Learning Norwegian, any advice?

Discussion in 'Community' started by Macaddicttt, Jun 9, 2005.

  1. Macaddicttt macrumors 6502a

    Macaddicttt

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2004
    Location:
    San Diego, CA
    #1
    I'm currently learning Norwegian on account of the fact that my girlfriend is Norwegian (don't worry, she speaks English just fine, if not better than Norwegian), and I was wondering if anyone else here has ever attempted this. So far it seems like a pretty easy language for an English-speaker like me. But does anyone know any good books, etc. that I should have? I have this book called "Teach Yourself Norwegian" which is pretty good so far (I'm about a third of the way through it after two weeks or so), and I plan on buying a dictionary and "Norwegian Verbs and Essentials of Grammar."

    Right now, this is how I'm doing it. I go through the dialogues in the book with my girlfriend, with her correcting my pronunciation, but I read the grammar bits and study vocab on my own, occasionally getting pronunciation help and the native-speaker perspective from my girlfriend.

    I guess I want to have more exposure to the language (i.e. hearing, speaking, etc.) but I'm not sure how to go about it. My girlfriend isn't around much right now and even when she is, she isn't a teacher so it's hard to know how to go about it. Anyone have any tips? Any help would be very appreciated.
     
  2. dubbz macrumors 68020

    dubbz

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2003
    Location:
    Alta, Norway
    #2
    If you want to listen to Norwegian you could try the net radio of NRK. Just select the dropdown list that says "NRK NETTRADIO" and choose one of the channels, and a window should pop up. Some of them plays mostly music, while one, NRK Sámi Radio, doesn't use norwegian at all (afaik).

    Looks like a mess in Safari and Camino, but it should play just fine.
     
  3. mcadam macrumors 6502a

    mcadam

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2004
    Location:
    københavn
    #3
    Sounds like you've allready started off well. And as soon as you can you should start reading some easy litterature as well - best way to improve vocabulary. Now, to really learn a language there's no way around going to the country where it's spoken. In your situation I would also assume that the most important thing is to speak and understand it when spoken - not knowing everything about the grammar. So, off to Norway you go, for at least a couple of months (just remember to bring your own food ;)).

    A
     
  4. Macaddicttt thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Macaddicttt

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2004
    Location:
    San Diego, CA
    #4
    Well, I'll definitely be in Norway quite a bit, but unfortunately not all in a row with school and all. I'll just be visiting for a few weeks at a time. I am going to Norway this summer for three and a half weeks, so that's a good start, I guess.
     
  5. Macaddicttt thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Macaddicttt

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2004
    Location:
    San Diego, CA
    #5
    I gave that a look and I listened to it a bit. I'll certainly be looking forward to the day when I can understand what is being said, but at least until then, I'll be a good way to expose myself to more Norwegian. Thanks for the link.
     
  6. Mitthrawnuruodo Moderator emeritus

    Mitthrawnuruodo

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    Mar 10, 2004
    Location:
    Bergen, Norway
  7. Bartholomew macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2004
    #7
    Me, I've been trying to get a head start learning some Swedish before I (likely) go there next year for university. As I'm sure you're aware, classes for Scandinavian languages aren't particularly common in the U.S., so we've got to just do whatever we can to work on it.

    I linger around some message boards where Swedish is spoken to get practice reading it, and look up words I don't know in a dictionary. Watching films and listening to songs with Swedish lyrics definitely helps a bit too, with pronunciation but also vocabulary and grammar. I also like checking out Swedish news sites and looking up unfamiliar words. Perhaps these sorts of things could help you, too?
     
  8. Macaddicttt thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Macaddicttt

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2004
    Location:
    San Diego, CA
    #8
    Yeah, those sound like good ideas. I'll give them a try. For me there are two really hard parts: understanding someone speaking Norwegian and speaking Norwegian myself correctly. The vocabulary and grammar is easy, it just takes time. And reading and writing just goes along naturally from vocabulary and grammar. But Norwegian vowels are so complicated. I don't know about Swedish, but Norwegian has nine vowels (a, e, i, o, u, y, å, ø, and æ) and they can be both long and short. That's 18 vowel sounds! Then add in diphthongs. How many does English have? 10? Maybe less? Plus vowels aren't completely consistent in which sound they make. Some e's are pronounced as æ's for example. In school I'm taking Italian. Vowels are so much easier. Five vowels and they each only have one sound. But to be fair, there are diphthongs.
     
  9. Bartholomew macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2004
    #9
    Yeah, Swedish vowels are the same, but with ö and ä in place of ø and æ. The pronunciation throws me off a bit too, but that's especially where hearing it is helpful. I expect that your girlfriend and trips to Norway will help in this regard.

    Good luck with it.
     

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