Just got my refurbished 12 inch powerbook AND...

Discussion in 'General Mac Discussion' started by Rankin, Dec 9, 2004.

  1. Rankin macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2004
    #1
    Hello,
    I quickly opened the box yesterday just before going out and looked at the beauty. I thought I'd better start it up to see if all is ok. It started up fine but then a symbol Ive never seen before (a circle with a slash through it like a no smoking sign) appeared on the screen and just remained there. I turned it off and on again and same thing. Anyone know what this means? What do i do????
     
  2. caveman_uk Guest

    caveman_uk

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2003
    Location:
    Hitchin, Herts, UK
    #2
    It means it can't boot for some reason. Ring Apple and return it.
     
  3. Rankin thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2004
    #3
    Do you think starting up from the boot up disk and reformatting the mac will help?
     
  4. bubbamac macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2003
    #4
    Using the boot disk might help, but let Apple deal with it.

    Return it. Today.
     
  5. Sabbath macrumors 6502a

    Sabbath

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2003
    Location:
    London
    #5
    I would return it, politely push the idea that you need the laptop asap and thought you could rely ont the quality of Apple's refurbs and you may well get a new 12" for your toubles, not that there is much difference between the refurbs and the new ones if it's the same model. It just means you would likely get it a bit sooner.
     
  6. TLRedhawke macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2004
    #6
    Wow, I am consistently amazed that a board full of Mac fanatics can only come up with the dumb consumer tactic #1: If it does not work on the first attempt, return it. It's about as useful as the other common answer that shows up around here, that being, "Take it to the Apple Store and let them deal with it".

    First of all, many of you are making the assumption that he bought this refurbished machine from Apple. In all likelihood, he may well not have. He may have bought it from another company, or some guy, and as such, returning the machine would be much more of a hassle.

    Try booting from the recovery discs (presuming you were given them), and see what happens. It may be something as simple as the hard drive was wiped, and no OS installed. Worst case scenario, the hard drive could be bad. So, attempt to use the recovery discs. If that's no good, either attempt to return it (where possible), or get whomever you bought the machine from to dole out for a new hard drive. Hard drive is a bit of a pain, so you may want to let a pro do it.
     
  7. Rankin thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2004
    #7
    Cheers for all your replies!!! I actually did buy it from Apple. Thing is Im leaving for Sweden tonight and back on Tuesday night so not much I can do til then. I did call the apple guys and they said to call them back when I return and it should be a quick thing over the phone. Fingers crossed though!

    Just one dumb question. How do I actually get a recovery disc in there if the powerbook doesnt startup and just gives me the prohib symbol when trying to start up?
     
  8. keysersoze macrumors 68000

    keysersoze

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2004
    Location:
    NH
    #8
    Just stick the CD in anyway, when you are looking at the no-smoking symbol. Then restart your computer, probably with a cold-reboot (hold down power key til the computer shuts down... then hit power key again to restart).

    Hold down the C-key when you hit the power key to restart the computer... this will boot the system from the CD.


    Hopefully.

    :) ;)
     
  9. Rankin thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2004
    #9
    Cheers I will try that when I get back. Thanks for everyones help. I just want a normal turkey for xmas, not an apple turkey! :)
     
  10. jholzner macrumors 65816

    jholzner

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2002
    Location:
    Champaign, IL
    #10
    My friend got a refub ibook and the same thing happened. Apple shipped it without the OS installed!!! Of course, they includeded the panther disks with the ibook so I just installed it and everything was fine. Still, seems kinda dumb for them to not install the OS!
     
  11. ChrisFromCanada macrumors 65816

    ChrisFromCanada

    Joined:
    May 3, 2004
    Location:
    Hamilton, Ontario (CANADA)
    #11
    Ya I would say it is pretty likely that the only problem is you have no OS installed. Boot from the CD and try installing 10.3.
     
  12. slipper macrumors 68000

    slipper

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2003
    #12
    Personally, i would never buy a refurb from Apple. From my experience, Apple repair facility SUCKS! I turned in my iBook for repair 3 times, according to the local Apple Store genius, for logic board problems. Two of the 3 times, it came back defective on arrival. One of those times with a very noticable speaker clicking problem and the other time the computer was just completely DEAD. and between the three times its been in and out of Apple Care, its gotten really scratched up, especially on the sides, showing very noticable signs the iBook has been pryed apart. sorry had to vent a little, but thats my explaination why i wouldnt buy a refurb.
     
