Linux on my new iBook?

Discussion in 'General Mac Discussion' started by Mr. Monsieur, May 24, 2004.

  1. macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2004
    #1
    So...I have my wonderful new iBook and am getting acquainted with OSX Panther...it's all fantastic...now, however, I need to get some serious software to get my work done. Before I go further, let me plainly state that I am CLUELESS as regards computers...this is, in fact, my first computer. That said, I don't have $2000 dollars to spend on Adobe, etc. products to do the applications I need to do. So...I was wondering if it would be possible to install some form of Linux, as a second OS on my iBook, so as to use GIMP, Open Office, etc. Essentially, I would work in Linux and play in Panther. If this is possible, how would I go about doing it and what would be the most user-(and newbie-)friendly version of UNIX (I mention Linux, because I found some threads here mentioning that Linux Fedora Core and Red Hat are perhaps the easiest OSs to get started on....) Am I being foolish to attempt this, not having had any background in programming, etc.? :confused: Finally, any thoughts as to where to go to buy/download this stuff? Oh, and does anyone know of any serious open source desktop publishing app.s? Thanks and THANKS!
     
  2. Moderator emeritus

    grapes911

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2003
    Location:
    Citizens Bank Park
    #2
    If you stick to something like redhat, its put in the disk and install. You answer some config questions, but you don't need to look at any code. You'll be fine.
     
  3. macrumors 65816

    abhishekit

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2003
    Location:
    akron , ohio
    #3
    if you are just going to linux for the apps you mentioned, there is no real need. a lot of open source apps are being ported for mac. macgimp is available, and open office also comes for mac..infact just install fink , you wd get many many apps of linux..

    cheers
     
  4. 7on
    macrumors 601

    7on

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2003
    Location:
    Dress Rosa
  5. thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2004
    #5
    How about Scribus?

    That's good to know! I forgot to mention that I'm going to need to run Scribus as well, for desktop publishing. From what I can tell from their site, Scribus , it only works on UNIX. Does anyone know of any other Open Source app.s for DP that might work in OSX?
     
  6. macrumors 65816

    abhishekit

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2003
    Location:
    akron , ohio
    #6
    you can get scribus too, thru fink. install fink , scribus is available
    other alternative is quark express, though it wont be cheap.

    cheers
     
  7. macrumors G4

    wrldwzrd89

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2003
    Location:
    Solon, OH
    #7
    Make sure you have Apple's X11 installed if you want to run graphical UNIX applications. Open Office.org is a good example of such an application (which I have used).
     
  8. macrumors 68020

    Horrortaxi

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2003
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    #8
    Do your homework. GIMP and OpenOffice both run in OS X. Chances are that whatever you need to run will also run in OS X. If it needs Unix, you've got it.

    By the way, you said something interesting. You're a newbie, but you want to do all your serious "work" in Linux and "play" in OS X. I've never heard anybody say that. Why'd you get a Mac?
     
  9. thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2004
    #9
    All right...Is it not automatically downloaded through Fink, though?


    I know that OS X is based on Unix...but would I have to reboot in some alternative fashion to use it as an OS, should the need arise? If so, how is this done?

    Macs are beautiful...:)...aside from the obvious, however, initially I thought I'd use Adobe, Microsoft, Macromedia, etc. products in OS X, but I wasn't being realistic-it would simply cost too much. I figure, as I'm starting out I might as well put in the extra time to learn Unix-based software and then enjoy not having to pay for upgrades, etc. My thought as regards the Mac was that its iLife software is so well-designed and easy to use, that if forced to run Linux (or something Unix-based), I would use the Mac software for 'play' and the Unix software for 'work.' Does that make sense? As it stands, though, now that I've learned about Fink, there really doesn't seem to be a need to delve into the Unix underworld...much as it intrigues me, I'm more of a literary type than a programmer.
     
  10. macrumors G4

    wrldwzrd89

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2003
    Location:
    Solon, OH
    #10
    Are you referring to Apple's X11 or Open Office.org? Apple's X11 is part of the Mac OS X 10.3 "Panther" install options. Open Office.org can be downloaded separately. I've never used Fink, so I don't know whether OOO is available there.
    Simple - open Terminal (located in your Utilities folder) to access the Unix underpinnings of Mac OS X. There is also a single-user mode in Mac OS X - to access it, hold down Command and S while your Mac is booting. To exit single-user mode, type 'reboot' (without the quotes) and press Return.
    I understand you completely. I happen to have some experience in compiling source code, which you will need to do in order for some Unix applications/utilities to work on Mac OS X. However, there is also quite a bit of Unix software that has already been built for Mac OS X (needs no compilation). I actually don't use the Unix side of Mac OS X as much as I do the Apple side, but I have enough experience there to be comfortable.
     
  11. macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2004
    #11
    Even though, it sounds like you chose not to go the Linux route, here are a couple links:


    Yellow Dog Linux

    MkLinux
     
  12. macrumors 68020

    Horrortaxi

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2003
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    #12
    Applications > Utilities > Terminal. There you will find a Unix shell. Good stuff. Pretty much anything is possible there. No rebooting needed.

    Unix is useful to know about, but I don't find myself doing too much with the command line. I can get around okay, but everything I need is built into OS X now that OS X has matured. A couple years ago this was not the case.
     
  13. macrumors G4

    wrldwzrd89

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2003
    Location:
    Solon, OH
    #13
    Did you not see my post, or did you intend to add to my reply, but quoted the wrong post?
     
  14. macrumors 68020

    Horrortaxi

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2003
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    #14
    Eh?

    We said about the same thing I guess. Why does it matter?
     
  15. macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2003
    #15
    If you know Linux, then try YellowDog - they will have a new version out in a few months!

    But be prepared for your Wireless Networking, Modem and Sleep to work for now.

    Support for your new system will improve as it gets older!

    http://www.yellowdoglinux.com/products/

    Hope this helps

    doc
     
  16. macrumors 65816

    rueyeet

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2003
    Location:
    MD
    #16
    If you aren't already fairly computer savvy, or willing to dedicate some time and effort to become so, Linux is probably not for you. Installing Linux has gotten very easy, and the basic day-to-day usability is OK, but troubleshooting and other management of the computer is a bit more arcane.

    As long as you've got Apple's X11 client and the fink program installed, you should be able to run most--if not all--Unix software on OS X. There's no need to run Linux.
     
  17. Moderator emeritus

    grapes911

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2003
    Location:
    Citizens Bank Park
    #17
    First, he said he was "clueless." Second, anyone that know linux well would not use YellowDog. It is inferior compaired to some other distros.
     
  18. macrumors G4

    wrldwzrd89

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2003
    Location:
    Solon, OH
    #18
    I guess you're right - I just don't like to see duplicate posts, that's all.
     
  19. macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2004
    #19
    OS X is built on top of unix. You don't need to install another OS to use open source software. You just need to use what is already included by default.

    I suggest you go to freebsd.org and learn about unix somewhat, since OS X is built on a flavor of freebsd.

    It's pretty interesting that you bought the ibook, intending to use it with linux, not knowing that it has that functionality built in.

    Just somewhat amusing is all!
     
  20. macrumors 601

    BornAgainMac

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2004
    Location:
    Florida Resident
    #20
    Apple Menu

    From the Apple menu, you can see a option called "Mac OS X Software...". It's organized very well with a nice screen shot for each program. Like other posts mention, many of the Linux apps you are interested in are available for Mac OS X.

    As a newbe, you won't like Linux.
     

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