Is it worth adding an SSD?

Discussion in 'PowerPC Macs' started by zackkmac, Dec 3, 2012.

  1. macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2008
    Location:
    Tulsa
    #1
    Hi everyone.

    I have three PowerPC Macs. One is a 20" iMac G5 2.0GHz with 2GB RAM. I also have a 1.42GHz eMac with 2GB RAM, and a 400MHz iMac G3 with 1GB RAM.

    I love them and the 20" iMac is the kitchen computer, so it gets used almost daily. It currently has a 320GB hard drive in it. The eMac is a guest suite computer and has an 80GB hard drive. The iMac G3 is a kid's computer but not used very often..I think it has a 60GB or 80GB hard drive.

    Obviously the 20" would gain the most benefit since it is used the most. I am thinking of getting a 128GB SSD since nobody really stores anything on it anyways.

    What do you guys think? Would it be worth adding a small SSD to the other two? What kind of differences would I see in all 3 machines? I know adding an SSD has greatly improved my Intel Macs a lot but not sure about what it would do for PowerPC.

    Your help is greatly appreciated. :)
     
  2. macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2010
    Location:
    WI
    #2
    I don't know what the iMac G5 has for an HD interface, but if it is SATA, then yes, you will see a noticeable improvement. You'll have to be careful to get an SSD that works at SATA I speeds, since that's likely what your G5 is running. I have put SSD's in G5 PowerMacs, and it improves the performance significantly (~20% increase in benchmark scores for overall performance). You'll notice the increased speed on boot up, application launch, and web page loading.

    However, your other Macs are IDE/PATA, and are limited in the data transfer speeds, so the improvement won't be as noticeable. I've put an SSD in a Cube, and there is some improvement over a 7200 RPM IDE drive, but not a lot. Performance improvement alone would not be worth the cost, IMHO. However, in the Cube (or a PowerBook, for example) you will get a lower noise level (zero noise for an ssd), and lower power consumption, so that may be worth the upgrade.

    So, for improved performance alone, I think it is only worth putting an SSD in a Mac that can use SATA. Beyond that, it is personal choice.
     
  3. thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2008
    Location:
    Tulsa
    #3
    Sounds good. Thanks for the information. I will probably just upgrade the iMac G5 for now. It has a SATA II hard drive in it now, so my best bet will be to get a SATA II SSD. I've found a Crucial v4 and a 2.5 to 3.5 adapter for $85. Hopefully I would get that back out of it when I resell it sometime later. I think I only paid $150-$200 for the computer anyways.
     
  4. macrumors 6502a

    rjcalifornia

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2012
    Location:
    El Salvador
    #4


    Yes, a 100 times yes!!

    Not only for speed, but for better security. Normal HDD are prone to fail, SSD will last longer
     
  5. macrumors 6502a

    PowerPCMacMan

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2012
    Location:
    PowerPC land
    #5
    SSD's are really good in PPC macs.

    I thought SSD was only good for multiple reads and not multiple writes? After so many times of multiple writing to the drive, it eventually dies, no?

    Anyway, I just added an SSD to my PowerBook G4 1.67 DLSD and this thing flies, I mean.. flies.. Not bad for a PATA SSD. My next experiment is to buy an early Christmas gift, an SSD for my G5 Quad - That should be something.


     
  6. macrumors 6502a

    seveej

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2009
    Location:
    Helsinki, Finland
    #6
    Just out of curiosity: which SSD did you find, where and for how much?

    RGDS,
     
  7. macrumors 65816

    cocacolakid

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2010
    Location:
    Chicago
    #7
    SSD's will wear out faster than a traditional drive. The plus is the speed and no noise/very low heat. There is no traditional mechanical failure because there are no moving parts, but the memory will eventually 'wear out' for lack of a better term. Most SSD's are projected to be in the 7 year lifespan with normal, everyday use and projected read/write. However, most of us upgrade our computers (or need more storage space and upgrade the hard drive) long before 7 year intervals.
     
  8. macrumors 68000

    MisterKeeks

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2012
    #8
    Not entirely true. SSDs slow down, and if they fail, everything is gone forever. Though, I guess you could call that a form of security! ;)
     
  9. macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2006
    Location:
    Vancouver Island
    #9
    What you thought is true, it will eventually die, not all at once, and unless you are very-very young probably not in your lifetime.
     

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