Institutionalised Corruption

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by skunk, Feb 27, 2006.

  1. skunk macrumors G4

    skunk

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2002
    Location:
    Republic of Ukistan
    #1
    http://nytimes.com/2006/02/27/inter...&en=8930bc6384bc57a9&ei=5094&partner=homepage

    Seems like a remarkably cosy arrangement.
     
  2. Thanatoast macrumors 6502a

    Thanatoast

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2002
    Location:
    Denver
    #2
    Why doesn't the Army do this stuff itself anymore? I don't see how subcontracting out to private companies is saving any money at all, so it can't be that. Is it more efficient to have the specialization of private contractors take over from an Army forced to do everything?

    How did it workin WWII? Did the Army do *everything*? From feeding itself to transporting it's own supplies to building it's own bridges? What happened?
     
  3. tristan macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2003
    Location:
    high-rise in beautiful bethesda
    #3
    It's because people won't work for Army salaries. Since the army is too cheap to pay an engineer $85k, they have to pay a defense contractor $280k for the same engineer. Government IT works the same way - they pay a contracting company $150/hr or $280k/yr for an Oracle DBA because they're too cheap to hire one directly for $110k a year. Of course the DBA still makes only $110k and the contracting company keeps the rest.
     
  4. skunk thread starter macrumors G4

    skunk

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2002
    Location:
    Republic of Ukistan
    #4
    It's a simple way to do business with none of the usual constraints: nothing comes under proper scrutiny when there's a war on.
     
  5. Desertrat macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2003
    Location:
    Terlingua, Texas
    #5
    The military is stuck with a particular pay-scale for its own people. In WW II, expertise could be--and was--drafted. Even after the end of the Draft, there was enough manpower to do a lot of the now-contracted jobs. Down-sizing of the military obviated that option.

    Think back no farther than Desert Shield. Troops and equipment went to Saudi Arabia via contract freighters, passenger ships and civilian airliners. If I were a guessing sort of guy, I'd figure the costs were about double...

    'Rat
     
  6. solvs macrumors 603

    solvs

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2002
    Location:
    LaLaLand, CA
    #6
    Wasn't Halliburton already fined for overcharging us? And they're doing it again? Guess they figure even if they're caught they'll just pay a little fine and go back to screwing us over. No-bid contract? No one else can do these jobs? Doesn't that bother anyone else?
     

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