isn't the core duo a mobile processor?

Discussion in 'Mac Pro' started by magicmonkey, Jan 17, 2006.

  1. magicmonkey macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2006
    #1
    I'm sorry if this has been covered before.

    I'm just curious if anyone knows why Apple have used the core Duo in the new iMac. The intel site describes it as a mobile processor. From my experiance that means slightly lower performance but better power use.

    cheers
     
  2. MRU macrumors demi-god

    MRU

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2005
    Location:
    Ireland
    #2
    Yes it's generally a mobile chip, but it's ideal in small formfactor cases and requires less cooling than the G5.. Hence it's usage in the iMac..

    Lower performance.. Not necesserily, in comparison to current machines it looks like the new chipset will be a noticeable improvement..
     
  3. gekko513 macrumors 603

    gekko513

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    Oct 16, 2003
    #3
    slightly lower performance but better power use is ideal for the iMac.
     
  4. magicmonkey thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Jan 15, 2006
    #4
    ah ok. Thanks for the comments.

    So when the Power Mac gets replaced there should be quite a big performance improvement as I guess they won't be using core duos.
     
  5. MRU macrumors demi-god

    MRU

    Joined:
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    Ireland
    #5
    Definetly.. Memron looks very good and if the boost the mid range and laptops have received with the coreduo (looks like they match the powermac dual 2 - 2.3hz in some respects) then Memron should prove a great boost in performance for the Powermacs (or whatever they call them - MacStation maybe).. Most software should be available in Universal by then too...
     
  6. PlaceofDis macrumors Core

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    Jan 6, 2004
    #6
    i don't think the powermacs will even get memron though. more likely than not they will get intel's conroe processor which is due out later this year as well. and i think the powermacs will be the very last line to be switched over.
     
  7. Spectrum macrumors 6502a

    Spectrum

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    UK
    #7
    What I find interesting is this page, which seems to suggest that only the 1.67 core duo used in the new powerbook could be low power - 1.83, and 2.0 are higher voltage.

    I'm not sure what this says about the power consumption of the 1.67 vs 1.83 notebooks.
     
  8. gekko513 macrumors 603

    gekko513

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2003
    #8
    I would guess that Apple uses the high voltage 1.67 GHz version since it's much cheaper. Since these are mobile chips they're pretty low power even in their high power versions.

    Edit: Oh, and it's Merom, not Memron.
     
  9. Sunrunner macrumors 6502a

    Sunrunner

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    Nov 27, 2003
    #9
    I agree. Apple will want to work out all the bugs and harware integration issues with the lower-powered machines before it makes another run at "most powerfull" with its flagship hardware...
     
  10. Chaszmyr macrumors 601

    Chaszmyr

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2002
    #10
    It's true that the Core Duo is a mobile chip, and it's also true that Apple could put any desktop chip into the iMac G5 (after all, they had a G5 in there), but the Core Duo is the latest and greatest chip on the market. It's not exactly the fastest, but I'd say it's hands down the all around best chip dollar for dollar.
     
  11. law guy macrumors 6502a

    law guy

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2003
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    Western Massachusetts
    #12
    A better version of the table mentioned above (on the intel site, the direct link is no longer working) with wattage (since the link is not bringing up the table anymore, the non low power was 31 watts and the low power was 15 watts) and some links to information on the current Intel roadmap and timing:

    http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?t=172909
     
  12. magicmonkey thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Jan 15, 2006
    #13
    Seems like someone else thinks 64 bit is the way to go too:


    Caris & Company analyst Mark Stahlman has voiced concerns that Apple's rapid growth of computer sales over the past year is starting to slow.

    Apple CEO Steve Jobs revealed that the company sold 1.25 million Macs in the last quarter, an increase of little more than five per cent on the previous three months, which Stahlman described as 'less-than-exciting'.

    'With perhaps 135 per cent year-over-year sales growth for iPods and only 5 per cent for Macs in the quarter, Apple's computer sales momentum is waning,' he said.

    He noted that Wall Street's reaction to the unveiling of the new Intel Macs - which sent the share price to a new high of $86.4 yesterday - should be tempered with realism.

    'Intel's own roadmap implies that much of the "good stuff" won't appear until the end of calendar 2006, when next-generation Conroe and Merom [chipsets] are due to ship in volume,' he warned, adding that the introduction of new Macs later this year will coincide and possibly be overshadowed by the release of Microsoft's new Vista operating system.

    The analyst also warned that Apple may lose some of its 'premium lustre' because the Intel chips it will be using may be out-gunned by the 64-bit processors from AMD, particularly in laptops.

    'As impressive as the computer-intensive benchmarks offered by Apple might be, there is no way to avoid the fact that Intel's Core Duo processor is a 32-bit engine that is fundamentally obsolete in a 64-bit x86 world,' he said.

    http://www.macuser.co.uk/?news/news_story.php?id=82157 need to register to view

    But I'm sure that there will be processor upgrades at the end of the year. Or announced at next years key note.
     
  13. bousozoku Moderator emeritus

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    Jun 25, 2002
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    Gone but not forgotten.
    #14
    Who? :D That's old news and he's a big no one, working for a no name company and looking for fame.

    The only place 64-bit computing is going to affect most people using an iMac is if 3D games and OpenGL were made 64-bit, so it's not really an issue. The only practical effect 64-bit(ness) had on Macs is in the 42-bit memory bus that allowed more than 4 GB of RAM. There may be a time when Apple has a 64-bit operating system but it doesn't seem to be any time soon. Mac OS X merely allows 64-bit computing, it doesn't embrace it.

    Core Duo may be transitional but it seems to be a good design and, if the cores can be turned on and off as necessary, it would seem to be rather energy efficient with better than average performance.
     

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