laptop and wireless

Discussion in 'Mac Basics and Help' started by Cindy, Jul 10, 2005.

  1. Cindy macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2003
    #1
    This might be somewhat of a repeat from the older post about wireless internet but my setup is a bit different so..... I just bought a used Lombard G3 laptop. I haven't received it yet but it's basically just going to be my backup and a computer I can with me to work etc. to check email.
    I'm thinking about having it wireless set up'd. My eMac at home is dial up.
    I'm completely clueless about wireless! So please explain in ABC terms ;)
    Now if I was going to get a PCMICA wireless card, how would this whole thing work?
    How do I word this..... It won't work with just the card alone right? I still need an ISP server that will give wireless service such as AOL, etc.? Right?
    My current ISP only offers in state numbers and dial up and cable only. Where I live, there is no cable service.
    A few friends here have switched over to a wireless company. It just costs more money.
    Before I start calling other ISP companies, I would like to know what I'm talking about.
    Cindy
     
  2. alex_ant macrumors 68020

    alex_ant

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2002
    Location:
    All up in your bidness
    #2
    There are two different types of wireless you're talking about:

    1) 802.11b or 802.11g (also known as Wi-Fi or AirPort) wireless which is used for networking nearby computers together
    2) Cellular wireless which is used for accessing the internet from a computer that has either a special PCMCIA card, or a cell phone connected to it

    They are completely different. The range of 802.11 is a few hundred feet at best. It's basically a substitute for having to be tied to a computer network cable. Cellular, well you know what that is, it's just like talking on a cell phone except instead of you talking, your computer is exchanging data.

    With cellular you need to subscribe to service with a provider like Sprint or Verizon or Cingular or whoever, and it's very expensive, but you can get internet access wherever you have coverage.

    With 802.11, you need a PCMCIA card for the Powerbook and you also need some other 802.11 device on your network that can serve as a wireless access point, such as a wireless router or the Airport card in your eMac (if it has one). So for example, you would dial into the internet on your eMac, turn on internet sharing by going to System Preferences --> Sharing --> Internet and clicking the button, and then you would have access to the internet through both the eMac and the PowerBook. You would be able to use the internet on the PowerBook within a range of a couple hundred feet, but if your dial-up connection happened to hang up or something, or if you wanted to disconnect, you would have to walk back to the eMac to dial back in. (Unless you have the technical aptitude to use VNC or want to spend hundreds of $$ on Apple Remote Desktop software to control your eMac from your PowerBook)

    Hope this helps!
     
  3. crachoar macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2004
    Location:
    Ohio
    #3
    ABC terms got ya...

    'Numbers numbers numbers, math math math'...

    Ok, here's what you do.

    If you're on dial-up? You stop. You get cable or DSL.

    That's A.

    So what's B?

    You get your wireless router, and hook it up to your DSL / Cable modem. It doesn't have to be Apple brand - infact, I wouldn't suggest Apple's WIFI options - as they are marginally overpriced.

    I suggest Microsoft (Oh noes!), Linksys or Belkin. They can be had for $0-$50, depending on rebates / deals. You can usually find one for $30.

    So, you want to get an 802.11G (new) router (54mbps) - they are backwards compatible with 802.11B (old), and if you ever upgrade your computers / cards - they'll be able to take advantage of the faster speeds.

    Your ISP has nothing to do with this wireless setup. Do it on your own - save a ton of cash.

    Just remember to read your wireless router manual, so you can config the admin page. You're going to want to use a WEP key of some sort so that your connection isn't open to your neighbors and those pesky 'h4x0rz'.

    If you want, you can forward ports for certain applications - block all computers except for the MAC addresses that you approve - all kinds of neat, anal-retentive safety features.

    Plug in your PCMICA card - connect to the wireless network. Works? Cool.

    So that's B. What's C?

    Enjoy your wirless connection (up to 80-100ft. - without external antennae).
     
  4. FadeToBlack macrumors 68000

    FadeToBlack

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2005
    Location:
    Accoville, WV
    #4
    Ok, I also have a Lombard and have a question.

    I'm running 8.6 on my Lombard and I was wondering if I buy a wireless card and router for it, will it come with a driver for 8.6?

    Also, do you guys have any recommendations?
     
  5. 7on macrumors 601

    7on

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2003
    Location:
    Dress Rosa
    #5
    buy Tiger for that Lombard, it'll support it.

    Then all you'd need is a PCMCIA wireless card with the Broadcom chipset. OSX is compatible with all Broadcom chipset wireless cards natively.

    Since you have an eMac - I suggest a wireless router and share your dialup to your ethernet and hook up the wireless router to the ethernet. Alternatively you could search eBay for the Apple basestation with a 56k modem builtin it.
     
  6. FadeToBlack macrumors 68000

    FadeToBlack

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2005
    Location:
    Accoville, WV
    #6
    My Lombard doesn't have a DVD ROM, so I'm looking at purchasing a copy of Jaguar on eBay.

    I'm on cable, BTW.
     