  13. parrothead macrumors 6502a

    parrothead

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    Sep 24, 2003
    Location:
    Edmonds, WA
    #13
    That is absolutely not the dumb consumer tactic that you think it is. If there is some problem, say with the logic board, nothing he can do to the computer will help. Even if he manages to start up the computer once, who's to say the problem won't come back. When you buy something from a company it is absolutely acceptable to expect it to work when you take it out of the box. It shouldn't matter if it is a refurb or not, it still should work.

    Say it was a certified used car he just bought. He finishes signing the papers and gets in the car to drive away and boom, the head gasket blows. Would you consider it dumb to demand a different car or his money back or would you consider it dumb to shrug his shoulders and tow the car to a garage and spend lots of money and time to get it fixed? :rolleyes:
     
  14. keysersoze macrumors 68000

    keysersoze

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2004
    Location:
    NH
    #14
    I had a brand new iBook fresh out of the box, die on me in every way possible. Logic Board. RAM. Then Hard Drive. All over the course of 2 months.

    My current G5 is an authentic refurb and it's been problem free, save for some firmware issues. It hasn't had to go into the shop once.
     
  15. mkaake macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2003
    Location:
    mi
    #15
    i bought a refurb emac. got a top of the line machine for 700 shipped (nix a superdrive, which i didn't want anyway), with AE, the larger hard drive (60 gig at the time), panther, jaguar, 9.2, blah blah blah. Ordered it tuesday night, it shipped wedensday morning. had it just a few days later (free shipping). it got there with nary a scratch. there's no way that a person would be able to tell from looking at or using my computer that it was a refurb. so when i think about the price break i got, the same warranty a new buyer would get, and the problem free experience i had, using a machine that couldn't be told apart from a new one, i'd be compelled to disagree with you a little bit on that.
    worst case scenario with a refurb is you get a bad one, call apple, and have them replace it. worth the rare hassle, IMHO...
     
  16. TLRedhawke macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2004
    #16
    Did I once suggest that he dole out money to fix this problem? This isn't an issue of a failed logic board, it's one of an absent OS. More importantly, the problem can be solved by the use of the very discs that Apple has provided. To use the used car analogy, this is more like discovering a couple of bad sparkplugs, and remembering that the dealer left a pack of new ones in the glove box. It takes minimal work to fix the problem, and costs no money. IF it turns out to be a bad hard drive, I do recall suggesting he return it.

    Having worked in retail for the better part of my life, I know what a terrible idea it is to just return a product if it doesn't work perfectly at first. While in this case, something was actually wrong, I've had too many people to count attempt to return wireless cards, software, peripherals, and even screen cleaner because they were unable to make it work immediately. Not only did they not call the manufacturers to see if they had done something wrong, they often call my store for tech support. I'm not Apple tech support, yet I've received calls as to how to turn on an iMac, fresh out of the box, how to install ram, and so on, over the phone! I don't mind installing ram, or some other simple installations in person. I am not, however, paid to talk one through it over the phone. But, it's dumb consumer idea #2: If it doesn't work, call the person who sold it to you. It's just as unreasonable as trying to return it.

    Back to the initial point, sometimes computers, and computer equipment need some installation to work at first. Drivers need to be installed, preferences need to be set, and so on. As such, you should make an honest attempt to make the machine work before attempting to return it. In this case, try to run the recovery discs. It's a simple procedure, and takes minimal effort. Just as mucking with the Airport preferences, or reseeding it will often fix up any difficulties. Only return a product when you know, to the best of your ability, that it is defective. Do not return product when the problem clearly exists between the keyboard and the chair. That being said, in this case, no, he did not cause the problem, but it can't hurt to try and fix it (through minimal effort). It's a bit of work to save the hassle of sending the product back to Apple, only to have them run the recovery discs, then send it back.
     
  17. bubbamac macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2003
    #17
    I've got no beef with trying to make something work with a minor fix out of the box. But:

    This isn't a wireless card, or screen cleaners, or setting prefs - it's a high dollar, complex item with a long life span that won't start up.

