linux server <--> OS X filesharing

Discussion in 'macOS' started by shecky, Mar 13, 2007.

  1. shecky Guest

    shecky

    Joined:
    May 24, 2003
    Location:
    Obviously you're not a golfer.
    #1
    i am just about to build a fileserver/network attached storage box for my studio, and i have some questions about the software before i take the leap; mainly about how to set up the NAS to work properly with OS X machines.

    after some research, there are a lot of comments about the stability/reliability of FreeNAS, so i have decided to go to a linux installation, most seem to say Ubuntu is the way to go. now, i have never touched linux, so its all new to me, but i can do my research and figure out what i need to (i hope). the big question that i cannot seem to get a clear answer is what protocol to set up the NAS with. my understanding is that Samba is a windows protocol that OSX can access via SMB, whereas AFP is a mac protocol that would work better? i also hear there is something called netatalk that you can put onto the ubuntu server to make it AFP capable? i am hearing there is some issue with filenames between OSX and the server with SMB.

    basically, i am a bit lost and before i go buy all the stuff to build the box, i want to make sure i know what i am getting into. if anyone can give me a quick primer or point me in an easy to understand direction that would be great!

    me = confused
     
  2. wrldwzrd89 macrumors G5

    wrldwzrd89

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2003
    Location:
    Solon, OH
    #2
    I don't know much about Linux either, having only used Knoppix from a Live CD. However, I am familiar with SMB, and can tell you this:

    Filename problems with SMB are going to occur with any Mac file that has characters in the name Mac OS X allows but Windows does not. These characters are:
    Code:
    " / \ [ ] ; =
    (Note: the colon character ( : ) is forbidden in file names by both Mac OS X and Windows.)
     
  3. jeremy.king macrumors 603

    jeremy.king

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2002
    Location:
    Fuquay Varina, NC
    #3
    I'll bite.

    You seem sold on building a linux box, but is it worth your time and energy to build AND maintain?

    Why not use a mac mini (G4s could be had for $300 or less) with some attached external drives? Granted you won't get RAID 5 without a special enclosure, but you can get RAID 1 from OS X.

    For me, dealing with a platform that I already know is worth it.
     
  4. shecky thread starter Guest

    shecky

    Joined:
    May 24, 2003
    Location:
    Obviously you're not a golfer.
    #4
    ahhh i see. i dont use characters like that anyway, but i still hear that SMB is a bad choice when only macs will be accessing the server.

    now i am looking thru the freeNAS user guide and i see this:

    so freeNAS can use AFP?
     
  5. Guy Incognito macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2006
    #5
  6. shecky thread starter Guest

    shecky

    Joined:
    May 24, 2003
    Location:
    Obviously you're not a golfer.
    #6
    because i have no interest in many externals that cannot be setup as RAID5 or 6. its not an efficient use of hardware or my money.

    my understanding is that once a linux box is set up properly, its pretty much maintenance free.

    windows machines will never access this box, only two macs.
     
  7. jeremy.king macrumors 603

    jeremy.king

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2002
    Location:
    Fuquay Varina, NC
    #7
    don't say you haven't been warned ;)

    Good luck to you...Oh! and I'd just use Samba for the file sharing.
     
  8. shecky thread starter Guest

    shecky

    Joined:
    May 24, 2003
    Location:
    Obviously you're not a golfer.
    #8
    well, its just what i read :) i do not expect it to be nearly that simple. but a guy can dream.

    i keep reading that samba + OSX make for a very sluggish and unstable marriage. apparently file transfers are much slower than on other systems and the only way i want to do this is if it works reasonably quickly.

    after further research, it looks like AFP is indeed built into FreeNAS; maybe thats the way to go since i keep reading over and over how darn easy it is. assuming AFP is the best way to go, i am going to have to continue my research of freeNAS's stability.
     
