Mac Game Prices

Discussion in 'Games' started by Dinowarrior18, Oct 28, 2004.

  1. Dinowarrior18 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2004
    Location:
    Miami
    #1
    Mac Game Prices

    What's the deal with these game companies charging many time twice the price for that Mac version of several Games. I had to wait over a year to find Halo for the Mac and it cost about $40 and yet the PC version is about $20. The Mac is basic shipped with all the parts needed to make a great gaming machine. You do not always need to buy anything extra except for RAM. Everytime I want a game I have to wait dont they realize that it does not take that much programming to convert a file from PC to Mac. All games today are made with C and Visual Basic which all can be compiled on a Mac for about the same price. Come on if you want to capture the gamers market then release the different with in weeks of each othe not months or years.
     
  2. yellow Moderator emeritus

    yellow

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2003
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #2
    The deal is...

    Mac porting houses have to 1) pay for licenses from PC developers and publishers, 2) spend quite a bit of money to then port the game from the PC to the Mac, and then 3) only have 1/50th the amount of gamers to sell to that WinTelThons have. The bottom line for Mac porting/publishing houses is significantly higher.

    This basically means that, like most hardware and software for the Mac, it's going to cost more.
     
  3. cubist macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2002
    Location:
    Muncie, Indiana
    #3
    Halo was $50 for the PC when it came out, too... but when games have been out for a while the price comes down. Right now you can go to your local Best Buy and get the Starcraft Battle Chest for $20 or Warcraft III for $20. They both include Mac versions. For Starcraft you'll have to download the Mac OS X installer/patch. Also, I noticed my local Menard's has Civilization III for $2.99.
     
  4. bousozoku Moderator emeritus

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2002
    Location:
    Gone but not forgotten.
    #4
    You're better off writing the publishers. We can't do much of anything to change what we already know isn't quite right.

    I take advantage of bargains wherever they happen to be but it usually takes a while. Even then, the port is that of a game that's been out for at least a few months so, by the time I buy it at a good price, it's been almost a year.

    Thankfully, a few things come in the same box as the x86 versions, so they're discounted automatically.
     
  5. a2daj macrumors member

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2004
    #5
    To add to what others have said, when a new Mac port is released, it's typicallly the same price as the PC version... when it was released. They tend to stay that price a little longer because of the size of the market.

    There is nothing "[not] quite right." (multiple negatives get confusing, so bear with me...) The publishers have to recoup their money somehow, and if you take into the consideration the low number of Mac gamers and then those who buy the games, it might take awhile for the publishers to make back the money on games.

    Aspyr mentioned that typically about 8-9 games out of 10 recoup the costs for all the work to get the Mac version. Of the 1-2 that don't make back the money, the sales of the other games even things out. Mac gaming is not a hugely profitable market, particularly if you don't know what you're doing and how the Mac market works. Even if you do, it's not always easy to break even.
     
  6. applekid macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2003
    #6
    And adding even more, sales are probably still good at these "high" prices, so the publishers will leave it there until, until they see sales drop. Once sales drop, prices will go down further, just as it would in the PC market. However, the PC market moves faster than the Mac market, so you often see prices drop drastically quickly.
     
  7. WhiteSavage macrumors regular

    WhiteSavage

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2004
    Location:
    Here.
    #7
    Hehe, one good thing if since it takes a while for the Mac versions to come out, sometimes you get extensions and add-ons for free in the box. FOr instance Battlefield 1942. $50 last I checked, it was the same for PC when it first came out, except we get the free bonus pack along with it. :)
     
  8. kingtj macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2003
    Location:
    Brunswick, MD
    #8
    Macs and gaming

    People always tell me I'm crazy for even trying to play games on my Mac, since it's just a more expensive way to get the job done than on a PC, and you have much less selection, longer wait times for new releases, etc.

    My only response to that is, as I get older, I don't have the free time I once had to game on the computer. These days, I get maybe an hour before bed here and there, or the rare afternoon on a weekend (when I probably should really be doing something else that needs to be done instead).

    At least on the Mac, you tend to get the "cream of the crop" game titles - because they first see what sells well on the PC, and only make the effort to port the ones they think are most popular/worthwhile. So simply seeing a game come out for Mac means it's likely going to be worth your time to play, and you'll get your money's worth out of the purchase.

    If I wanted to play everything new on the day it came out, then no - a Mac would be practically worthless. But let's face it, that's usually only a concern for the younger crowd that has the time to play all those games and lacks the money to pay for most of them (so they pirate 99% of the new stuff they're using on day 1 of its release).

    Personally, I feel better about paying $45 or so for a Mac game than paying $20 for the Windows version. I know my money is truly appreciated and helps ensure future development for my "niche market" computer. On a Windows title, my purchase makes up a much smaller portion of the "profit pie" the developer receives.
     
  9. WhiteSavage macrumors regular

    WhiteSavage

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    Oct 4, 2004
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    Here.
  10. tom.96 macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2003
    Location:
    UK (southern)
    #10
    Well how about this for helping mac games.

    I have noticed that a Mac game tends to have quite a short shelf life, and when this is up it tends to disappear. PC gamers have a much broader selection of budget and classic titles.

    So.... why not reissue some older games at say £10 each on a new budget range. Give the compilation market a shake up with some new awesome packs. Maybe this could work, maybe not. It seems like a way they could get more revenue from a title over a longer period of time. In the UK at least getting these older titles can be a challenge, and I personally would be welcoming the chance to buy some older classics.

    Gives the gaming public more choice and the game producers more revenue.

    Just my thoughts.
     
  11. yellow Moderator emeritus

    yellow

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2003
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #11
    Just remember that "oler classics" on the Mac platform litterally will run using Classic, if they run at all. In some cases, companies (assumingg they still exist) aren't going to spend the money to go back and Carbonize an old game, or ensure that it runs in Classic.

    Personally, I'd love to have Alpha Centauri and Alien Crossfire carbonized, but Aspyr will never do it.
     
  12. applekid macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2003
    #12
    There are those beta patches...

    But, Aspyr is interested in doing a "Lost Classics" series for the Mac where they carbonize some popular Mac oldies. Check out the thread in the IMG Forum. People bring it up once in a while, so feel free to add your comments if you wan to. There is no status report on the whole idea, though, which is sorta disappointing, but Aspyr appears to keep themselves busy with ports.
     
  13. Poff macrumors 65816

    Poff

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2003
    Location:
    Stavanger, Norway
    #13
    If people started paying for games instead of copying, games might have become cheaper. Macgamer.com had some good articles on piracy. Even though I've been against it for a long time, those articles made me even more consistent.
     

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