Is sixtyforce the best N64 emulator for Mac?

Discussion in 'Games' started by tomacintosh, Sep 25, 2005.

  1. tomacintosh macrumors regular

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  2. Patmian212 macrumors 68020

    Patmian212

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    #2
    Also where can I download roms(if this is ilegal feel free to delete this post)
     
  3. GFLPraxis macrumors 604

    GFLPraxis

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    #3

    ROMs are legal if and only if you rip them yourself, do not run them in two locations at once and do not share them with anyone.

    If you download them from a website, EVEN IF YOU OWN THE GAME, it is illegal.
    Except for homebrew and public domain roms. If that's what you want, then here are some legal roms for you.

    http://www.gameasylum.com/demoscene.html
     
  4. debroglie macrumors 6502a

    debroglie

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    #4
    Sixtyforce claims to be the best emulator for mac.... however it hasn't been updated in several years, which I think is BS because he requires you to donate money to him for "continuous development" if you want to run it fullscreen.
     
  5. jiv3turkey748 macrumors 6502a

    jiv3turkey748

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  6. jared_kipe macrumors 68030

    jared_kipe

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    #6
    Sixtyforce is a good emulator, but I donated money shortly after he updated for the last time. Not too happy about the lack of development, especially because some of the games he claims works (zelda anyone) doesn't work at all. But thats ok, cause I got the zelda games for gamecube now.
     
  7. jiv3turkey748 macrumors 6502a

    jiv3turkey748

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    #7
    zelda works fine for me
     
  8. tomacintosh thread starter macrumors regular

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    #8
    The first Zelda works for me, Ocarina of Time doesn't though
     
  9. jamdr macrumors 6502a

    jamdr

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    #9
    wait, what? I thought Ocarina of Time was the first Zelda (for N64). Majora's Mask doesn't work, but it was the second Zelda.

    But seriously, why bother with roms for N64? The games are so cheap now anyway...
     
  10. joechops macrumors newbie

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    Oct 10, 2004
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    Searcy, AR
    #10
    Ocarina of Time works fine for me in SixtyForce. Majora's mask does not. I too wish Gerritt would give SixtyForce an update or hand the project over to somebody else. N64 emulation on the PC is waaaaay ahead of N64 emulation on the Mac...
     
  11. tomacintosh thread starter macrumors regular

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    #11
    Sorry I meant Majora's Mask
     
  12. jaw04005 macrumors 601

    jaw04005

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    #12
    Who says? I would bet there is no specific law that forbids the use or downloading of game ROMs. The only law you *may* be violating is the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, and we all know how *clear* of a law that is. :rolleyes:

    Despite efforts by the music and film industry, it is still the copyright holder's responsibility (as of now) to enforce copyright law. Nintendo ROMs have been available for many years, if Nintendo had a real problem with it they would have served subpoenas to the emulator makers and ROM websites years ago.

    I would bet the folks at Nintendo don't see the ROM market as a threat, and besides the profit window for most ROMs (NES, SNES, N64, Virtual Boy, etc) has already passed. The ROM market assures that older games never die, and provides a sense of nostalgia to younger gamers.

    Nintendo's "blind-eye" to ROMs may change with the Revolution, but for now I wouldn't worry about getting sued because you downloaded Mario is Missing. ;) Just don't go downloading GBA, DS, or GCN games.
     
  13. anotherjeff macrumors regular

    anotherjeff

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    #13
    Nintendo does care about you downloading roms.
    just take a look at:
    Nintendo's website

    The law doesn't need to be specific. You are violating their copyright by downloading their roms, there doesn't need to be a specific anti-rom law and if this does impact their bottom line enough, there will be one. It's prolly just not worth the effort to really combat the rom market because it is so large and constantly shifting. It's a waste of resources.

    From the Nintendo website:
    What are Nintendo ROMS?

    A Nintendo ROM ("Read Only Memory") is the type of chip used in Nintendo's video game cartridge which contains the game software. However, this term is commonly used on many gaming sites on the Internet and refers to game data that was copied from an authentic Nintendo video game cartridge.

    What is a Nintendo Video Game Emulator?

    A Nintendo emulator is a software program that is designed to allow game play on a platform that it was not created for. A Nintendo emulator allows for Nintendo console based or arcade games to be played on unauthorized hardware. The video games are obtained by downloading illegally copied software, i.e. Nintendo ROMs, from Internet distributors. Nintendo ROMs then work with the Nintendo emulator to enable game play on unauthorized hardware such as a personal computer, a modified console, etc.

    Can I Download a Nintendo ROM from the Internet if I Already Own the Authentic Game?

