international phonetic alphabet font?

Discussion in 'General Mac Discussion' started by puckhead193, Mar 14, 2005.

  1. puckhead193 macrumors G3

    puckhead193

    Joined:
    May 25, 2004
    Location:
    NY
    #1
    Anyone know where i can find a font or how to use the symbols in a MS word document. I need to make a chart for my voice and articulation class. I tryed the edit ->special character thing but only some where there...
    Thanks
     
  2. bigsteve3 macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2002
    Location:
    IL
    #2
    Hello,

    I too have searched for an IPA font to type materials for diction classes. I believe the one that ended up working for me was from:

    http://www.chass.utoronto.ca/~rogers/fonts.html

    I can't remember if I used Truetype or Postscript versions, as I'm away from my computer right now. All you would need to do is download the file, decompress it, and put it into ~/Library/Fonts (your user account folder is the ~).

    If you need more help, just let me know.

    -S
     
  3. puckhead193 thread starter macrumors G3

    puckhead193

    Joined:
    May 25, 2004
    Location:
    NY
    #3
    Whats the difference between truetype and postscript. After i movie it into my font folder would MS word regonzie it so i can make a chart :confused:
    Thanks
     
  4. MisterMe macrumors G4

    MisterMe

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2002
    Location:
    USA
    #4
    Microsoft Word, like every other Mac application, will automatically recognize your font if it is placed in any of three Fonts folders: the Fonts folder in your Classic System Folder, /Macintosh HD/System Folder/Fonts/, your MacOS X global Fonts folder, /Macintosh HD/Library/Fonts/, or the Fonts folder in your home directory, ~/Library/Fonts/. You can install the font by doubling-clicking on it and launching Font Book. You can also simply drag the font file to your desired Fonts folder. Just because you are using MS Word doesn't mean that you have to do anything special for it to recognize your fonts.
     
  5. stoid macrumors 601

    stoid

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2002
    Location:
    So long, and thanks for all the fish!
    #5
    IIRC, PostScript fonts use vector-based beziers to define their edges and are therefore resolution independant, but more susceptible to render errors and marginally more processor intensive. TrueType fonts are bitmapped and therefore may not scale well to extremely large sizes. However, the difference is pretty negligible on modern computers, so I wouldn't worry about it, as Mac OS X can handle both types, and even some fonts that are labelled as 'Windows' fonts.
     
  6. puckhead193 thread starter macrumors G3

    puckhead193

    Joined:
    May 25, 2004
    Location:
    NY
    #6
    When i double click it font book opens but does not display a preview or anything, nuthing comes up, the only that happenes is font book opens but doesn't display anything it just opens and u can see it in task bar on the top I tryed moving it to the the font folder in my home directory and nuthing happens.:confused:

    I think i'm "special" :eek:
     
  7. MisterMe macrumors G4

    MisterMe

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2002
    Location:
    USA
    #7
    Wrong. TrueType fonts are not bitmapped. TrueType fonts are standalone outline fonts. OTOH, PostScript fonts often require at least a companion bitmapped font or TrueType font to be recognized by the OS.

    TrueType: This is an outline font format developed by Apple Computer. TrueType outlines are quadratic splines. For a given number of control points, quadratic splines are rendered faster than the cubic splines used in PostScript fonts. OTOH, quadratic splines require more control points to render a character of equal quality to PostScript. Each TrueType character is an object holding the control points which establish the character's outline as well as the executable code which the renderer uses to draw the character.

    PostScript Type 1: This is an outline font format developed by Adobe. Adobe also developed the largely defunct Type 3 format. Type 3 lost out to Type 1 because it could not be hinted. At any rate, PostScript fonts are pure data with no embedded intelligence. Each character is defined by a set of points which defines the cubic spline required to draw the character's outline.
     
  8. puckhead193 thread starter macrumors G3

    puckhead193

    Joined:
    May 25, 2004
    Location:
    NY
    #8
    Anyone with a suggestion on why it its not working? :confused:
     

Share This Page