  9. jeremy.king macrumors 603

    jeremy.king

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2002
    Location:
    Fuquay Varina, NC
    #9
    AFP will be the best in a mac only network. If FreeNAS supports that, go for it. if you can you do both SMB and AFP, that would be best since you never know when a non-mac user will come join your network :)

    Our office uses Samba in a mixed environment (linux, mac, win) and our only bottleneck is the actual network (still 10 and 100 base T) - never encountered any weirdness that I am aware of.
     
  10. HugMnster macrumors member

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2006
    Location:
    Tyler, Tx
    #10
     
  11. shecky thread starter Guest

    shecky

    Joined:
    May 24, 2003
    Location:
    Obviously you're not a golfer.
    #11
    aha! :)

    also, what file systems makes sense between OS X and FreeNAS? says it supports UFS, FAT32 and EXT2/3 and NTFS (i know NTFS is a no-go.)
     
  12. jeremy.king macrumors 603

    jeremy.king

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2002
    Location:
    Fuquay Varina, NC
    #12
    ext3 should be fine. The sharing protocol (AFP) abstracts this.
     
  13. shecky thread starter Guest

    shecky

    Joined:
    May 24, 2003
    Location:
    Obviously you're not a golfer.
    #13
    well, just an update: i got all the parts in and built the NAS and for the 30 seconds i got to play with it last night before finally passing out at 3AM it works great.

    i set it up with just AFP and transfers from my MBP to the NAS via a gigabit switch are supercrazy fast; faster than my FW400 drives to be sure (i do not have any FW800 drives to compare them to.) i will have to look at my stats but it feels like its in the 30-50 MB/sec range, maybe faster.

    the final formatted RAID5 setup of my 3 500GB SATA seagate drives comes to about 870GB of useable space. i am actually debating grabbing another drive now to up that total to around 1.3TB formatted capacity; since FreeNAS does not support expanding the array while keeping data intact. (i would need to move all the data off the NAS, rebuild the array with the 4th drive, then move all the data back on) i think i would rather do it now than do it later.

    thanks for the help!
     
  14. edesignuk Moderator emeritus

    edesignuk

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2002
    Location:
    London, England
  15. shecky thread starter Guest

    shecky

    Joined:
    May 24, 2003
    Location:
    Obviously you're not a golfer.
    #15
    i did read that early in my research and to be honest, the (relative) complexity of Ubuntu to freenas seemed to outweigh its benefits, at least to me: a linux/unix virgin.

    having said that, if i could find an easy, step by step "how to" on installing ubuntu, adding AFP and configuring the RAID5 i would have no problem giving it a go; freenas takes a total of 15 minutes to set up from start to finish so i can always redo it if need be.
     
  16. twoodcc macrumors P6

    twoodcc

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2005
    Location:
    Right side of wrong
    #16
    congrats on getting it to work. i'm curious as to what equipment did you buy?
     
  17. shecky thread starter Guest

    shecky

    Joined:
    May 24, 2003
    Location:
    Obviously you're not a golfer.
    #17
    i ended up with the following:

    Asus M2NPB-VM motherboard (built-in video, and gigabit LAN)
    AMD Sempron 64 3000+ processor (cheapest socket AM2 processor i could find on newegg)
    Corsair 512MB DDR2 RAM
    Cooler Master Centurion 5 case (cheapest relatively decent looking case with a 120mm back fan and an 80mm fan over the drive cage)
    Enermax Noisetaker EG45P 430w power supply
    3 x 500GB Seagate 7200.10 SATA drives

    and a few SATA cables, etc. i already had an old IDE 40GB maxtor drive i used as the boot drive, and an old CDROM i used to install FreeNAS and then pulled back out of the case.

    so with some cables, a gigabit netgear switch, and shipping the grand total was about $800 even.
     
  18. twoodcc macrumors P6

    twoodcc

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2005
    Location:
    Right side of wrong
    #18
    thanks for posting :)
     
  19. rhoydotp macrumors 6502

    rhoydotp

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2006
    #19
    NFS would be the best. You can set your Linux (or Mac) to be NFS server & SMB server as well. Should be easy to setup.
     

Share This Page