KDE, GNOME, KOFFICE AND FRIENDS...

Discussion in 'Mac Apps and Mac App Store' started by AmigoMac, Mar 10, 2004.

  1. AmigoMac macrumors 68020

    AmigoMac

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2003
    Location:
    l'Allemagne
    #1
    Hello world, I want to try some apps on MAC OS X, something like a computing center from my mac. I don't want to get a pc for 2-3 apps only.

    1- Will be 1 GB RAM enough to run Autocad or Orcad with virtual PC smoothly? Not at the same time, of course... :)

    2-Has someone already run orcad under VPC?

    3- is VPC worth?

    4-Which OS will run better under VPC?

    5-Has someone worked with KDE/GNOME under Mac OS X? Is it fast enough? (I want to give it a try)

    6-Just read some KDE apps can run directly on Mac OS X, KOffice, Kate ...
    are those worth and/or fast?

    Thanks, and sorry for the list of questions but I guess is better than 5 Theads...

    ;)
     
  2. &RU macrumors member

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2004
    #2
    what not to do with vpc.

    I am afraid I cannot answer all of your questions, but... I have a 1Ghz machine with 1Gig of RAM. So far, I would say do not get VPC and XP to run AutoCAD. It will be completely unusable. VPC and 2000 might be a better option. As for the Linux apps, they may have been ported to OSX already -- check OpenDarwin or any one of those organizations working on ports.
     
  3. Westside guy macrumors 601

    Westside guy

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2003
    Location:
    The soggy side of the Pacific NW
    #3
    Short answer: Yes they are acceptably fast.

    Longer answer:

    I came over to OS X from Linux, so there are some Gnome apps I still prefer to use. The easiest way to run Gnome or KDE apps is by installing Fink.

    The downside, if you want to call it that, is the "stable" tree of Fink still has the Gnome 1 apps. If you want to run Gnome 2 apps, you'll need to use the "unstable" tree. It's not really a problem, and I personally use it, but it's not the default. But as is the case with cutting edge CVS-type software, sometimes things break and/or don't build correctly. In those cases you just swear under your breath and move on. ;)

    There are instructions on the Fink Website explaining how to switch to Fink unstable.
     
  4. AmigoMac thread starter macrumors 68020

    AmigoMac

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2003
    Location:
    l'Allemagne
    #4
    Thx, Eahs, I've heard, XP on VPC is crappy, have to see, what about win 98? any idea? About KDE and company, as a "Newbie" I want help about installing them.
     
  5. gbojim macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2002
    #5
    2 - Unless you are just trying to learn the basics of Acad, do not even dream of running it under VPC. It installs. It loads. That's the best I can say about it.

    4 - My experience is Win2k runs well under VPC.
     
  6. AmigoMac thread starter macrumors 68020

    AmigoMac

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2003
    Location:
    l'Allemagne
    #6
    OK!

    Actually, it's not for the basics of Acad, is for small designs I would like to check when I'm outside of work... it means I have to forget that idea :( , I will... I will check W2K though
     
  7. gbojim macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2002
    #7
    If it is for genuinely small designs and you are just looking - that might work for you. In this case, another option is having the drawings sent to you as dxf files and importing those into a Mac app.
     
  8. &RU macrumors member

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2004
    #8
    Weeeeee!

    You can try '98, but I can't speak to it personally -- anyone else? As for linux apps your other option is to install a PPC version like YellowDog. I haven't tried it on a Mac, but you should be able to dual boot between OSX and linux. That would probably require far less hacking, and allow you to use the lattest versions of the software you want.
     
  9. zamyatin macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2003
    Location:
    NYC
    #9
    VectorWorks is a very good Mac-native CAD application, which can read and write the export formats used by AutoCAD. Consider VectorWorks, as it is far less expensive than AutoCAD anyway, and I would not be surprised if you begin to prefer it over AutoCAD after a few months. (See, the funny thing about software monopolies and near-monopolies is that they rarely retain customers because of their product's quality, but rather because of the concern over potential incompatibilities.)

    VectorWorks is made by Nemetschek: http://www.nemetschek.net/

    And, a great CAD forum for Mac users: http://architosh.com/
     

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