Is it possible to get true and even colors with an Apple LCD?

Discussion in 'Mac Help/Tips' started by teabgs, May 26, 2002.

  1. teabgs macrumors 68030

    teabgs

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2002
    Location:
    behind you
    #1
    or do I really need to buy a CRT for this?

    I need to do video and animation work on my machine and so true colors matter. I also, move a lot (student) so I want a light weight monitor with lots of viewing area if possible. Please let me know.


    Thanks
     
  2. Rower_CPU Moderator emeritus

    Rower_CPU

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2001
    Location:
    San Diego, CA
    #2
    You're going to get a mixed response on this.

    Personally, I am an LCD fan. For true-color work though, they aren't comparable with CRTs...yet.

    Samsung, the manufacturer of Apple's LCDs, just announced some new technology it will be using in its next displays. I would wait 'til then if I were you.

    Here's the thread: http://www.macrumors.com/forums/showthread.php3?threadid=5353&highlight=Samsung
     
  3. MacAztec macrumors 68040

    MacAztec

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2001
    Location:
    San Luis Obispo, CA
    #3
    Yea...

    Those foldable LCDs should be pretty friggin awesome!
     
  4. teabgs thread starter macrumors 68030

    teabgs

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2002
    Location:
    behind you
    #4
    Re: Yea...


    yes they should....BUT with the CURRENT LCD's is it possible....?

    Also in response to Rower... Do you think I should get a cheap (as in used from a friend) CRT and use that and maybe wait a while til I can get a better LCD? I really dont want to take up a lot of space. I'm in a point in my life where I am trying to minimize space use and possesions....

    I know I should prolly go with a trinitron, but I like the LCD's so much more...
     
  5. Rower_CPU Moderator emeritus

    Rower_CPU

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2001
    Location:
    San Diego, CA
    #5
    teabgs-

    That would probably be a good option. LCD prices are only now starting to stabilize, since production is catching back up with demand. Prices should drop over the next year or so.

    Another thing to keep in mind is that Apple's current low-end LCDs (15, 17) are based on VERY old LCD technology. I would definitely wait for them to refresh those displays, and a probable price drop, before buying from Apple.
     
  6. teabgs thread starter macrumors 68030

    teabgs

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2002
    Location:
    behind you
    #6
    I saw an add from Sharp (I think) in June 2002 MacAddict for an LCD that has a higher resolution/more colors then Apple's HD display, I'm gonna look into it more, but I guess I'llprobably have to go with the huge, heavy, ugly monitor...:mad:
     
  7. Rower_CPU Moderator emeritus

    Rower_CPU

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2001
    Location:
    San Diego, CA
    #7
    Unfortunately with LCD purchases, it's a $ issue right now.

    I'm really looking foward to price cuts in the future that will bring LCDs down to price parity with CRTs. By then they should have comparable performance as well, so bye-bye heavy, ugly monitors! :)
     
  8. Falleron macrumors 68000

    Falleron

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2001
    Location:
    UK
    #8
    I have a 17" Apple LCD. I would not change it for anything! Ok, it was expensive but I reckon it was worth it! I have no problems with colours (not a graphics person though). For me it is great.
     
  9. Classic macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2001
    #9
    For video and animation....

    Depending on your final viewing medium, you might find that neither a CRT or LCD is really what you want.

    If you're editing video for the purpose of viewing it on a TV, you need an external NTSC monitor. They aren't particularly cheap. But you can calibrate your color accordingly, and you will have true NTSC rectangular pixels, rather than the square pixels you see on both CRT and LCD monitors.

    Just something to consider along with all the other stuff.
     
  10. AlphaTech macrumors 601

    AlphaTech

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2001
    Location:
    Natick, MA
    #10
    The ViewSonic LCD that I have (VG175) came with color calibration software and a color chip to use in the process. I don't know if I did mine right, since I am color blind :D. You could pick up color calibration hardware that will put all your devices in sync for color (includes your scanner and printer). I know that Monaco Systems offers such a product, and I think it has gotten good reviews (don't remember hearing bad stuff about it).

