Mac Pro and WD Velociraptors

Discussion in 'Mac Pro' started by CGB, Apr 15, 2013.

  1. CGB
    macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2013
    #1
    I have noticed some people managed to get the velociraptor drives working in their systems.

    I know these drives have these "ice pack" heatsinks. They look so out of the ordinary that I thought they will in no way fit inside the mac hard drive slot. Am I right? Do you have to remove the heatsink or something ?
     
  2. macrumors P6

    Intell

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2010
    Location:
    Inside
    #2
    Those drives come in a required heatsink that is the same form factor as a standard 3.5" desktop hard drive.
     
  3. CGB
    thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2013
    #3
    The drive is 2.5'', so the heatsink makes it 3.5'' ? I can just screw the drive into the bracket and go along my way ?

    Are all the sizes (600G, 1TB, etc) the same way?
     
  4. macrumors P6

    Intell

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    #4
    Yes. But those drives need the heatsink to work and will overheat if not in them. They also cannot work in laptops because of their power requirements.
     
  5. CGB
    thread starter macrumors newbie

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    #5
    Great -

    Thanks !
     
  6. macrumors 601

    Tesselator

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Japan
    #6
    They are also now almost completely obsolete as the 1TB single platter Barracudas perform almost identically and yet don't need any special anything. Actually so do the 2TB and 3TB Barracudas - so that's actually better. ;) So velociraptor users: Eat your hearts out! :p
     
  7. macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2011
    #7
    I have 4 160GB VelociRaptors in Raid 0 and it is crazy fast, all 4 are in the drive sleds and fit perfectly. I am very happy with these drives, they were not expensive, in fact they very rather cheap for 4 of them and give me about 600GB of storage with better reads and writes then a SATA 3 SSD
     
  8. macrumors 601

    derbothaus

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2010
    #8
    Except for the random and i/o which matter quite a bit unless all you do is stream sequential. Which no one does.

    http://www.tomshardware.com/charts/hdd-charts-2012/-20-IOMeter-2006.07.27-Database,2922.html
    http://www.tomshardware.com/charts/hdd-charts-2012/-07-Read-Access-Time-h2benchw-3.16,2898.html

    So not entirely obsolete. Raptors destroy these benches for HDD. But obviously SSD is way faster still. But a Barracuda? Please. Nice phat bandwidth only. Boot drive they are not.
     
  9. macrumors 601

    Tesselator

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    #9
    Agree with the exception that large sequential streaming is all I do on the drives. And most people using the drives for data while keeping the OS and apps on an SSD will also be more-so in this class too.

    But you're right, there is a very slight advantage in random I/O with the raptor drives. I wouldn't buy one these days tho. They're gone. Maybe if they come up with a new design in the future but currently the raptor drives and the barracuda drives are just too similar. And with the barracuda drives being bigger and cheaper too the raptors are actually undesirable (for me - and I guess most decreeing users).

    ----------

    Only for sequential reads and writes. For random I/O and more especially small file random reads it takes all four bays to get about half the speed as a single $450 SSD or $150 SSHD of approximately the same size.
     
  10. macrumors 601

    derbothaus

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2010
    #10
    I'd buy them if they were only marginally more expensive. :D
    Like $20-50.
    $140.00 more for same storage is pretty expensive for that percentage of speed gain but it is a gain nonetheless.
     
  11. macrumors 68020

    crjackson2134

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2013
    Location:
    Charlotte, NC
    #11
    I actually have two of them. They are fast, but I'm leaving them in my older PC system (that I don't use) because they are really power hungry and produce quite a bit of heat during heavy use.

    I'm saving my pennies for SSD and a PCI SATA3 card to hold it. Probably gonna get a Sonnet rig.
     
  12. macrumors 601

    Tesselator

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    #12
    I probably wouldn't. Their capacity is too small, they're too hot, and too power hungry. Three years ago, sure but I can't think of a system design today on any scale where they would make choice parts. Maybe if WDC adds 32GB of NAND to them or something then they could once again become desirable for some builds but as they are now... Mmmm... :rolleyes: Or maybe if electricity was cheaper or free and I also had 12 or 14 drive bays open per system... :p

    I just looked them up on Amazon and they're not all that expensive any longer. Just 6 or 8 months ago they were like $350 for the 1TB models but now they're only like $220 and that's in-line with some other normal HDD models so maybe you can go for it.
     
  13. macrumors 601

    derbothaus

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2010
    #13
    They would need to be more like $140.00 for 1TB.
     
  14. macrumors 601

    Tesselator

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    #14
    Yeah, I guess I could see that...
     
  15. macrumors 68000

    phrehdd

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2008
    #15
    The 1 tb raptors are pretty nice when used in RAID. The real kick with them is they come with a 5 year warranty unlike drives that are nearly as fast overall.

    These would be pretty nice drives when WD gets around (if they do) to emulating what Seagate has done with their Momentus line and make a hybrid drive. Price-wise, one could get 2 1tb raptors for less than the price of a large SSD drive and get excellent speed. I consider RAIDed Raptors to be the poor man's smart counterpart to SSD when speed AND VOLUME is required.
     
