joehoeee I am going to London!

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by dali, Dec 14, 2005.

  1. dali macrumors member

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2005
    #1
    I just heard today that I got a job in London to do my internship. It is going to be a 6 month period starting from the end of January. So I will be living in Londen until the end of June.

    I just wanted to tell you but does somebody have tips for me?:)
     
  2. J@ffa macrumors 6502a

    J@ffa

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2002
    Location:
    Behind you!
    #2
    I presume you'll be going and leaving 9-5; well, the tube is absolute murder at peak times. If you've ever seen pictures of Japan showing the way that people get bundled onto packed carriages by attendants, it's like that, except no-one pushes you on, so you just have to bundle aboard.

    Culturally, remember that although everyone does drink tea, no-one talks like Mary Poppins :)D), talking in a queue is almost the law, and that jaywalking isn't illegal!

    If you've got any more specific questions, hit me. :)
     
  3. Sly macrumors 6502

    Sly

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2003
    Location:
    Airstrip One
    #3
    On a brighter note, congratulations on your internship. London is one of, if not the greatest city in the world. The underground system is very efficient (normally) you will use it lots, it can be busy in the rush hours as mentioned - tip make you way to the ends of the train as most people can't be bothered to walk to the end of the platform, so its less crowded. My best advice to familiarize yourself would be to get an good guide book and take a walk the main part of the city is surprisingly small and there is so much to see. Start with the Apple Store which is right by Oxford Circus / Regent St. Underground exit :cool:
     
  4. Tel macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2005
    Location:
    England
    #4
    Remember, as a foreigner, it will be your DUTY to learn every bit of Cockney rhyming slang and use it whenever you can. It is also the LAW that you must ask every londoner you meet if they know the Queen. Failure to do this will land you in serious trouble. ;)
     
  5. crazycat macrumors 65816

    crazycat

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2005
    #5
    I learned that the hard way :(
     
  6. Applespider macrumors G4

    Applespider

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    Jan 20, 2004
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    looking through rose-tinted spectacles...
    #6
    Except in London where talking to anyone will get you odd looks unless it's about mutual misery which has gone on for more than the average time. For example, if the tube line breaks down, no-one will really start tutting and exchanging glances until you've been sat in the tunnel for 15 minutes.

    Unless you're lucky enough to find non-Londoners in a queue, take a book and be prepared! You should never be without a book or paper on public transport; there is nothing worse than only having the ads to keep you occupied.

    The trains into the main termini are the exception to walk to the 'front' rule. Everyone crams on the first two carriages so they can get through the ticket barriers more quickly; easier to walk the length of the platform while you're waiting for the train rather than when you're at the destination along with everyone else. Otherwise, you'll find regular commuters know where the exit at their destinations are so you'll find the carriages that will stop at popular station packed.

    Get a copy of loot or look online for it to find accommodation if it's not being provided. There are hundreds of flatshares on there in a variety of areas. Walking around is a great idea; the London Walks company do some great walks that even Londoners can learn a lot on. Have a good A-Z - it will save you masses of time in central London to cut through backstreets rather than following the tourist herd. The best bars/restaurants are generally off the beaten track too.
     
  7. dali thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2005
    #7
    Ohoh Now I am scared :eek:

    I am really looking forward to it, I am going to London especially to learn the language better. Little bit afraid of the metros though....Thank you for the tips! What does Jaywalking means? :eek:

    Do you know anything about the area "docks" (or something like that?) I heard that it is not really a good neighbourhood, is that true? I am looking for housing (expensive!) right now, thats why I am asking...

    Didn't see the post of applespider yet, thank you for the information, it is really helpfull! Do you have delays a lot in public transportation?

    One stupid question: Do people ride bikes in London, or does everybody go by public transport?
     
  8. Applespider macrumors G4

    Applespider

    Joined:
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    looking through rose-tinted spectacles...
    #8
    Where are you going to be working? Aim to be as close to there as possible. Docklands has good bits and bad bits (like most places). There's a lot of relatively new housing down there; and if you're working at Canary Wharf, it's ideal.

    It's a standard joke for Londoners. In all honesty, it's not always as bad as it is made out to be but when things go wrong, they tend to be at the worse possible times. To be fair, the last time I got stuck in a tunnel for any more than 5 minutes was about 4 months ago so I guess it's not that common!

    People do but not in the same style as they do in the Netherlands from what I've seen. Cyclists have very few concessions made to them, the traffic is very heavy and there aren't that many cycle lanes (you tend to share them with buses).
     
  9. Sly macrumors 6502

    Sly

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2003
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    Airstrip One
    #9
    The Tube is easy really, I would advise you to look at the tube map before you get to the platform and work out which stop is before and after yours as it is easy to get on the train going in the wrong direction. It is not immediately obvious when you come down the escalator with loads of people behind you which side of the platform you need. If you do get it wrong it is not hard to get off at the next stop and swap sides. :) 'Jaywalking' is an Americanism for crossing the road not on a proper pedestrian crossing. Loads of people do it in London but its not very clever as the streets are busy, I'm not aware of it being illegal however, certainly your unlikely to get in to trouble for it unless you cause an accident?

    London Docks or The Docklands has undergone massive redevelopment over the last 20 years and is now one of the smartest parts of the City. I would strongly advise you to visit Canary Wharf during your stay, although a day time visit is better than night as most people who work there go home at night. If you can afford lodgings in the Docklands area I would take them, the facilities are great and I find it to be a safe (or as safe as you can get in a big city) area. Transportation is also very good from this area with the DLR & Tube .
    No more than any other city ;)

    Personally I would not cycle in London, its not exactly a Mecca for bikes like Holland! Cycle lanes are appearing but it is still dangerous and fume filled. There is also a very good chance your bike will not stay where you leave it!
     
  10. greatdevourer macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2005
    #10
    If you really want to ride your bike, come up to Cambridge. As about 90% of the population are students, parking is expensive and busses are shîte, so almost everyone cycles (including me :D)
     
  11. dali thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2005
    #11
    Thank you everybody for this! Really great!

    One more question: I need to call home once in a while, of course I use Skype but I also need a cellphone. Can you get a (i really dont know how you call this in English)"subscription" for 6 months or only for a year or 2 years? (hope you know what I mean)
     
  12. Applespider macrumors G4

    Applespider

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2004
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    looking through rose-tinted spectacles...
    #12
    You can do 'Pay as you go' where you buy credits as you need them. The phones are usually dearer if you want a new model but you can pick up a decent phone for £50 or less. If you have one currently, chances are it will work and you'd only need to get hold of a UK PAYG simcard from one of the networks.
     
  13. Sly macrumors 6502

    Sly

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Airstrip One
    #13
    You can buy what is called 'pay as you go' which means you buy the phone, starting at around £40 and then you only pay for the calls you use, no subscription or rental
     

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