LCD display resolution

Discussion in 'Mac Accessories' started by mac000, Dec 27, 2006.

  1. mac000 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2005
    #1
    My gateway 22" LCD has a max resolution of 1680x1050. I also noticed today a lot of 20" LCD's have a max resolution of 1680x1050. What gives? My screen should be able to handle a higher resolution shouldn't it? Is there any tip/trick someone could give me to accomplish this?

    I"m just a little "eh" because now my 22" is really more just like a 20"...
     
  2. tobefirst macrumors 68040

    tobefirst

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2005
    Location:
    St. Louis, MO
    #2
    There's no way to "trick" or otherwise adjust a monitor into thinking it has more pixels than it actually has. You have no more real estate on your 22" than someone who has a 20" does. Sorry to disappoint. It's still a great monitor, though.
     
  3. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2004
    Location:
    Grand Rapids, MI, USA
    #3
    I have a tip. Buy a different LCD.

    If you understood how LCDs work, then you would realize that shaking your fist at your LCD and demanding it display a better resolution for you is rather like shaking your fist at your car and demanding that it run on diet soda.
     
  4. mac000 thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2005
    #4
    what about the powerbook macbook pro resolution adjustment?
     
  5. balamw Moderator

    balamw

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2005
    Location:
    New England
    #5
    The only way to increase the resolution in a PowerBook is to replace the LCD panel itself, which some have done using the top half or a MacBook Pro. This ain't cheap or for the faint of heart. Much easier to buy a higher res. monitor like the Dell 24" if you need the res.

    Resolution and size aren't tied as you seem to think, as many larger LCDs have even less resolution than your 22" (e.g. my 40" HDTB with 1360x768).

    B
     
  6. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2004
    Location:
    Grand Rapids, MI, USA
    #6
    Mmmm, okay, let me explain my earlier snide comment.

    A CRT works by spraying a screen with an electron beam gun. The gun is moved around by EM fields, basically. The screen itself doesn't really have a fundamental resolution; it can more or less display as high a resolution as you can get -- which is limited by how accurately you can control the electron beam.

    An LCD doesn't work anything like this at all. An LCD has a fixed grid of pixels that are basically like colored glass that can change color. They can change from opaque to transparent, and they handle in three colors so that you can come up with whatever color you want. Then you pass white light through the grid and, just like a projector, you see the pixels that are transparent as light and the pixels that are opaque as dark.

    BUT, the resolution of the grid is always the same. Think of it like a checkerboard. You can only put the pieces in the squares. There's nowhere else to put the pieces. And there are only so many squares.

    You can *reduce* the resolution, as you do on your Powerbook, and it will attempt to simulate the lower resolution on your screen (so you can make 800x600 on a powerbook). The screen still has the same number of pixels, but it interpolates the image onto them.

    But you can never go higher than the actual native resolution. This is no less true of the Powerbook than your Gateway or of any other LCD. Every single LCD works this way.
     

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