Judge's Novel Da Vinci Code

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by UKnjb, Apr 27, 2006.

  1. UKnjb macrumors 6502a

    UKnjb

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    #1
    The BBC has published these details on their web-site.

    In order to save you time/effort, the relevant letters marked out in his judgement are:

    smithycodeJaeiextostgpsacgreamqwfkadpmqzvin

    Any takers from MR to crack this?
     
  2. nbs2 macrumors 68030

    nbs2

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    #2
    33 letters - to big for all those anagram machines on the net (the biggest i've seen is 30 letters)
     
  3. dejo Moderator

    dejo

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    #3
    qatar faq jaws spitz vex mick egg mop den?









    I'll keep trying...
     
  4. sarae macrumors 6502

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    #4
    Just a stab in the dark, but if you take out all the letters that spell "the da vinci code" you're left with:

    smiywokJaextstgpsagreamqfpmqz
     
  5. Don't panic macrumors 603

    Don't panic

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    #5
    but if you take away Jaeiextostgpsacgreqwfkdpmqv,
    you remain with:
    AMAZIN'
    in the exact order!





    amazin'!
     
  6. Chundles macrumors G4

    Chundles

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    #6
    Two q's. No u's. Is it another language? Latin?
     
  7. Shamus macrumors 6502a

    Shamus

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    #7
    I think you might be on the right track there Chundles.

    It will be interesting to see how this code works, and what it says! :) (assuming that someone will work it out eventually :p)
     
  8. iSaint macrumors 603

    iSaint

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    #8
    maybe he got one if his kids to do some l33t for him
     
  9. Shamus macrumors 6502a

    Shamus

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    #9
    hehe, possible...but maybe he knows leet himself, maybe he is a bit of a computer boffin :p
     
  10. UKnjb thread starter macrumors 6502a

    UKnjb

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    #10
    Code Broken !!!!

    All participants were close ---- so very very close.

    However, 2 UK newspapers (The Times and The Guardian) got it right.

    So. So competition over and --- Well Done to the collective and superior intellects of MR!! :) :confused:

    Full(ish) report here

    **** Competition Now Over --- It's Official ****
     
  11. Veldek macrumors 68000

    Veldek

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    #11
    I didn't read the solution, but I'm slightly confused that the "translation" has one letter less than the original code. :confused:
     
  12. gauchogolfer macrumors 603

    gauchogolfer

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    #12

    The bbc article has the following quote from the judge.
     
  13. Shamus macrumors 6502a

    Shamus

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    #13
    Well done! It's nice to see that a bit of fun was added to the court sentence , and that the code was cracked! :)
     
  14. UKnjb thread starter macrumors 6502a

    UKnjb

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    #14
    You are in such a minority, Shamus. The feedback on the various related sites here (BBC etc) was that the judge should stick to judging and not waste tax-payers' money on indulging in this sort of stuff. :( Very disapproving. Me, I thought it was great.
     
  15. MongoTheGeek macrumors 68040

    MongoTheGeek

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    #15
    Perhaps. There is a history though of judges getting creative with rulings. Some come to mind recently where rulings have come down in verse. Perhaps its a side effect of the judiciary being reigned in by tradition and legislatures that they express individuality any way they can.
     
  16. UKnjb thread starter macrumors 6502a

    UKnjb

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    #16
    You're right. i was listening to the radio, I think last night, and there was a quote about another judge (and I paraphrase). The gulity defendant, who had been sent down for 10 years by the judge, had called the judge the "c" word. Out loud! Like that! And the judge replied that, whereas the defendant was going to be in the pokey for the next 10 years, without any home comforts etc, he, the judge was going to go home, have a beer, be with his wife etc. So he asked the defendant who was the "c" word now? Cracked me up.
     
  17. Shamus macrumors 6502a

    Shamus

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    #17
    Yes, I guessed that some people would respond in this way. But when you think about it, it was a 71 page report. That takes alot of time to do. Now the actual construction of the code took less than an hour and a half. I think that for the value and interest it spurred, it was worth it. Im glad you thought it was good too. :)
     
  18. dejo Moderator

    dejo

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    #18
    Well, it's been solved!

    Judge's own Da Vinci code cracked

    I'd still like to see a better explanation of the solution.
     
  19. Shamus macrumors 6502a

    Shamus

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    #19
    I somewhat agree. They have cracked the code, now it is time to discover the meaning behind this cryptic solution.
     
  20. dejo Moderator

    dejo

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    #20
    Well, the article does talk about the meaning of the solution ("The judge admires Admiral Jackie Fisher, who developed battleship HMS Dreadnought, which launched in February 1906, 100 years before the case began.") but I'm wanting to hear how to get from the supposed random jumble of letters to the solution of 'Jackie Fisher who are you Dreadnought'.
     
  21. UKnjb thread starter macrumors 6502a

    UKnjb

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    #21
    Can I suggest that you apply the basic Fibonacci series of numbers to the Judge's sequence of letters (it was given as a clue in the linked article of one of my previous posts) ? Think offset to the alphabet. :)
     
  22. dejo Moderator

    dejo

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    #22
    Well, first off "jaeiextostgpsacgreamqwfkadpmqzvin" has one more character then "jackiefisherwhoareyoudreadnought", so that starts off confusing.

    Ignoring that, let's see what I can come up with:

    jaeiextostgpsacgreamqwfkadpmqzvin

    0, 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55...

    So, then, j +/- 0 = j

    And a +/- 1 = a ???

    EDIT: Got it! Guess the judge started his Fibonacci at 1, like in the book.
     
  23. UKnjb thread starter macrumors 6502a

    UKnjb

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    #23
    Congratulations!!!! Sorry I didn't get back earlier, but I had to sleep. :)

    The Times published the method for solving it here and The Guardian has a similar, although generally unhelpful explanation here.
     
  24. Shamus macrumors 6502a

    Shamus

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    #24
    Well done! :) The numerical part makes sense to me now.
     
  25. dejo Moderator

    dejo

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    #25
    F.y.i.

    Initial code: SMITHYCODEJAEIEXTOSTGPSACGREAMQWFKADPMQZVZ

    Translated: SMITHYCODEJAFKIEFISTHRWHOAREBOUDREADQOUGHT

    Typos corrected: SMITHYCODEJACKIEFISHERWHOAREYOUDREADNOUGHT

    Or: Smithy Code Jackie Fisher who are you Dreadnought
     

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