    There is a good deal of misinformation on the Internet regarding the backup/archival copy exception. It is not a "second copy" rule and is often mistakenly cited for the proposition that if you have one lawful copy of a copyrighted work, you are entitled to have a second copy of the copyrighted work even if that second copy is an infringing copy. The backup/archival copy exception is a very narrow limitation relating to a copy being made by the rightful owner of an authentic game to ensure he or she has one in the event of damage or destruction of the authentic. Therefore, whether you have an authentic game or not, or whether you have possession of a Nintendo ROM for a limited amount of time, i.e. 24 hours, it is illegal to download and play a Nintendo ROM from the Internet.

    How Does Nintendo Feel About the Emergence of Video Game Emulators?

    The introduction of emulators created to play illegally copied Nintendo software represents the greatest threat to date to the intellectual property rights of video game developers. As is the case with any business or industry, when its products become available for free, the revenue stream supporting that industry is threatened. Such emulators have the potential to significantly damage a worldwide entertainment software industry which generates over $15 billion annually, and tens of thousands of jobs.

    What Does Nintendo Think of the Argument that Emulators are Actually Good for Nintendo Because it Promotes the Nintendo Brand to PC Users and Leads to More Sales?

    Distribution of an emulator developed to play illegally copied Nintendo software hurts Nintendo's goodwill, the millions of dollars invested in research & development and marketing by Nintendo and its licensees. Substantial damages are caused to Nintendo and its licensees. It is irrelevant whether or not someone profits from the distribution of an emulator. The emulator promotes the play of illegal ROMs , NOT authentic games. Thus, not only does it not lead to more sales, it has the opposite effect and purpose.

    How Come Nintendo Does Not Take Steps Towards Legitimizing Nintendo Emulators?

    Emulators developed to play illegally copied Nintendo software promote piracy. That's like asking why doesn't Nintendo legitimize piracy. It doesn't make any business sense. It's that simple and not open to debate.

    People Making Nintendo Emulators and Nintendo ROMs are Helping Publishers by Making Old Games Available that are No Longer Being Sold by the Copyright Owner. This Does Not Hurt Anyone and Allows Gamers to Play Old Favorites. What's the Problem?

    The problem is that it's illegal. Copyrights and trademarks of games are corporate assets. If these vintage titles are available far and wide, it undermines the value of this intellectual property and adversely affects the right owner. In addition, the assumption that the games involved are vintage or nostalgia games is incorrect. Nintendo is famous for bringing back to life its popular characters for its newer systems, for example, Mario and Donkey Kong have enjoyed their adventures on all Nintendo platforms, going from coin-op machines to our latest hardware platforms. As a copyright owner, and creator of such famous characters, only Nintendo has the right to benefit from such valuable assets.

    Isn't it Okay to Download Nintendo ROMs for Games that are No Longer Distributed in the Stores or Commercially Exploited? Aren't They Considered "Public Domain"?

    No, the current availability of a game in stores is irrelevant as to its copyright status. Copyrights do not enter the public domain just because they are no longer commercially exploited or widely available. Therefore, the copyrights of games are valid even if the games are not found on store shelves, and using, copying and/or distributing those games is a copyright infringement.

    Haven't the Copyrights for Old Games Expired?

    U.S. copyright laws state that copyrights owned by corporations are valid for 75 years from the date of first publication. Because video games have been around for less than three decades, the copyrights of all video games will not expire for many decades to come.

    Are Game Copying Devices Illegal?

    Yes. Game copiers enable users to illegally copy video game software onto floppy disks, writeable compact disks or the hard drive of a personal computer. They enable the user to make, play and distribute illegal copies of video game software which violates Nintendo's copyrights and trademarks. These devices also allow for the uploading and downloading of ROMs to and from the Internet. Based upon the functions of these devices, they are illegal.

    Can Websites and/or Internet Content Providers be Held Liable for Violation of Intellectual Property Rights if they are Only Providing Links to Illegal Software and/or Other Illegal Devices?

    Yes. Personal Websites and/or Internet Content Providers sites That link to Nintendo ROMs, Nintendo emulators and/or illegal copying devices can be held liable for copyright and trademark violations, regardless of whether the illegal software and/or devices are on their site or whether they are linking to the sites where the illegal items are found.

    How Do I Report Potential Infringements to Nintendo Products?

    To report infringing items on internet auction sites, please call us at 1-800-255-3700 or e-mail us at auctionpiracy@noa.nintendo.com

    To report ROM sites, emulators, Game Copiers, Counterfeit manufacturing, or other illegal activities, please call us at 1-800-255-3700 or e-mail us at piracyscene@noa.nintendo.com

    For any other legal inquiry or concern, please call us at 1-800-255-3700 or e-mail us at noalegal@noa.nintendo.com

    For more information on piracy issues regarding the videogame industry, please visit the Entertainment Software Association's website at www.theESA.com.
     
