linksys security

Discussion in 'Macintosh Computers' started by rideahyperLite, Dec 23, 2003.

  1. rideahyperLite macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2003
    #1
    ok maybe im an idiot but i just installed my linksys wireless router and it works fine. the problem is that i dont know to setup a password for the network. i am living in a condo-like setup so others can easily jump on my network if they wanted to. i tried everything and i have absolutely no idea how to setup the password. what kind of protection do i need and what do i have to do to set it up. i read something about turning off ssid broadcasting? how do i do this? thanks.
     
  2. MoparShaha macrumors 68000

    MoparShaha

    Joined:
    May 15, 2003
    Location:
    San Francisco
    #2
    You need to run the Linksys Setup Utility that came on the CD. Unfortunately, this program only runs on Windows, so you need a PC to set it up on. If you have access to a PC, just take the router with you, plug it in through ethernet, and set it up. Then you can take it back home and use it.
     
  3. rideahyperLite thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2003
    #3
    damn, i am at my vacation house and i dont have a pc here. i really dont want to have to take the router back home with me to set up. is there any other way to do this with a mac? thanks
     
  4. MoparShaha macrumors 68000

    MoparShaha

    Joined:
    May 15, 2003
    Location:
    San Francisco
    #4
    One last thing you could try is typing this into your web browser: 192.168.0.1 or 192.168.1.1 -I don't remember which one, try both. Hopefully you'll get a prompt for a password. Leave the username blank, and type "admin" for the password. That might work. Good luck.
     
  5. Versello macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2003
    #5
    Like Mopar said, type http://192.168.1.1 in your browser to access your router's web admin interface. Pass admin by default. You'll definately want to set a password for it.

    For wireless security, click on "Wireless security" and enable WEP. You'll have to generate a key of alphanumeric digits. Once your router is set with wireless security, use that same combination of alphanumeric digits and input them into your Mac's wireless settings.
     
  6. rideahyperLite thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2003
    #6
    thanks, that helped a lot. but is there any way that i can set a password that is not just a bunch of random letters and numbers. i have a lot of people that will frequently use the network and i want an easy password for them to be able to remember. thanks
     
  7. Versello macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2003
    #7
    Technically you can make the password a word of some sort for WEP using 64-bit ASCII (instead of Hex) encryption, but that leaves your network more vulnerable to attacks compared to 128-bit. I don't think LinkSys supports this option (at least mine doesn't).

    But, if you could use another form of encryption, implemented by newer routers called WPA. WPA uses a pass-phrase which is much more secure than WEP and would be great for your scenario, BUT, not all wireless clients support WPA. An example: my powerbook and Dell notebook both support WPA, but my 'guest' PC doesn't support WPA so I'm forced into using WEP.

    Depending on the amount of people that use your network, setting up a WEP key in your wireless clients is usually a 1-shot deal. Once it's set, they won't have to set it ever again unless you change it. But if you really have a lot of people (like, 25-50+) then you might want to try an alternative...
     
  8. RiseAgainst macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2003
    #8
    You might want to try this...

    If you want some good security.

    Disable the SSID broadcast and enable MAC filtering. This will only let specified computers join the netowork.

    Also, you should change the IP to the router. Since all linksys rounters have a 192.168.1.1 IP by default, all someone has to do is open their laptop and find your network. (if broadcasted). If they do connect they will be able to screw with your settings.
     
  9. Versello macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2003
    #9
    Re: You might want to try this...

    All the people that use his network would have to give him their MAC addresses so he can add it into the router's wireless allow listing... which is limited to 50 I believe. I think he just wants an easy route for decent security with easy access for people (not outsiders, of course).

    Using MAC filtering solely will still present the problem of unencypted packets. Even WEP can be broken easily but...

    Changing the IP address of the router is somewhat irrelevant as well. If the person is not authorized to use the wireless network (by say, MAC filtering), they wouldn't be able to access the router in the first place. If they did get on the network, the person can just look at the gateway address provided by DHCP, assuming DHCP is enabled... if DHCP is disabled, well, sure it'd be good security but then it'd be more of a hassle in this scenario (lots of people using the network).
     
  10. RiseAgainst macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2003
    #10
    Versello:

    Yes you are correct. The MAC filtering idea would be a hassle if there were lots of people to join the network. However, if its its his computers then its not bad at all. And to add a friends computer is not really a hassle.

    Also, not broadcasting the SSID, while not encrypting the packets like you mentioned, is still a good first line of defense from having you network being discovered by passerbys.
     
  11. rideahyperLite thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2003
    #11
    ok thats great. thanks guys that helped a lot.
     

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