LaCie's External Drive Lineup Gains New 5TB Drives From Seagate

Discussion in 'Mac Blog Discussion' started by MacRumors, Feb 20, 2014.

  1. macrumors bot

    MacRumors

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    #1
    [​IMG]


    LaCie has launched several new products with Seagate's new 5TB drives, including a new Thunderbolt 5-bay RAID array that puts up to 25 terabytes of storage in one 5-bay unit. LaCie's is using Seagate's new drives featuring 'Shingled Magnetic Recording' technology to push the physical boundaries of magnetic storage.

    The new drives are also available in LaCie's d2 Quadra for $350 and the d2 USB3.0 Thunderbolt for $450.
    [​IMG]
    LaCie says their new RAID is the largest 5-bay storage product on the market, sporting speeds up to 785MB/s. The RAID is available in three configurations, 10TB, 20TB, and 25TB, for $1000, $2000, and $2500 respectively -- Thunderbolt cable included -- from LaCie's website or the Apple Online Store, with the 5TB d2 available for $450 and the 5TB Quadra for $350.

    Article Link: LaCie's External Drive Lineup Gains New 5TB Drives From Seagate
     
  2. macrumors 65816

    SPNarwhal

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2009
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    illinois
    #2
    I wonder why they chose Seagate to partner up with.
    I consider Lacie to be the highest quality of product, and Seagate to be one of the lowest, so that's a weird mixture.
     
  3. macrumors regular

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    #3
    Seagate bought Lacie - May 2012.
     
  4. macrumors 6502a

    dannys1

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    UK
    #4
    Id rather fork out for a Drobo 5D and fill it full of WD Red 4tb drives to be honest.
     
  5. macrumors 6502

    Joined:
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    Charlotte, NC
    #5
    Maybe I'm just lucky, but I've always bought Seagate HDD and SSD and only had 1 catastrophic failure and maybe 2 DOA. That's out of about 2,200
     
  6. macrumors newbie

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    #6
  7. macrumors 6502

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    #7
    Funny I have 4 or 5 seagate drives with no raid configuration and they're all several years old or older with zero issues.
     
  8. macrumors newbie

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    Jul 6, 2013
    #8
    Disappointment...

    "NEW" 5TB Drives but not support Thunderbolt 2.
     
  9. macrumors 68000

    iMcLovin

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2009
    #9
    This is all fine and dandy, but it seems they all are competing on speed and size and looks. But not a single one tries to make them completely silent. it´s really annoying. Both the current new iMac and the Mac Pro makes pretty much no sound, but it doesnt matter when you need an external storage which is making more noise than the computer.

    I´ve bought several Lacie products they are all very noisy, except for the SSD Little big disk Im sure, but that just becomes too small and expensive again.

    I wish one of these companies would manage to make a hdd, which could be in a big enough box to room a decent sized silent fan, like computers does....shouldn´t be too difficult. I would be willing to pay a good price for that.
     
  10. toke lahti, Feb 20, 2014
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2014

    macrumors 65816

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    #10
    Maybe LaCie just don't like when with TB2, the GPU steals all bandwidth from DAS?

    Btw, why hasn't any company yet slapped HGST's 6TB drives to their "storage product"?
     
  11. macrumors G3

    Joined:
    May 10, 2004
    #11
    I'm sorry, but I'm not interested in shingled 5TB drives from Seagate, when there are non-shingled air-filled 5TB drives from Toshiba, and non-shingled helium-filled 6TB drives from HGST.
     
  12. macrumors 6502

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    #12
    pricey...

    [​IMG]
     
  13. macrumors newbie

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    #13
    Seagate quality

    Seagate is the leader in write-only storage.
     
  14. macrumors 6502a

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    #14
    Just curious: why over 2,000 drives?
     
  15. macrumors regular

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    HKG
    #15
    Well, as an admin. I can say the brand is not the factor that determines reliability. We have Seagate, WD and Hitachi deployed in various configurations. They all have similar failure rate.

    It's a game of luck, whether you got your drive from a defective batch.

    We have zero complaints for all 3 brands, they all have great customer services and replacement policies.
     
  16. macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2008
    #16
    Backblaze shows some other numbers for that. In fact, Seagate seem to be much more unreliable than for example Hitachi. All drives die, it's just a question of when.

    http://blog.backblaze.com/2014/01/21/what-hard-drive-should-i-buy/
     
  17. macrumors G3

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    #17
  18. doitdada, Feb 20, 2014
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2014

    macrumors member

    doitdada

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    #18
    Lacie Thunderbolt review

    I put my trust to Thunderbolt to get rid of cable salad. I bought a Thunderbolt dock from Belkin along with a LaCie 2big Thunderbolt with 8TB capacity which made way too much noise.

    Well, the noise was just a sign of warning. You may bad mouth the Seagate drives, but they are really good. Put them into my Hackintosh to check them for error, but no, they made noise, but they are superfast and reliable. I figured out that the Lacie enclosure is not only unbalanced and feels cheap when you swap disk, but the biggest problem happens when you daisy chain them into your an external monitor. Flickering, distortions and artifacts.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vnOa1HGjiRw

    There also is a problem with wake from hibernation, you will have to unplug the disk, then plug it in again to get them to mount.

    Gave them seven months, but I was so tired of trying to fix a problem that never seemed to get solved. Forum posts and comments will confirm the issues.

    Avoid at all costs.
     
  19. macrumors 603

    scaredpoet

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    #19
  20. macrumors G3

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    #20
  21. jimthing, Feb 20, 2014
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2014

    macrumors 6502

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    Location:
    London, UK
    #21
    True, but you're unlikely to see one given the past history of storage.
    So the way most deal with this now, is to buy an OPTICAL Thunderbolt cable. While they come in lengths of up to 100m (330ft) which are very expensive, you can still mitigate the problem using a more affordable 10m one and putting the storage in a cupboard or suchlike. If you're buying a reasonably high-priced (self-powered – as optical cables don't carry power like the shorter copper ones) storage device or two (or more), then the cost of such a cable while not cheap isn't too bad, as it solves the problem and you can then buy whatever storage unit you want.

    I did this with 2x Pegasus R6's & an 8TB WD Thunderbolt, using a $300 "Optical Cable by Corning" (the cable is future-proofed as they work with TBolt 1 & 2 as well!) and then just daisy-chaining using cheap copper Tbolt ones:
    http://www.corning.com/CableSystems/OpticalCablesbyCorning/products/thunderbolt.aspx

    UK peeps: these are not distributed in the UK until August 2014, but I have seen them on Ebay for £500 (yep, pricey, but worth it if needed).
     
  22. macrumors 65816

    SPNarwhal

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2009
    Location:
    illinois
    #22
    They do not have similar failure rates..

    http://www.pcworld.com/article/2089...eals-the-most-reliable-hard-drive-makers.html
     
  23. macrumors G3

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  24. macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2011
    Location:
    London, UK
    #24
    Can we drop the "this brand is better than that brand" as it gets most people absolutely nowhere!
    Most drives come with 3-5yr WARRANTY, so they can be replaced for free by the manufacturer, and more importantly RAID is not backup, so regardless of drive fails, you should have two (or more) completely separate storage units in case of catastrophic failure of the RAID itself.

    This tit-for-tat debate is getting seriously boring and irrelevant. :rolleyes:
     
  25. macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2008
    #25
    Exactly. This is a miss by most people.
     

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