is the email from Apple <> legit or a scam?

Discussion in 'iPhone' started by davelanger, Oct 15, 2011.

  1. macrumors 6502a

    Mar 25, 2009
    Is this a phishing email or legit? I got this 5 minutes after getting my phone.
    The reason I ask is because they didnt give me a receipt during the process and had to ask for another one, and instead of looking for it, they just printed me a new one. I work for an internet company and know that we never ask for anyone to go to a website to plug in their UN and PW. So that is why I see red flags when viewing this email.

    Also if it is fraud, how did I get to so fast after getting my phone. Was it because I switched all my info to a new phone or are scams just this good now.

    You've entered xxxxxxx as the contact email address for your Apple ID. To complete the process, we just need to verify that this email address belongs to you. Simply click the link below and sign in using your Apple ID and password.

    it brings me to

    Verify Now >
    Wondering why you got this email?
    It's sent when someone adds or changes a contact email address for an Apple ID account. If you didn't do this, don't worry. Your email address cannot be used as a contact address for an Apple ID without your verification.
    For more information, see our frequently asked questions.
    Apple Customer Support
  2. macrumors 68030


    Jul 26, 2011
  3. macrumors 601


    Jul 14, 2010
    Phila, PA
    I highly doubt that you can change your email contact just by asking for a receipt. I would stay away.
  4. macrumors 6502a

    Mar 12, 2010
    Hilo, Hawaii
    That is the text of the authentic email address verification letter you get when you create an Apple ID. (for iTunes, iCloud, Game Center, etc.)

    ID.Apple.Com is the domain name of Apple's main Apple ID web site.

    I think that mail is legitimate -- but you're correct to be suspicious of things like this. There is a lot of fishing right now, especially around iPhone 4's and fake email from Apple, AT&T, Verizon, etc claiming you need to verify your information.
  5. macrumors regular

    Sep 26, 2011
    It's legit. Not a scam at all.

    You get this email when creating a new AppleID or adding an email address to your AppleID. Such as adding an email address as your iMessage or FaceTime caller ID.
  6. thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Mar 25, 2009
    OK thanks everyone. You would think Apple would just have you log into your itunes to verify your info, instead of an email link. Its always better to be safe than sorry. Since I never had facetime or imessage this must be why I got this email.
  7. macrumors newbie

    Nov 15, 2010
    In German

    Sorry. It's in Dutch
    I've just been emailed from,com. The text is in Dutch. As a UK citizen, I find this odd.
    This is the text

    Om het wachtwoord van je Apple ID opnieuw in te stellen, klik je op de onderstaande link. Vervolgens kom je op een webpagina waar je een nieuw wachtwoord kunt instellen.
    Deze link is slechts 3 uur geldig, gerekend vanaf het verzendtijdstip van deze e-mail.
    Wachtwoord Apple ID opnieuw instellen >

    Vragen? Je vindt het antwoord wellicht op onze Apple ID-ondersteuningspagina >
    Als je niet zelf hebt geprobeerd om je wachtwoord opnieuw in te stellen, hoef je je geen zorgen te maken: je account is nog steeds volkomen veilig en niemand heeft er toegang toe gehad. Hoogstwaarschijnlijk heeft iemand een
    verkeerd e-mailadres getypt tijdens het opnieuw instellen van zijn of haar eigen wachtwoord.
    Met vriendelijke groet,
    Apple klantenservice

    Translates as

    To your Apple ID password reset, click on the link below. Then you come to a webpage where you can set a new password.
    This link is valid only for 3 hours, counted from the time of sending this email.
    Apple ID password reset>

    Questions? You may find the answer on our Apple ID support page>
    If you yourself have not tried to reset your password, you need not worry: your account is still safe and nobody has had access. Most likely, someone typed a wrong email address during the reset of his or her own password.
    Apple customer service
  8. macrumors newbie

    May 17, 2012

    My employer received an email like the one davelanger received. Bottom line, it informs you that changes were made to your AppleID and informs you that if you weren’t the one that made the changes you should follow the links. My employer is an iTune subscriber and iPod Shuffle owner. Therefore, they thought it could be legit but still looked a little different from the norm and luckily didn’t follow any links until they could ask me about it. They asked me to investigate. It was very hard at first to tell the difference. But here’s how it goes: I did a search via Google. However, it didn’t show me much. But it did give me a website that I was, at first, reluctant to follow. When I did, the page just kept acting as if it were loading but never left the blank white page. I killed it and went back to my original Google search. Which led me to the forum. While reading the forum I was also on the Apple website. I could see small differences such as flip-flopped words when compared to the email and things in the forum (*giggle* even a few things that forum posters flip-flopped by accident). Ultimately, the first clue was that my employer informed me that they hadn’t accessed the iTunes site in some time. The second clue, were the misspellings between the email and the Apple website. My conclusion, such as it is, is that the email is a fraud. Side-note: On the same day we also received a fraudulent email posing as Myspace. :apple:
  9. macrumors 6502

    Nov 21, 2011
    Very easy, check the header of the email and look for the senders IP then look who belongs to. If you don't know what you looking at you can copy the header and paste here
  10. macrumors 6502

    Mar 19, 2011
    Toronto, Canada
  11. macrumors newbie

    Dec 16, 2012
    No matter if this is legit or not you should never enter your apple id into a link provided by an unsolicited email. If it is Apple they will need to fix it.
    A verification link when followed should say. "Thank you very much", period. You obviously own the email address being verified, because you received the email. The person who sent the request may have sent it to the wrong address, and the user there clicked the link, but you then should get a verification email saying what you did. If you mindlessly say, "OK" then you lose that avenue to recover your password. The person who gets the later verification that you want to reset your password should not have sufficient information to change it.

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