playback,mp3s etc)

    if you need help setting up your sytem try
    wiki.onmac.net
     
  9. HugMnster macrumors member

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2006
    Location:
    Tyler, Tx
    #10
    I second that vote for openSusE. Not used it on apple machines yet but been using it on pc hardware for years now. I plan to try an install onmy new imac 17 in month or so when I run out of projects at work.


    jack
     
  10. ChrisA macrumors G4

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2006
    Location:
    Redondo Beach, California
    #11
    No. Look at VMware. VMware will run under Linux, Mac OSX and Windows. Parallels is Mac OSX only. If you use computers that are not Mac OSX based then VMWare allows you to run the same software on all the machines and move the VMs around between them

    If you are looking to convert over to Free Software then you don't want either ogf these. Google "QEMU" it is a free open source VM system that can do a few things the comercial guys can't
     
  11. ChrisA macrumors G4

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2006
    Location:
    Redondo Beach, California
    #12
    Nothing wrong with Linux. I'm typing this on a Linux system. I use it at leat 9 hours a day here in the office. At home my file server is Linux. But you have to decide what you want to DO with your computer. Do you want to just run an OS -- that's pointless. The computer is only as usfull as the software you run on it. So chose the application software FIRST then buy the machine and the OS that runs it best.

    If you like to edit video and you prefer Final Cut or if you like Apple's "Aperture" or Adobe Photoshop then Linux is just not going to work for you. On the other hand, I'm doing a kind of software development that is best done under Linux. I use both.

    Which Linux to get? Again, what do you want to do? These suggestions to "use Fedora", Use SUSE or whatever don't mean much unless they take into consideration what you want to use the computer for. For example if you want to run Cinelerra, (http://heroinewarrior.com) you need a version of Linus that can run it.

    One more question -- Why Linux? Why not Solaris or BSD? Even if you do go with Linux it would be good to know why you selected it over the others. Solaris has a lot going for it.
     
  12. Nitromaster macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2007
    Location:
    Ireland.
    #13
    Gimp is quite good.
    You should try it on your mac.
    Theres a version called gimpshop which is changed to be more photoshop-liks.
     
  13. elppa macrumors 68040

    elppa

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2003
    #14
    Enjoy the experience, but I give it 6 months before you are back on the Mac. If you need things like Photoshop and the Macromedia Suite 8 for your daily work then it won't be much use. In my opinion GIMP comes no where near the latest beta of Photoshop for ease of use (sorry open source fans).
     
  14. Bill Gates macrumors 68020

    Bill Gates

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2006
    Location:
    127.0.0.1
    #15
    Gentoo and Debian are my favorite distributions, in that order. If my mac could simply boot linux from usb I'd run Gentoo alongside OS X.
     

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