    It's not like they shipped an app separately that was supposed to be preinstalled, or somone's email got left on the machine - it's the Operating System that can't be found.

    When I buy high dollar stuff, and it's got stuff wrong with it, it goes right back to where I bought it from, unless I can fix it quickly and easily, and I KNOW it won't affect me in the long run. Also, any fix I attempt should not void any warranty. No OS doesn't apply.

    Ship it back.
     
  18. Counterfit macrumors G3

    Counterfit

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2003
    Location:
    sitting on your shoulder
    #18
    Which is quicker and easier: booting from a CD and clicking a few buttons, then waiting an hour or two for the install, or shipping it out, and waiting days for its return. Never mind that this could happen later on (don't get me started on whether you can really "know" something ;)), and it certainly wouldn't void your warranty.

    Don't. it's a waste of your time, their time, their money, and your time. Yes, I know I put "your time" twice. :rolleyes:
     
  19. bubbamac macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2003
    #19
    I think we can agree that we disagree, though, and since you're here and I'm here, isn't it "our time?"
     
  20. TLRedhawke macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2004
    #20
    It would most definitely be nothing but a waste of time, considering Apple would just run the very same recovery discs I'm suggesting he run in this case. Installing an OS most certainly does not void the warranty, nor does it take any appreciable amount of time. It is a minor fix.

    As for your ideals, Bubbamac, as to when you ought to be returning things, it seems as if you're the sort that a retailer wouldn't lift a finger for. The actions taken by an individual entirely determine my course of action. The ruder, and more unwilling to make attempts to fix the problem, the less likely I'll be of help.

    For instance, two customers attempt to return external CDRWs. My return policy says 7 days, original condition, with a restocking fee. One customer comes in, explains the situation calmly, that he's spent hours on the phone with the manufacturer, and he cannot get the machine to work with his beige G3. It was purchased nearly a month ago, but I returned it, with a restock. Another customer comes in, drops the CDRW on the counter, and tells me it doesn't work. Being dutiful, I plug it in to one of the demo machines, and it reads a disc. So, not defective. He says he couldn't make it work. It was purchased 9 days ago. He hadn't called the manufacturer, or attempted any particular solution. I refused the return.
     
  21. parrothead macrumors 6502a

    parrothead

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2003
    Location:
    Edmonds, WA
    #21

    While I agree with you that it is far easier to attempt to try to fix a problem when it comes up before sending it back, I feel that a computer should, at the very least, start up when you get it out of the box. It may not be true in this case, but most people with the same problem as the thread poster would have no clue how to use the software recovery discs or even that that would be the solution. Apple ships their OS pre-installed, period. If a computer is shipped without the OS, they should absolutely be held liable for that problem and they should fix it. If the customer knows how to fix the problem, then more power to them. If they dont, or ar not willing, Apple, or any retailer should fix it for them.


    If you get so annoyed dealing with your customers, then perhaps it is time to find another line of work. Try to remember that it is your job to deal with people. I have worked in the retail business before and let me tell you it is nothing compared to working in the tourist industry (Dive instructor). Dealing with the idiotic and rude things that people say and do that could easily get them killed was just part of the job. Those that didnt like dealing with it got bitter and had horrible customer service. No good for anyone. You dont like the used car analogy, try this, You sold them the computer with no OS on it. They come in to return it after 10 days. They may be a little ticked because they spend $2000 on something that didn't work. Do you think it is right to just say tough, no returns go fix it yourself?
     
  22. TLRedhawke macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2004
    #22
    Well, let's put it this way. If I phoned Apple, and said that there was a 12" PowerBook with no OS installed, they would tell me to run the recovery discs. It's really that simple. If you were to call Apple tech support, they would happily tell you how to boot from the discs. I love my job, but I hate stupid customers. More importantly, I hate customers who aren't willing to make a reasonable attempt. Is it so much to ask to just call Apple before bringing it back? They would probably give you the option of running the discs, via their instructions, or returning it, and spending weeks without a machine so that they can do the work for you. If Apple chooses to replace the machine, that's all well and good, and it's up to them. Ought you not to call them first rather than just return the machine? That's the sort of people that get bad service. It's the golden rule. Do unto others as you would have them do unto you. If you're nice, patient, and perfectly reasonable, customer service reps will bend over backwards for you. If you're rude, and don't want to attempt to deal with the problem, then they won't lift a finger for you.

