iPod undermines Microsoft on copy-locked CDs

Discussion in 'MacBytes.com News Discussion' started by MacBytes, Jul 12, 2004.

  1. macrumors bot

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    #1
  2. macrumors regular

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    Dec 29, 2003
    #2
    Another "cnet" article....this is great....

    This is my favorite paragraph:

    "That "second session" has been filled, to date, with songs in Microsoft's Windows Media Audio format. Both companies chose the WMA format because it's supported by virtually every PC on the market, and a large number of different portable players."

    Yes. This PROPRIETARY format is supported by virtually every pc. AAC is supported by EVERY pc (Mac/Ibm). AAC is also supported by the #1 portable player on the planet. Are these "journalists" so blind? They got bit in the ass by m$ recently because most everyone in the world "clung" to their crappy IE browser. Are they going to do it again? Should WMA become the next "standard", how long will it take for someone to create a virus to erase the contents of a WMA player? That will be funny.

    Why can't people see that this "popular" format which gives people "choice" is another m$ push for dominace that in reality gives no one a real choice - "they all must use m$."

    iPod rocks...and will continue. Nuff said.
     
  3. macrumors regular

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    #3
    It's not mentioned but they mean audio formats with DRM. WMA is supported by almost all PCs and anyone can make WMA files with DRM attached. Only Apple can make DRMed AAC files and only the iPod can play them. In that respect AAC is less accessible.
     
  4. macrumors 6502

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    #4
    My thoughts on the whole format thing. In the long run, MP3 will win, because there are no holdbacks, everything can play it, and it is good quality. Myself I use either 320 AAC, 320 MP3, and Lossless, because I like quality. But most don't care. Mp3 will win.

    Wow that paragraph had no cohearence to it at all. But I also have to say how I hate to listen to WMA songs. They just sound soo bad....
     
  5. macrumors regular

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    #5
    MP3 will win for consumer ripping, yes. But there is no DRM to MP3 so record companies won't support it. It's the DRM that causes incompatibilities. Someone needs to have a DRM standard. If apple opened Fairplay then maybe AAC would take over. I'd much rather see AAC become standard than WMA.

    What about OGG? Can it be wrapped in DRM?
     
  6. macrumors 6502

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    #6
    OGG with DRM? It's probably possible, but I can't imagine anyone bothering. The encoders and decoders are all open source, so circumvention would be trivial.

    I agree that DRM-free formats will win out. MP3 still has the largest mindshare of the public, being even more closely associated with music than Google is with searching.

    Myself, I encode most of my music in OGG. My ears pick up a lot of distortion in MP3s when the music is complex (lots of layered instruments and rhythms), but OGG at 256 bps sounds flawless. I've been able to download nearly all the music I want in OGG at allofmp3.com.
     
  7. macrumors regular

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    #7
    Open source doesn't mean it can be circumvented. Encryption methods are pubicly known but it doesn't meant you can decrypt it. A good system will be safe and secure even if it's open source. That's one of the "features" of open source.
     
  8. macrumors 68040

    shamino

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    #8
    Well, there's no industry standard DRM definition for MP3. There's no reason why someone couldn't invent one. But why bother when there are other standards that sound much better?
    You can wrap anything in DRM. The big question is whether there is any point to it.

    Once you slap DRM on the file, it can no longer be played by third-party open-source players. Whatever you use will have to understand the DRM, and will need to have proprietary decryption keys to do it. This sort of undermines the entire point of ogg-vorbis. You might as well just use something with an established DRM legacy, like AAC or WMA.
     
  9. Moderator

    Nermal

    Staff Member

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    #9
    I own one "copy controlled" "CD". It rips in iTunes for Mac with no problems whatsoever. On Windows, as soon as it's inserted, it says that system files need to be updated to play the disc. I clicked Cancel, loaded up iTunes, and again ripped it successfully. :rolleyes:
     
  10. macrumors regular

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    #10
    There's no such thing as copy protected CDs. I've never seen a CD I couldn't rip or copy. It just protects against complete computer novices, and if they can't rip it they'll just download it.
     
  11. macrumors 68020

    winmacguy

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    #11
    Articles like this just make me laugh. I am glad that Apple has "undermind" Microsoft with the success of the iPod.
    Of course Microsoft is the standard that the rest of the world follows.... NOT!!!!
    Think different eh...hehehehehe
     
  12. macrumors 68040

    shamino

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    #12
    Now that most CD-rippers include code for error correction, anything that can be played can be ripped.

    If they create two sessions (one audio, one data), you just need to make sure your software reads the audio session and ignores the data session. This is pretty easy on MacOS, and isn't all that difficult on Windows either.
     
  13. macrumors 68040

    shamino

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    #13
    Amusing spelling error in this context. Apple has undermined the Microsoft under-mind. :D
     

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