Is it true that...

Discussion in 'Mac Pro' started by Grenadier, Jan 20, 2007.

  1. Grenadier macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2006
    #1
  2. MacNut macrumors Core

    MacNut

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    Jan 4, 2002
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    CT
    #2
    As long as the OS can recognize the size of it.
     
  3. Eraserhead macrumors G4

    Eraserhead

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    UK
  4. MacNut macrumors Core

    MacNut

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    Jan 4, 2002
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    CT
  5. Silentwave macrumors 68000

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    May 26, 2006
    Location:
    Gainesville, FL
    #5
    Won't work, the 15000RPM drives are all SCSI Ultra 320, 640, or SAS, not SATA.

    best you can do is a 10,000RPM for those, IIRC.
     
  6. Makosuke macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2001
    Location:
    The Cool Part of CA, USA
    #6
    As said, SCSI does not equal SATA, which is what the internal drives on the Mac Pro use. If you want a 10K RPM drive, you can get a Raptor, but that's it.

    Now, you can of course buy a SCSI card (I'm assuming there are some PCIe ones compatible with the Mac Pro out there), and then use whatever SCSI drive you feel like. If you're looking at 15K RPM drives for a computer that expensive, the added cost of the card shouldn't be a big deal.

    Frankly, though, most high-end SCSI drives are optimized for server use, which is significantly different from single user use, even at the highest end. For that reason, you won't necessarily get that much more speed (if ANY) from a 15K SCSI drive than from a Raptor (which is single-user tuned), or for that matter one of the new 750GB Seagates or the upcoming 1TB Hitachi.
     
  7. Grenadier thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2006
    #7
    Hmm-
    I see.

    Looks like Ill just stick with a Raptor then ;)
     

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