Is It Safe To Take A Shower In A Thunderstorm?

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by SamIchi, Jun 19, 2006.

  1. macrumors 68030


    Aug 1, 2004
    Cause I just did, and I just searched online and said it was a bad idea. It's a pretty bad storm too, it just started. That was one of the fastest showers I ever took :D , I needed it, I just got back from playing basketball, and I hate sitting around all sweaty.

    Should I also stop charging my MacBook?
  2. macrumors 68030


    Dec 21, 2004
    Are you in the D.C. area?? We're having a beast of a storm where I am right now--thunder, lightning, and pouring rain. I'm just waiting for the power to go out....
  3. Guest


    May 26, 2004
    Randy's House
    I knew there was a reason it was getting dark...:D
  4. Administrator/Editor


    Staff Member

    Jan 20, 2005
    Yes, you can be electrocuted in the shower or while on the phone if a lightning bolt strikes your house. The chances of it happening are awfully slim, but better safe than sorry.

    And yes, best to unplug crucial electronic equipment. Surge protectors should help prevent against such things, but again, don't chance it if you can help it.

    Edit: iGary, I look forward to hearing about today's adventures with the talking car...
  5. thread starter macrumors 68030


    Aug 1, 2004
    I'm in Albany NY. I think it might be clearing up already, but you never know with these storms.

    I don't think I have a surge protector, but i got one of those bricks, I don't think it protects anything though.
  6. Guest


    May 26, 2004
    Randy's House
    Ah yes - looks like a doozy....


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  7. macrumors 68040


    Your not safe in the shower, if it hits the house in the right spot you can get electrified water!
  8. macrumors 6502

    Nov 2, 2002
    Atlanta, Georgia
    It's definitely not a smart idea. Growing up, my Grandma would never let me take a bath if it was lightning. When she was younger, her cousin was killed by taking a shower during a storm due to the lightning. So, I'd warn against it.
  9. macrumors 68040


    Apr 24, 2003
    Heh, yeah bad idea. The Mythbusters episode about this was pretty fun to watch though.
  10. macrumors 6502a


    Jul 23, 2004
    40º27.8''N, 75º42.8''W
    It's perfectly safe! Pour some salt into the water and grip some ungrounded electric wires while juggling a running hair dryer. Don't slip! :D
  11. macrumors P6


    Jun 4, 2003
    Then get one. You've spent presumably several thousands of dollars on your electronic equipment (Mac, TV(s), stereo, receiver, DVD player, gaming machine, etc.) so spend the extra $$$ to protect them properly. Trust me, it's worth it. :cool:
  12. macrumors 6502

    Jul 29, 2004
    Not quite related but close enough. One morning I was showering and all of a sudden all the lights went out along with a huge "zzzzzzzzap" and then an orange glow filled the room. A power line had fallen right in front of my house and was arcing to, what I later found out, the gas main. It wasn't long before that burst into flames and I had to evacuate the house. It burned quite a nice hole in the ground by the time they could shut it off. It's probably good that it picked the gas main and not the water main.
  13. macrumors 65816


    Mar 12, 2006
    Under the sun
    Wow. Hearing about things like that makes the risk feel more real instead of just a "I know someone's sister who heard this story..." kind of thing
  14. macrumors 65816

    Jan 4, 2005
    Buy one that as an insurence policy on it. So if something does go wrong they buy you new stuff.

    I would like to note that a surge protect will not save your computer from a lighting strike. Even most high end ones that you buy. they run the likely hood of it is so small that we just pay those off.

    If lighting strikes the ground wire at your house pretty much everything pluged in is as good as fried. The surge protectors just are not built to take that ammount of power that quickly. It just over load them and take out the eletronics.
  15. macrumors 6502

    Nov 2, 2002
    Atlanta, Georgia
    Are you being sarcastic?
  16. macrumors 68000


    Jan 23, 2004
    San Francisco, Terre d'Ange, Bas Lag, Gallifrey
    I always feel like this question is part myth and part reality - growing up in rural NH, we were always told not to do anything with running water, to stay away from open windows, don't talk on the telephone, and unplug your fridge during a thunderstorm (gods know where this came from).