  14. Xeem macrumors 6502a

    Xeem

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    #14
    It doesn't matter. If you want to play an emulated game from a console that bit the dust long ago, I'd say go ahead. If game companies care enough to try to prevent people from downloading games that can no longer be found even on eBay, then they really need to shift their priorities.
     
  15. GFLPraxis macrumors 604

    GFLPraxis

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    #15
    Exactly.

    This right here is the interesting admission.

    Further research on the law reveals that it is legal to have the ROM on the following conditions:

    1) You rip it yourself off your own copy of the game.

    2) You do not distribute it to others.

    3) You do not run it in two locations at once.

    It's EXTREMELY strict.

    I've been planning to buy an Flash2Advance USB cable. It's not one of the "illegal game copying devices" mentioned by Nintendo- it's purpose is to transfer data to GBA Flash Carts, but it has the side capability of also being able to rip GBA games as well, allowing you to make your own legal backups.

    For NES, SNES and N64 games you'll need to take the games apart and use a lot of equipment to rip them.

    If you download them you are violating copyright laws.
     
  16. GFLPraxis macrumors 604

    GFLPraxis

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    #16
    They're not going to do anything. I don't think anyone has ever gotten in trouble over it. But it is still illegal, and falls under warez, and therefore should not be encouraged on Macrumors.
     
  17. applekid macrumors 68020

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    Jul 3, 2003
    #17
    Anyways, before we have a friggin' unnecessary fight about ROMs in this thread, I just want to say your choices for N64 emulators on the Mac are mupen and SixtyForce.

    Mupen just recently started getting updates on the Mac. It's mostly "unofficial" at the moment.

    SixtyForce is a little more preferable, IMHO, because it was built for the Mac from the ground up without any HLE (high level emulator) tricks.

    Give Gerrit Goosen a break. He's an aspiring actor. Too busy for Mac software development. (Though I found it odd how an actor became a developer for the Mac or vice versa)

    Just wait for those Intel Macs. I suspect superior emulators like PJ64 will be easier to port (albeit we'll need a workaround for the DirectX extensions).
     
  18. jiv3turkey748 macrumors 6502a

    jiv3turkey748

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    #18
    oh i havent tryed that one
     
  19. GFLPraxis macrumors 604

    GFLPraxis

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    #19

    I wonder if Cedega would work for Project64.
     
  20. alex_ant macrumors 68020

    alex_ant

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    #20
    You aren't violating the DMCA, you are violating copyright law. Game roms are software and software is protected under copyright law. Trust me, downloading roms is illegal.

    So we shouldn't worry about breaking the law because Nintendo is too small to know? It's OK apparently as long as the company can't stop us. Like the looting of the empty shops in New Orleans apparently.

    It frequently does shut down rom sites, but roms are also downloaded from p2p, not websites, which is much harder to stop.

    Irrelevant

    Irrelevant

    There is no blind eye. Microsoft, Sony, Sega, etc. all actively go after all sites that host illegal content to the extent of their power. This is why there are no "good" rom websites that stay around for long - they get taken down too quickly. The internet is just so big, and international, that it's impossible to get all infringing content taken down. This doesn't make copyright infringement right.
     
  21. DrNeroCF macrumors 6502

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    #21
    There's a release of Mupen .4 somewhere for the mac... works alright, mac 64 emulator support really is quite pathetic...
     
  22. Willeisen88, Oct 2, 2005
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2013

    Willeisen88 macrumors newbie

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    #22
    Mac's use OpenGL right...so shouldn't the OpenGL plug-in work for Macs(If it was ported)...

    I can program, but I am no good at working with source code...I wish someone would port this so I chould see if it would work... :confused:
     
  23. applekid macrumors 68020

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    #23
    The glN64 plug-in is the only OpenGL plug-in I know of that has been ported to the Mac (both used in Mupen and SixtyForce). With my experience with PJ64, glN64 was slow and not as compatible as Jabbo's DirectX plug-in. Maybe I configured it wrong or something, but whenever I used PJ64, I made sure to leave everything as is.
     
  24. WillMak macrumors 6502a

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    Jul 29, 2005
    #24
    is there a controller for the emulators? It's almost impossible to play some games with the keyboard since it's not force sensitive like an analog stick.
     
  25. jared_kipe macrumors 68030

    jared_kipe

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    #25
    I've used my xbox controller and works wonderfully. Anyway, first zelda always hangs during the opening where he gets his fairy.
     

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