  16. macrumors 601

    Tesselator

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    #16
    To me the 5-year is almost worthless. In 5 years I'll be using or at least wanting the one petabyte drives - more than likely - and they'll probably be holographic crystal drives or something. Five years ago (actually late 2007) the very first 1TB drive was introduced. And 5 years before that we were at 40 to 80GB drives. Five before that it was 100MB. Given a similar pace in 5 years from now I just won't care if that slow rotational drive is still under warrantee or not. Three years is fine for me. :)

    BTW, WDC is indeed working on a hybrid drive.
    http://www.tomshardware.com/news/WD-SSHD-SSD-HDD-Ultrabook,21157.html
    http://www.xbitlabs.com/news/storag...s_Solid_State_Hybrid_Drive_Slips_to_2014.html


    .
     
  17. macrumors 603

    thekev

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2010
    #17
    I used one in a G5 many years ago:p.
     
  18. macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2012
    #18
    Yeah, my G5 Quad has one happily chugging away as its boot drive. I have owned four of Raptors, and they have performed well. Pre-SSD, they were the best choice for a number of situations. But my current MP? SSD for almost everything except back up. I do audio, not video, so file size is manageable and SSDs make me happy.
     
  19. macrumors 68000

    phrehdd

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2008
    #19
    Not to be rude but I'll address your response a bit here -

    First - the 5 year warranty as opposed to 3 years allows the drives to be shifted over to other use such as a spare if a better drive comes along before then or the SSD's reach 1 tb or more at a reasonable price.

    Second - every notice that statistically, 5 year warranty drives tend to have less failure rates than 3 year warranty drives? This is far more important as we all know its a hit and miss affair with any electro-mechanical platter drives.

    Perhaps in 5 years we wont have any drives and all data will be flowing via the air waves and we just grab ours from it as needed (sarcastic).
     
  20. macrumors 601

    eawmp1

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2008
    Location:
    FL
    #20
    OP - a Velociraptor straight from OWC fit perfectly in my Pro and was my boot drive from 2009 until I went to SSD last year. Nary a hiccup except it was loud.

    It you have the funds, however, I'd spend money on a smaller SSD boot drive and use larger platter drives in the other bays.
     
  21. Tesselator, Apr 17, 2013
    Last edited: Apr 17, 2013

    macrumors 601

    Tesselator

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2008
    Location:
    Japan
    #21
    No rudeness detected below.

    Yeah, I used to think like that. Now I have a box of over 200 drives in my closet ranging from 10MB to about 100GB. None of them ever got shifted and after about 2 or 3 years they were just removed from use in the system completely. Of course revisiting a previous point; if electricity were free and I had a 20 or 30 interface device to hook them all up then I might still have a use for some of them. 1TB drives are now at the same point for me - near to becoming obsolete or useless - in fact I guess they already have as there are no more 1TB drives in any of my systems. :p


    If you could show a real empirical relationship then sure. I'm not convinced one exists other than in the mind.


    Hehe, hey don't joke... it seems to be going exactly that way too!


    .
     
  22. macrumors G4

    Joined:
    May 6, 2008
    #22
    Generate your own statistics from reviews on sites such as newegg, and determine your own conclusions (go through it and toss out reviews such as 5 stars due to newegg service, ... types of things). ;)

    There is a correlation, but you have to pay attention to the details. Particularly if it's enterprise vs. consumer and what the platters may be, given how much is actually shared between drives these days. For example, in most cases, mechanicals are identical (servos, heads, spindle motors, and case), but there may be better specc'ed platters and/or additional sensors added to keep the drive in check.

    Sadly, the days of improved mounting systems, better bearings and motors are gone for the most part. :( About the only way you see this now, is with SAS disks, but this usually means an entirely different disk (one exception will be 7200 RPM models sharing at least some mechanicals, if not all, and strapped to a different controller PCB).
     
  23. macrumors 601

    Tesselator

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    Jan 9, 2008
    Location:
    Japan
    #23
    Sure, I guess we could deduce a correlation and make that singular point but at a little over four times the price per gig redundancy offers itself up as a better solution anyway. :)

    Of course I mean that buying four 1TB drives of something like the ST1000DM003 for the same price as one VR and using the extra three as shelved replacements (slash backups) will be more advantageous and probably end up lasting two or three times as long as the Raptor.
     
  24. macrumors G4

    Joined:
    May 6, 2008
    #24
    I only approached it from the 3yr vs. 5yr comment regarding reliability, not specifically to a particular drive or even brand. :cool:
     
  25. macrumors 601

    Tesselator

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2008
    Location:
    Japan
    #25
    True. But since the thread title included "Velociraptor" I thought I'd bring it home. :)

    And I think the ST1000DM003 is the nearest competitor - tho it only has a 2-year warrantee. :rolleyes:
     

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