    There are other advantages to LCD's that should be considered before you decide. One is eye strain. If you intend on sitting in front of the screen for more then a few hours at a time, that should be in your decision process. LCD's have virtually zero eye strain. This means that you can look at them for 12 hours and not have your vision fade on you. I used an LCD (at work) for over a year and could look at it a lot longer then a CRT display without getting tired. That was a major factor when I decided to get a new screen for home. The brightness and contrast of current LCD's are amazing. I know that ViewSonic has units that are truely stunning to look at. Screen refresh/flicker is also something to consider. With CRT's you will always have some, even if you cannot consciously see it, it's there. With the current batch of LCD's (and those from about a year or two ago) that is also not there.

    Usuable screen size is something else to consider. With CRT's, you never get the advertised screen size... a 21" screen is really 20" (if you are lucky). With a 18.1" LCD, that is the actual screen size. Also, the resolution of the LCD gives you more usable space. I set my 17.4" LCD to 1280x1024 and have the same amount of usuable space as a 21" CRT.

    Oh yeah, some other things that you might want to consider about the screens. CRT's produce both heat, and suck up lots of power. LCD's produce virtually no heat, and use a fraction of the power of CRT's. CRT's also emit radiation (not all that much, but that is all part of CRT technology), where LCD's do not.

    Personally, I would suggest getting a LCD screen and calibrate it to your devices. I firmly believe that you will be happier in the long run if you get it now instead of later. Also, what would you do with the used, used CRT when/if you get a LCD later??? Don't expect to get what you are giving your friend for it, unless he is giving it to you for a song.
     
  11. teabgs thread starter macrumors 68030

    teabgs

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2002
    Location:
    behind you
    #11
    Very good points. thanks. I have a few follow ups:

    1)About how much is an NTSC monitor? I think I had looked at prices before and they were kinda pricey.

    2)is the color calibration a complicated process?

    3)Do you need to keep calibrating the LCD to keep it correct?

    I'd be getting the monitor for $225. I took a look at it and it's pretty nice. BUt big and hefty as well. :( He got an iBook and got rid of his G3 tower so he has no more use for it.

    Maybe I should look into the LCD's a bit more. WHat are the best LCD brands. I know Samsung does apples...and I doubt I'll go with apples cause they're kinda expensive.
     
  12. AlphaTech macrumors 601

    AlphaTech

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2001
    Location:
    Natick, MA
    #12
    If I remember correct, MOST NTSC monitors are small... in the area of 15".

    The color calibration is easy, and it doesn't need to be done over unless you change something.

    I hope you don't pull something bad if you go with the friends monitor. Personally, I still think that LCD's are the way to go.

    For brands to look at... I favor ViewSonic... I have one, and tested them against what NEC and SGI offer. In those cases, the ViewSonic beat them all, hands down.
     
  13. Nipsy macrumors 65816

    Nipsy

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2002
    #13
    If true color is your aim:
    Make sure that your friend's CRT is able to support true hardware color correction (many do not) through the use of a wand. A vanilla CRT won't give you advantages over an LCD. You want to look at monitors like the LaCie Electron Blue.

    Some LCDs are now coming with correction options that get's them in the running with CRTs (I believe the ForMac is available in a Pro Bundle with a calibration wand). If you're working for video, make sure your LCD of choice has a high pixel refresh timing (not screen refresh rate). This will help prevent visual pixel latency problems.

    If you are really serious about color, you should prolly setup a three headed beast, where you work on an LCD (to prevent eye strain), pre-proof on a CRT, and proof your final edits on an NTSC (or PAL) studio monitor. This is far from the cheapest option, but yields the best results.

    If you looking for 'pro' results, without investing a small fortune, you can probably approximate through careful testing and adjustment, with whatever monitor you choose. Make sure that you write your final settings down for posterity, and back up whatever ColorSync profiles you create!
     

Share This Page