    In a rural setting like we were in, where power lines run above ground and you're surrounded by trees that could get hit by lightening or blow over during a bad storm, this all seemed to make sense (except for unplugging the fridge). While our house was never hit by lightening, the power transformer across the street got hit when I was in gradeschool. I was watching the storm out the window of our house (plate glass), and I remember seeing everything go white and hearing a *huge* explosion followed an instant later by a second *huge* explosion - I was so startled I fell off the chair I was sitting in. The power was out, two of our telephones were fried (phone lines ran above ground, too) to the point of smelling like cordite or something, and the telephone pole across the street was in flames with the transformer box completely blown apart and giving off visible electrical arcs. In retrospect, it was kind of cool, but I'd always wondered what would have happened if I was talking on the phone when the transformer was hit.

    But, in an urban setting like NYC, none of this made any sense - the electrical grid was mostly underground and completely distributed. All major communications lines were underground too. I took showers and talked on the phone all the time during thunderstorms big and small in NYC, and I couldn't even hear the usual static "pop" lightening creates on phone lines. More likely (and this happened to our block twice), was coming home and finding smoke pouring out of the manholes on the street with ConEd and NYFD running around trying to put out some sort of overheating or other type of electrical fire underground caused by poor insulation, old cables, heat, or construction mishap.

    Though I did see some really fantastic "once-in-a-lifetime" ball lightening growing up in NH, too. But a topic for a different thread...
  17. macrumors 604


    May 28, 2005
    Even though it wouldn't be a good idea to get yourself electrocuted...Lightning/electricity is inherintly lazy and looks for the easiest way to get from point A to point B. That means that if your body is all wet, lightning will just travel the outside...your hair'll all get singed, but your internal organs should be fine, assuming you only get shocked once. After that it becomes iffy..
  18. Moderator emeritus


    Oct 21, 2003
    Portland, OR
    Great quote! :)

    No wonder it's so fat and sitting on my damned couch all the time!
  19. macrumors 65816

    Jan 4, 2005

    only problem is that water is not going to last long enough to matter. it be vaporsize almost instatinly from the heat. that leave only your body to conduct it. Plus water it self is a very very poor conudutor of eletricity. Pure water can not conduct any at all. Now salt water or water full of ions can. And Guess what you body is full of them so it will conduct it really nicely. On top of that your entire never system is a good conductor of electricity. So you body has it own wireing systme to put though. Better than the water and like you said it goes for the easiest path and you nerver are better than water to conduct it (so is most of you body. It be just like having circuts in paralla not all the power going to go though it but some of the power will.

    And when you consider how much raw power is in lighting it only takes a small fraction of it to kill you.
  20. macrumors 68000


    Apr 28, 2005
    Redmond, WA
  21. macrumors Penryn


    Dec 27, 2002
    Location Location
    I think we just found the worst advice in this thread. Sorry, but true. :p
  22. Moderator emeritus

    Jun 25, 2002
    Gone but not forgotten.
    Living in Central Floriduh, the lightning capital of the world, I've learnt that surge supressors aren't always enough. My electric meter even has a special supressor on it.

    It used to be safe to be in a car, even if lightning struck but with all the man-made materials in tires, you're more likely to be shocked by a strike.

    Doing anything around plumbing is dangerous because of the water. Using a wired phone is worse because phone companies rarely have any surge supression on their lines.
  23. macrumors 68000


    Dec 21, 2005
    Yeah, but it was funny.
  24. Moderator emeritus


    May 1, 2005
    Yeah. :D They also showed that people using a desktop computer could be fried, too. :eek:
  25. macrumors 603


    Aug 20, 2005
    Thank you Jah...I'm so Blessed
    Better yet get a boombox(plug it in to the outlet) and shower with it...lets see what will happen..


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