Is string theory science or philosophy?

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by Gutwrench, Nov 23, 2012.

  1. macrumors 6502a

    Gutwrench

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2011
    #1
    I can't seem to create a poll, but was interested in your thought.

    1. Science, no further comment.

    2. Philosophy, no further comment.

    3. Probably science, immature theory but on the right track to yield scientific benefits.

    4. Not science, waste of time.

    5. Other
     
  2. macrumors 68030

    APlotdevice

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2011
    #2
    It is exactly what it's name suggests: a theory. That is to say a scientific theory, which itself is defined as "a well-substantiated explanation of some aspect of the natural world, based on a body of facts that have been repeatedly confirmed through observation and experiment."
     
  3. Moderator

    SandboxGeneral

    Staff Member

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    Detroit, Michigan
    #3
    Polls are added after you create the thread. Now just edit the post and the poll options will be available to you.
     
  4. thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Gutwrench

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2011
    #4
    Thank you. I think I deselected the poll option when creating the thread so it doesn't look available to me now. I appreciate the tip and will remember it.
     
  5. macrumors 68000

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    afk
    #5
    I'm no scientist, but hasn't it evolved to M-theory? Correct me if I'm wrong

    It's theoretical physics, with our current technology, it can't be proven in the strictest sense, but we can verify it by observing the results the theory implies. That being say anything in science can still be proven wrong if solid evidence is there, nothing is really set in stone.
     
  6. Moderator

    SandboxGeneral

    Staff Member

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    #6
    You can add it right now if you like. Press the edit button on your first post and scroll down to the poll section and add it.
     
  7. thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Gutwrench

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2011
    #7
    Not that I really think it's philosophy but how has it ever been tested and ever repeatedly confirmed through observation?
     
  8. thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Gutwrench

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    Jan 2, 2011
    #8
    I'm guessing you are correct.
     
  9. macrumors G3

    Huntn

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    #9
    Personally I believe it is the OPs responsibility to express some kind of an opinion or leaning when starting a thread like this. So what is it? :)
     
  10. thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Gutwrench

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2011
    #10
    I agree and sorry I haven't done so. I'm still coming to grips with it all. I'm far from any expert, but at this stage tend to agree with angelneo---I think it's a valid theory which is adding or at least helping to add to our knowledge.

    I posed the question because science requires testable and observable experiments and with our current knowledge we are unable to do that at the quantum level....particularly when dealing with the idea of strings or multidimensions. Exciting stuff though. From Newton to Einstein and Maxwell to this.
     
  11. Guest

    eric/

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    Sep 19, 2011
    Location:
    Ohio, United States
    #11
    I'd say its a mixture. It's science for obvious reasons, but I think it's philosophy because its simply a scientific way of describing life and the pursuit of that knowledge.
     
  12. macrumors 65816

    monokakata

    Joined:
    May 8, 2008
    Location:
    Hilo, Hawai'i
    #12
    When I was in graduate school, one of my professors liked to talk about "dubious dichotomies."

    "Science" versus "Philosophy" I think is one of those.

    But for an interesting discussion of how many physicists looked at quantum theory as either physics or philosophy, see this book:

    http://www.amazon.com/How-Hippies-S...sr=1-1&keywords=how+the+hippies+saved+physics

    It might sound like a woo-woo book, but the author is a historian of science, and he's writing about real people.
     

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