large Mysql Database

Discussion in 'Distributed Computing' started by stoneage, Jan 2, 2007.

  1. stoneage macrumors regular

    stoneage

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2002
    Location:
    Directly above the center of the Earth.
    #1
    I currently have my own forum (phpbb) that I run on my website. I recently just got a new hosting provider and I'd like to transfer my forum from my older provider to the new one.

    The problem I run into is that because my database is about 25 megs in size I have to find some way to break it down into smaller chunks because they will not allow me to upload the file in any larger than two mb chunks.

    Anyone out there have any experience with this that they might be able to offer some advice?
     
  2. tyr2 macrumors 6502a

    tyr2

    Joined:
    May 6, 2006
    Location:
    Leeds, UK
    #2
    That's insanely small. Don't take this the wrong way but I'd consider a different hosting provider.

    Are you sure it's 2Mb and not 2Gb?
     
  3. bankshot macrumors 65816

    bankshot

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2003
    Location:
    Southern California
    #3
    Agree with tyr2, a 2 MB limit is insanely small.

    If you have access to the unix command line on both ends (use Terminal on the Mac), you can use the 'split' and 'cat' utilities to split up the file. For example, before transferring, you would do:

    Code:
    split -b 2m file_name
    This creates 2-MB files with names 'xaa', 'xab', 'xac', and so on. Transfer them to the host, and then on the host do:

    Code:
    cat x?? > file_name
    Of course, if your host is really this limiting on upload sizes, I have a feeling that they don't give you access to the unix command line, and thus this method will not work.
     
  4. seanf macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2006
    Location:
    UK
    #4
    Is this using their Control Panel? If so, do you have shell and FTP access to the server?

    With reference o your thread title: 25MB is really quite a small amount of data, for comparison I regularly work with databases that are several hundred gigabytes in size.

    Sean :)
     

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