Is "work" a four-letter word

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by commonpeople, May 15, 2006.

  1. commonpeople macrumors regular

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    #1
    From CNN:

    http://www.cnn.com/2006/POLITICS/05/15/clinton.apologize.ap/index.html

    After telling an audience that young people today "think work is a four-letter word," Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton said she apologized to her daughter.

    Umm... does this mean Hillary thinks "work" is a 5 or a 3-letter word? Should we be more concerned about her generation than Chelsea's?
     
  2. miniConvert macrumors 68040

    miniConvert

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    #2
    "she said young people have a sense of entitlement after growing up in a "culture that has a premium on instant gratification.""

    Does she not have a point, though?
     
  3. Blue Velvet Moderator emeritus

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    #3
    It's probably what they saying thousands of years ago... the youth of today have got it so easy, in my day... etc.

    Disastrous way to go about wooing the under-26 vote though; being told that you're bone idle.
     
  4. commonpeople thread starter macrumors regular

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    #4
    What I was wondering was whether she was being knowingly sarcastic in asking if "w-o-r-k" is a 4-letter word? i.e. as opposed to 5 letters or 3 letters? But then- I thought that type of humor is really beyond a politician.
     
  5. Lyle macrumors 68000

    Lyle

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    #5
    Sometimes I wonder if "reading comprehension" is a four-letter word.
     
  6. Dandaman macrumors 6502

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    #6
    hahahahaha, ouch
     
  7. commonpeople thread starter macrumors regular

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    #7
    You mean I'm misunderstanding the text? Explain.
     
  8. calculus Guest

    calculus

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    #8
    Well it is according to Cilla Black...and The Smiths
     
  9. floriflee macrumors 68030

    floriflee

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    #9
    With that said, she does have a point as far as a fair amount of people's attitudes towards work. Young (and some old) of today tend to think more towards instant success/gratification rather than wanting to work their way to the top. Possibly more so than people of the past. We are more spoiled than our predecessors because of technology and whatnot so some have forgetten (or failed to learn) the value of an honest and good work ethic. After seeing a few episodes of "My Sweet Sixteen" on MTV a while ago I questioned how many more spoiled brats we really have today as compared to yesteryear. I know the TV shows are distorting, but it did make me curious.
     
  10. eji macrumors 6502

    eji

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    #10
    It's kind of sad to have to explain this figure of speech to a person who appears to enjoy the music of Pulp and speak English natively, but...

    Clinton means to say that to the current generation "work" is the equivalent of a swear word (many of which have four letters) and is therefore to be avoided.

    And, yeah, it's a terrible way to court the under-26 vote. But the more disastrous Hillary's campaigns, presidential or otherwise, the better. She's the worst the Democrats have to offer.
     
  11. Lyle macrumors 68000

    Lyle

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    #11
    When Senator Clinton remarked that young people today think that work is a "four-letter word", she was sarcastically suggesting that they are offended by the idea of work.

    She was using a figure of speech that's described pretty well in this Wikipedia article. If you are not a native English speaker, or if you're just not old enough to have encountered this expression before, I apologize for being so snarky. ;)
     
  12. commonpeople thread starter macrumors regular

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    #12
    I'm Irish- does that let me off the hook? I'm aware that a 'four-letter word' usually refers to a taboo four-letter word- but I thought it funny to use that expression for an actual 4-letter word such as w-o-r-k.
     
  13. andiwm2003 macrumors 601

    andiwm2003

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    #13
    only if you come up with at least ten 3-letter and ten 5-letter words that could fall into the 4-letter category. :D
     
  14. floriflee macrumors 68030

    floriflee

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    #14
    I thought all taboo four-letter words were actual four letter words, too. :confused: :D

    They all stem from valid sources, have valid definitions, and can (or at least could) be used in contexts where they were not taboo. For example, I've heard from a couple of sources that the F-word has roots in the farming world (that it meant "to plow"). So any "normal" word can be made taboo if the masses make it so. The humor that a normally non-taboo four-letter word is being put into the category of "four-letter words".... Hmm...I guess that could be funny if I didn't look so much into it....
     
  15. commonpeople thread starter macrumors regular

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    #15
    Ahhh, I see that I'm trying to cross the famous humor barrier here! Let me break it down:

    1) A "four-letter word" generally means either a) a swear-word of 4-letters or b) any word that is four letters long.

    2) If someone says that "work" is a 4-letter word, then it implies that they're using meaning a)- i.e. it's a swear word. However, meaning b) also logically applies in this case.

    3) Thus calling "work" a 4-letter word is redundant- since however you slice it- we all agree that it's literally a 4-letter word.

    It's a bit like me saying that Vic Chesnutt is the "Bob Dylan" of Folk music.

    Please! Someone tell me that it's not only me who sees the (perhaps unintended) humor in Hill's statement!
     
  16. commonpeople thread starter macrumors regular

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    #16
    By saying that the younger generation think that w-o-r-k is a 4-letter word- Hill's implying that wiser people (such as herself) know that it's not a 4-letter word. That's kinda the point I was making.
     
  17. andiwm2003 macrumors 601

    andiwm2003

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    #17
    i was just hoping to get a set of irish 3 and 5 letter swear words that pass the indecency filters here.;)
     
  18. commonpeople thread starter macrumors regular

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    #18
    Pogue Mahone! for 11.
     
  19. floriflee macrumors 68030

    floriflee

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    #19
    I got it when you said it the first time. Perhaps, I wasn't clear, but what I was trying to say is that I don't see the humor the way you do. :D
     
  20. thedude110 macrumors 68020

    thedude110

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    #20
    I dunno ... I think it could come back around as a positive. Hit a group in their collective lighthearted stereotype (gen x or post gen x), apologize in a very personal way, recognizing that error of your words has upset your own family -- it humanizes her and makes her seem reflective and honest.

    It might even have the effect of making many say "yeah, I don't work as hard as I could," pushing them toward some self-reflection (people like tough love, etc.).

    Of course, the real challenge will be for the hard working among us to get the lazy butts of every generation away from their HD TVs and into voting booths in 2006 and 2008 ...
     
  21. Boggle macrumors 6502

    Boggle

    #21
    Actually, with all the GOOD political humor out there like Hookergate, what we should be worried about is your attempt @ double entendre. :rolleyes:

    Sorry commonpeople, this one was a dud.
     
  22. Sun Baked macrumors G5

    Sun Baked

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    #22
    Get the away to vote :confused:

    Be hard to pry the sofa spuds off the couch to do anything that'll make them sweat. :(
     
  23. commonpeople thread starter macrumors regular

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    #23
    Whatev! Beats working.
     
  24. Boggle macrumors 6502

    Boggle

    #24
    With spelling like that I can only assume you're trying to prove Hillary right on both counts. :D

    But yes, it does beat working. I think that was her problem with, "Generation Y-bother."
     
  25. commonpeople thread starter macrumors regular

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    #25
    Generation X-actly, generation y-bother and generation zzzzzzz.

    Then there's the letters that come after z.
     

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