    Apple preinstalls the OS, yes, but remember, they don't warrant it. Nowhere in the warranty is the OS covered. They preinstall it as a courtesy, and because everyone else sells machines with preinstalled OSs. As a law student, this has major significance. It means that they will fix your hardware, but they remove themselves from liability for data loss. Moreover, they are under no obligation to install, reinstall, or upgrade your OS. That's up to you to do. Resellers are in the same boat. They can charge you to reinstall the OS, or someone may do it free of charge, of their own volition. but I can tell you right now that I would never install an OS for someone who did not attempt to do it on their own. The most I would do is tell them how to do it. And since that's as simple as holding C while the machine starts up, it's no skin off my back. It's my job to deal with customers, yes, but if we want to get technical, it's really my job to sell them things. That's what I'm paid for, as that's what makes money. Giving good service helps to sell things. However, where someone wants everything to work out of the box, without any reasonable attempts of their own, and wants to return it if it doesn't, then it's unlikely I'll be able to sell them all that much anyway. We have a service department that will happily deal with all your unwillingness to try for a price. I'm not going to do the work for you for free. The only times I am is where you've really tried, and need the help.

    I'm under an obligation to deal with customers, but that by no means indicates that they are somehow inherently right. They just like to think they are. The greatest joy involved in my job is snapping customers out of that mode of thought in as harsh a manner allowable.
     
  23. jeremy.king macrumors 603

    jeremy.king

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2002
    Location:
    Fuquay Varina, NC
    #23
    Try this first

    http://docs.info.apple.com/article.html?artnum=106805

    If no success, return it :eek:
     
  24. bubbamac macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2003
    #24

    This is probably the best course of action, and I guess I would have tried this first, upon second (or third) thought.

    It really depends on what I'm buying as to what I do with it. I do make every reasonable effort, within my limitations, my expectations, and my understanding of the return policy. Really.

    And I'm nice about it. I wouldn't return this guy's iBook with a nasty-gram, I'd call first (leading to your excellent solution) and be polite. Whenever I return a product, I make sure to explain what I've tried, why I've tried it, and ask what else I could have tried. It's almost never the fault of the person I'm talking to - they just have a job to do. They may be able to help me, or explain a better way. But a positive attitude on my part almost always gets be good results.

    How happy I am with the purchase depends not only how well the product works, but how I'm treated if I have a problem. If this happens to me:

    I assure you I both know it, and act accordingly. I do NOT fool around with representatives of companies like this, and I DO make sure I tell my friends/aquaintances/anyone I can about this type of attitude - assuming I can't get satisfaction higher up the chain. I have gotten people fired for this type of attitude, and fired them myself when I was in that position. I have no regrets about reporting this type of behavior to the responsible parties, whether at my company or another.

    I work in a service industry where people are out of their element, and frequently do, well, stupid things. But as long as they're nice about it, I do what I can, or more. I also try to explain what's going on, so they're better informed next time. If they're not nice about it, I still do what I can, because it's my job.

    It's not people's actions that irk me - it's their attitude. If the above is your attitude when dealing with customers, I'd also suggest a change, if only temporarily. If you're not removed (under your own power or not), you will do harm to your companies' business in the long run. Remember, make one customer mad, he'll tell 10 more - and those 10 more are your future livelihood. Worse, most customers that you make mad (and I assure you they know, too), will not take it to a higher level within the company, they'll just go badmouth your business. Your supervisors, if you have them, know this.

    BTW - if you're good to me, I tell everyone too - because even fewer happy people take it up the ladder.
     
  25. mrwonkers macrumors 6502

    mrwonkers

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2004
    Location:
    Cyberia
    #25
    :rolleyes: I also work in retail and think it is unreasonable that sales people would adopt an attitude like yours. Especially with customers who are spending their hard earned dollars supporting the products you sell.
    I feel pity for the poor customer who has to deal with you.
    If I where faced with the choice of purchasing from you I know I would definately go elsewhere.......WAKE UP.. :eek: ..You are in customer service not wonderland Alice.........
     

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