is there a way to make folder/file/app. public?

Discussion in 'macOS' started by sam10685, Apr 14, 2006.

  1. sam10685 macrumors 68000

    sam10685

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    Portland, OR
    #1
    is there a way to make folder/file/app. public?
     
  2. yellow Moderator emeritus

    yellow

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    #2
    Please describe futher what you mean by "public".

    Via what resource? Web? File sharing (AFP or SMB)? SSH? FTP?
     
  3. whooleytoo macrumors 603

    whooleytoo

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    #3
    Public how? Do you mean usable to other users of the computer, or other users on the network, or people over the Internet?
     
  4. yellow Moderator emeritus

    yellow

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    #4
    Also, please tell us what version of OS X you're using.
     
  5. sam10685 thread starter macrumors 68000

    sam10685

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    #5
    sorry... by public i mean every program and application useable by every user on the computer. i'm running 10.4.5.
     
  6. yellow Moderator emeritus

    yellow

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    #6
    OK, still need more info..

    As for Apps, they should already be usable by everyone provided they are in /Applications and/or /Applications/Utilities/

    As for folder/files..

    Well, if you have folder/files that you need to have shared, then you should put them in /Users/Shared/

    Or have a single login, as multiple logins and open permissions to allow any user access to anything in other people's /Users/username defeats the purpose of having multiple users.

    Can you be more specific about what/where files/folders you're trying to allow any user access to?
     
  7. whooleytoo macrumors 603

    whooleytoo

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    #7
    If you want files to be visible by all users, you can save them to -

    Your Public folder (in your home folder)
    The Shared user folder (in Users)
    The root level of your hard drive.

    You might need to double check afterwards if the file has write permission for other users. (in the Get Info panel)
     
  8. mrichmon macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2003
    #8
    Or, more sanely... create a folder at the root level of your hard drive and then save the files in that folder.

    To create a folder and make it possible for all users to save files there and have all users be able to open and modify files there here are the steps that I would use. Open the terminal (from /Applications/Utilities/Terminal).

    For this example we will give the shared folder the name PublicFiles. (For the example commands it is important that the shared folder name does not contain any spaces.)

    In the terminal enter each of the following commands:
    Code:
    sudo mkdir /PublicFiles
    
    sudo chmod a+rwx /PublicFiles
    
    sudo chmod a+t /PublicFiles
    
    This leaves you with a folder that all users can save files into. However, each file saved there will need to be explicitly set to be accessible by all users in the File Info panel. (This is not necessary if all users are administrators.)

    The mkdir command creates the folder (mkdirECTORY). The first chmod command sets the permissions so that everyone can access the folder (chANGE moDE). The second chmod command prevents the folder permissions from being changed in some specific circumstances.
     
  9. whooleytoo macrumors 603

    whooleytoo

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    #9
    Why use the Terminal in that case - why not just use the Finder's Get Info window?
     
  10. mrichmon macrumors 6502a

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    Jun 17, 2003
    #10
    Mostly, for me it is because I spend more than 80% of my computing life in the terminal and always have a terminal window open. :)

    I freely admitted that there are other ways to accomplish the task. This is why I said that I was giving the way I would use. Also, I'm not sure if it is possible to set the sticky bit (chmod a+t) on files using Finder's Get Info window.
     
  11. sam10685 thread starter macrumors 68000

    sam10685

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    #11
    everysingle file and folder on my computer. (documents, movies, songs, ect...) particularly, every song so i can put them in itunes.
     
  12. sam10685 thread starter macrumors 68000

    sam10685

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    #12
    do u know a terminal command that makes the music folder public to all userss?
     
  13. sam10685 thread starter macrumors 68000

    sam10685

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    #13
    i like that quote... except, who is John Siracusa?
     
  14. yellow Moderator emeritus

    yellow

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    #14
    Then I must ask what the point of having multiple logins is? Why not just have one login that autologs in when you restart?
     
  15. sam10685 thread starter macrumors 68000

    sam10685

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    #15
    i don't know. i think people like it when their name is in the top-right corner and not mine.
     
  16. yellow Moderator emeritus

    yellow

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    #16
    Sorry, but that's a piss-poor reason to put yourself through the headache of sharing ALL your (and everyone else's) files with everyone else that logs into the computer. And it is (and will continue to be) a bit of a headache. Screw what they like, make it easy for yourself and just have an autologin to your user OR create a new generic user and copy your stuff to THAT user and have the generic user autologin.
     
  17. whooleytoo macrumors 603

    whooleytoo

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    #17
    I don't have the patience to open the Terminal just to alter permissions (or real posts fully! sorry). What's the purpose of the sticky bit? I'm sure I've heard this before, but can't recall.

    Siracusa is a writer with Arstechnica.com, he writes some of the most in-depth reviews you'll read. He's an outspoken critic of UI and behaviour inconsistencies in OSX and in particular the Finder - but it's very constructive criticism.
     
  18. The Void macrumors regular

    The Void

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