  7. ITASOR macrumors 601

    ITASOR

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2005
    Location:
    Oneida, NY
    #7
    NO! Get Panther. Panther introduced Exposé and ran MUCH faster than Jaguar, especially on old hardware like the G3 Lombard and up. :)
     
  8. FadeToBlack macrumors 68000

    FadeToBlack

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2005
    Location:
    Accoville, WV
    #8
    Yeah, Panther is what came on my eMac. I just figured Jaguar would be much cheaper. I'll look around some more on eBay and see what I can find.

    EDIT: It looks to be going at around the same price as Jaguar, so I'll just go ahead and pick up a copy of Panther.
     
  9. sacear macrumors 6502

    sacear

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2005
    #9
    Re: laptop and wireless

    Cindy,

    The internet signal usually comes into the house from a wire source, such as cable or DSL (dial-up will work, just not as well), and does not come wireless from the ISP (altho' there is satellite internet). The wire signal coming into the house is then converted into wireless and transmitted with a gateway box or a router.

    To receive that wireless signal your computer needs a wireless receiver, a wireless card. The Lombard does not have an Apple Airport Wireless Card slot, so it requires an Apple Airport compatible PCMCIA Cardbus wireless card that plugs into the PCMCIA Cardbus slot on the left side of the Lombard. Here is one from Belkin, and a couple from Buffalo here and here.

    My advice is to get the fastest most reliable internet service you can in your area. Some ISPs provide a gateway box that has a wireless transmitter built-in when you sign-up for their service.
     
  10. sacear macrumors 6502

    sacear

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2005
    #10
    No, OS 8.6 was before Apple wireless. I think Apple wireless requires at least OS 9.

    Tiger does not support the Lombard. The Lombard does not have Firewire and therefore is not supported by Tiger. I recommend Panther (Mac OS X 10.3), it is better than Jaguar.
     
  11. FadeToBlack macrumors 68000

    FadeToBlack

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2005
    Location:
    Accoville, WV
    #11
    I'm getting Panther from eBay. I'm just waiting on a particular auction to get closer to closing, then I'll place my bid and hopefully win it.
     
  12. ftaok macrumors 601

    ftaok

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2002
    Location:
    East Coast
    #12
    FtoB,

    Check out XPostFacto. It's an application/utility/firmware updater that allows older Macs to use OS X. There may be a way to get the Lombard to run Tiger. Not sure if it's worth it to run Tiger on a Lombard, but it may be possible.
     
  13. FadeToBlack macrumors 68000

    FadeToBlack

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2005
    Location:
    Accoville, WV
    #13
    According to Apple's website, it isn't necessary to update the Firmware on a Lombard to run OS X.
     
  14. ftaok macrumors 601

    ftaok

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2002
    Location:
    East Coast
    #14
    OK, I wasn't really sure. I was reading what sacear posted about the Lombard not being able to run Tiger. I took that at face value (and it still may be the case).

    Just wanted to give you an option in case Tiger doesn't work on a Lombard.
     
  15. Cindy thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2003
    #15
    Thanks for all the great info. Would any of this change with a satellite hookup system? My neighbor has a satellite hookup from a local company.
    But I would need to check to see if the company offers out of state numbers.
    Cindy
     
  16. Ugg macrumors 68000

    Ugg

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2003
    Location:
    Penryn
    #16
    No, it would all be the same. The satellite will connect to a box in your house similar to cable or DSL.
     
  17. sacear macrumors 6502

    sacear

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2005
    #17
    Yes, the Lombard can run OS X (no firmware upgrade needed), up to and including Panther (10.3). Tiger (10.4) however is officially supported only on Firewire machines. The Lombard does not have Firewire. I think the Pismo from 2000 is the oldest model with Firewire.

    Xpostfacto is an option, but not for recent switchers. It tends to take away the simple and easy to use factor of Mac OS X. Plus Tiger requires more CPU and especially GPU power than the Lombard offers. It might work, but it won't be a pleasant experience. Panther works great on a Lombard and is still relatively fast.

    Exactly as Ugg said. The internet signal is transmitted from a satellite to a receiver at your home, instead of via cable or DSL. Once the signal hits the satellite receiver it is taken by a wire into the house, where the rest of the process is exactly the same.

    I am confused what you mean by "if the company offers out of state numbers?" With "high-speed" or "broadband" internet there is no phone number to dial, as with "dial-up." Instead the link is constant.

    Is the ISP out-of-state? Is your neighbor's satellite for TV, internet, or both?
     
  18. rainman::|:| macrumors 603

    rainman::|:|

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2002
    Location:
    iowa
    #18
    Just want to point out that systems going back to 7.6 (possibly earlier) can recognize and use 802.11b cards, albeit not easily (there's a Lucent driver that helps I think). But Panther is definitely your best bet, much faster than Jaguar, but most of the killer features.
     
  19. pubwvj macrumors 68000

    pubwvj

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2004
    Location:
    Mountains of Vermont
    #19
    I have a Belkin 54MB Wi-Fi g/b PCMCIA card in my wife's PowerBook Lombard and it works without a hitch connecting to our Airport (original) and Airport Express. Her Ethernet port is fried so this was the fix.
     
  20. ftaok macrumors 601

    ftaok

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2002
    Location:
    East Coast
    #20
    I think Cindy asked in a previous post about ISP's offering dial-up numbers for the times that you're away from home and need to connect via dial-up. I know several DSL vendors offer dial-up numbers. Not sure about sat providers.
     

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