Mac game company CEOs discuss piracy

Discussion in 'MacBytes.com News Discussion' started by MacBytes, Jan 26, 2004.

  1. macrumors bot

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    #1
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    Mudbug

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    #2
    ouch. that can't help a bottom line...
     
  3. Moderator emeritus

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    #3
    It would seem that Mac gaming has finally arrived. :rolleyes:

    It's interesting because UT2003 was recently enhanced to remove the need to have the CD-ROM in the drive to play, as Halo had to be given the restriction to spur sales.

    I find it difficult to believe that the port cost as much as the original development and the price should reflect that, but often, the PC price is lower. Of course, there are quite a few more gamers buying on the PC side than the total of buying and pirating Mac gamers, full stop.
     
  4. macrumors 6502a

    mrsebastian

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    #4
    not really into gaming on my mac, i'd rather play my ps2 on the big screen. it'll be very interesting to see what happens to the gaming market as ps and m$ bring out their new consoles in coming years.
     
  5. macrumors 6502

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    #5
    i usually don't pirate games. and when i do, i buy them after, like halo, i wanted to see if it could run on my mac (12" pb 867 mghz 256 megs of ram) and suprisingly i get good frame rates at low-med quality, and i'm gonna buy the game in the next 2-3 weeks...
     
  6. macrumors 604

    MacBandit

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    #6
    I think it's because it's a Microsoft product. There are plenty of Mac users out there that absolutely refuse to give any money to Microsoft. So what's happening is they probably have buddies who have Halo and are playing it and raving about how much fun it is and want them to join them online so they either get a copy from there friends or they download one.

    Honestly I'm not impressed by Halo the graphics are shoddy in comparison to UT2003. Halo is a better platform game then a PC game due to that is what it was developed for after Microsoft jacked it.
     
  7. macrumors 604

    MacBandit

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    #7
    I feel the same way for most of the time but on some games like UT2003 the graphics are so intense with a good computer and video card that you could never settle for the low res of a television after seeing it on a computer screen.
     
  8. macrumors regular

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    #8
    A little more realistic

    Piracy on the Mac started when the Mac was released, some of you may be old enough to recall the mantra "Don't copy that floppy", from back in the Apple II, Tandy, C64 days.
    There's only a few ways to stop pircacy:
    1. Give your games away for free, and instead of relying on unit sales, sell ad space before and during the game. Imagine a Pepsi commercial as an intersticial between levels, or the main character sporting Gap jeans or billboards carrying actual product ads instead of made-up things.

    2. Give your game application away, but require connection to a subscription based server in order to play. This would work even for single player games. Most games are played on home computers, and home computers are usually connected to the internet. Make the game connect to a central server once a week. Make the connection useful to the player by constantly updating the game with new content (ie: weapons, characters, locations, plots, etc). Many MMORPG games have been quite successful with this approach.

    3. Stop producing software. Your piracy rate will go to 0 and you will not loose any more income.

    That's it. No other anti-piracy solution has proven effective.

    Dongles don't work, they are reverse engineered and emulated in software, or the code to check for them is simply removed/bypassed with a hack. Inentional errors in the media are equal in effectiveness to dongles. In the old days this was sometimes a hole punched in a floppy, in more recent times it's a purposely mis-formatted sector or two on a CD.

    Requiring the Floppy/CD/DVD to be in the drive just limits piracy to people who have, or know people who have, a CD/DVD burner(nearly all PC users today). Developers might try figuring out if the disk inserted is a pressed or burned CD, but I don't play games from my purchased CDs, I always play from a burned backup. Until/Unless I get lifetime replacement of scratched CDs from the vendors, I will continue to play from backups.

    Code books and serial numbers are not effective because it's even easier to tranfer these things around the internet than it is the game disks.


    As long as these vendors fail to understand that piracy can not be eliminated with the current distribution model and technologies, they will continue to suffer. The sooner they acept that the methodology is flawed and switch to a new one, the faster they will see sales increase, or at least see piracy decrease. For those paying attention, this is exactly the same issue that is facing the music industry right now, but the software manufacturers have more options.
     
  9. macrumors 603

    Dont Hurt Me

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    #9
    What these CEOs should be discussing is writing games for mac and doing a better job on coding for mac. we have seen some piss pot ports from all of these guys with enough bugs to fill a rain forest. After biting on Halo I have second thoughts on anything coming out of MacSoft. Never even returned my email but they probably had thousands. Maybe if they wrote games that worked they would sell more.
     
  10. macrumors 65816

    Fiveos22

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    #10
    First off, in response to mrsebastian's commment that console games on a big screen tv...Most computer gamers choose to do so because the games look far better on a computer than on a tv. A computer gives you the option to play at a resolution higher than 640x480, which, in my opinion, is wretched.

    Secondly, the mac gaming community has been given many more shoddy ports of games than it has been given good games. Why, when there is no demo available, should anyone purchase a game as a prospector? I would gladly pay for a game that didn't look poor on my G5 1.8, 9600 Pro.

    What I'm trying to say is pretty much "if you build it, they will come." Not vice versa. Ambrosia Software's Escape Velocity series is an excellent example of support from the Mac community
     
  11. macrumors 604

    MacBandit

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    #11
    This brings up another good point. I never ever ever buy a computer game or an expensive piece of software for me anything over $20 without first trying it.
     
  12. macrumors 6502a

    mrsebastian

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    #12
    i totally agree you can get much better resolution on the mac than a big screen. i should have elaborated more... i think consoles can't compete graphics wise at this point. however, with high def tvs and better consoles that could be changing fast.
     
  13. macrumors 6502

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    #13
    Halo is awesome

    I admit, I grabbed Halo from somewhere, but I am going to buy it as soon as its available in my area. Really fun game.. especially Multiplayer. I like the idea of getting money from companies to advertise in the game. That sounds awesome.
     
  14. macrumors 604

    MrMacMan

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    #14
    Re: A little more realistic

    Urrrrggg.

    This is why I hate MMORPG's... soo annoying, you buy the software... and then they want you to pay for online play...
    Me: 'NEEVVVERR!'
    Them: 'Must... have my precious... MONEY!'

    I find that extremely annoying, I wouldn't even mind 2 options... like for $20 dollars more, the product includes online play for a year... but this... BAH HORRIBLE.


    Provide demos.

    Get good reviews.


    Then I will get your game.
     
  15. macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2004
    #15
    I have bought a lot of software for my mac in the past 3 years, but almost none from a store. They are all packages that I could get to unlock within 10 minutes of ordering online.

    The main attraction to games like CoD and Halo are the multiplayer games. AFAIK the serial numbers for online playing cannot be generated since they need to be validated by the server.

    I also often want to play a game, here and now (like during x-mas break) but cannot predict when will be the next time I would have time to play it. Ordering a game today from Amazon, waiting a week to get it, and then hoping that I'll get to it next time I get a break does not sound like a smart $50 investment.

    Sell the serial numbers. Make it easy and FAST for people to get these. I do not understand why they think that users should drive 30 minutes to go to a store and get a paper box containing something which could be downloaded in few hours overnight.

    Just my $0.02.
     
  16. macrumors 6502a

    Sabenth

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    #16
    I dont play games on Mac but i can tell you this much if some one is going to copy somthing they will. theres always a way.. :)
     

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