Is my wireless router secure?

Discussion in 'Macintosh Computers' started by depakote, Mar 28, 2004.

  1. depakote macrumors member

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2003
    #1
    I just set up a wireless connection with my powerbook and a linksys router and want to find out if it is secure. I made my own SSID, disabled SSID broadcasting, set up the MAC filter, and am using 128 bit WEP protection. The thing that I am concerned about now is that Linksys and Default appear as network connections and I don't know how to delete them. When I use the Macstumbler software it detects them also. I cannot access these networks can anyone else? If they can I assume that they would be on a different network and unable to access my computer just use my bandwidth? Is there a way to delete them? Any feedback greatly appreciated!
     
  2. cjc343 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2004
    Location:
    In the apple store, in front of a G5.
    #2
    I have had problems with my Linksys card detecting networks that didn't exist.... I wouldn't be suprised if their routers broadcast networks that don't exist.

    Macstumbler/kismac/any wireless stumbling app is SUPPOSED to detect networks that are hidden. They do this by browing the possible channels for connections. When they stumble across a packet, it knows there is a network. It can tell from the packet what the Network name is....


    try turning off your router. Now search for networks.... are the "linksys" and "default" networks still there?
     
  3. Celeron macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2004
    #3
    If you've configured the router the way you say you did then there really isn't anything else you can do to make it secure. That's as good as it gets.

    As far as the other networks appearing, its possible that there are other people near you also running wireless networks. Again, if you've configured your router the way you say you have then no one should be able to access it without your knowing it.

    Another thing you can potentially do is limit the number of DHCP addresses you give out. If you only have 2 computers then there's no reason to allow 50 addresses.
     
  4. dudeami macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2004
    Location:
    Texas
    #4
    You may want to switch the encryption to WPA instead of WEP.
     
  5. grapes911 Moderator emeritus

    grapes911

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2003
    Location:
    Citizens Bank Park
    #5
    Secure, you are on over kill. I limited the number of addresses to the number of computers I have and then used the MAC filter to only allow my computers. I think that is all you need. WEP slows your connection down. If only your mac addresses can connect, why have a password. I live in a dorm and haven't have a problem yet.
     
  6. tomf87 macrumors 65816

    tomf87

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2003
    #6
    The performance hit WEP causes is very minimal so I wouldn't worry about that. Also, MAC addresses can be spoofed so that shouldn't be your only secure piont. Remember, multiple security points is better than one.

    And I'm glad you put "not yet" in your last statement, because nothing is impossible to secure down totally. Well, as long as a network connection and power exists... :)
     
  7. depakote thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2003
    #7
    I believe these networks are mine. How do I know what channel I am on? Macstumbler doesn't detect my protected network so I can't figure it out from there. If these are my networks how would I go about deleting them? Could someone use them? Thanks for the replies!
     
  8. depakote thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2003
    #8
    I turned off the router and those networks still appear so I know they aren't mine now. (Thanks for the tip cjc343, why didn't I think of that!) Does anyone know if it is possible to add WPA to a Linksys Wireless B router BEFW11S4? Thanks again!
     
  9. sparky76 macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2003
    #9
    Do remember that no wireless network is totally secure. With kismac, packets can be intercepted and the encryption broken. This would take the interception of at least 100MB (and more like 1GB) of packets, so if you work out how long it would take you to use that, and set an appropriate schedule to change your password, you should be secure.

    If you can detect other networks, they can detect (and potentially crack) yours.
     
  10. grapes911 Moderator emeritus

    grapes911

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2003
    Location:
    Citizens Bank Park
    #10
    Ok, so mac addresses can be spoofed and no network is secure. I agree. But lets look at this another way. Do you have anything worth stealling? I don't (and I'd guess most people don't either). People may try to connect to the net though your router. I check my log every week to so to see if i find anything unusual. If I do (and I haven't yet), I may make my network more secure. I just don't see a reason to make fort knox if you don't need it.
     
  11. tomf87 macrumors 65816

    tomf87

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2003
    #11
    Well, each person has their own secure mindset. Some people don't sleep with windows open because they are fearful of a break-in.

    Same here. Personally, I don't use WEP, and just use MAC filtering because I don't care that much about it. Others want to go all the way.
     

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