Mac Pro for Daily Use

Discussion in 'Mac Pro' started by colonelradec, Aug 21, 2011.

  1. macrumors newbie

    Aug 21, 2011
    Hi Guys
    I'm going to sell my PC and get a Macintosh.
    I use it for daily use and I'll play some games.
    I know Mac Pro is very overpowered for daily use.It looks like hunting birds w/ a cannon.But I love it.
    What do u think about it ? Should I get it or get something different.Thanks a lot.
  2. Neodym, Aug 21, 2011
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2011

    macrumors 65816


    Jul 5, 2002
    You don't need to justify yourself - if you like the computer, there is no need to artificially find or construct arguments for buying it! Today's world often is organised in what people think is the "most efficient" way. However - we are humans and entitled to act irrationally, e.g. by buying a computer that is helplessly overpowered for that little surfing and casual gaming we do.

    Others are buying huge cars they don't really need to get from A to B - just because they like them!

    So in your case i'd say: If you can afford it, then do it!

    And if you need some artificial arguments: Point to the 4 drive bays, mention your preference for OSX and say, that you are doing video editing and everyone will become quiet and accept your choice. :D
  3. thread starter macrumors newbie

    Aug 21, 2011

    OMG.U're right.I didn't think that.BTW thanks for the argumets. :cool:
    Should I buy 4 core or 8 core ?
  4. macrumors regular

    Feb 14, 2008
    New Mac Pros are probably coming before the end of the year so if you cannot wait, the most sensible choice right now is the 6-core 3.33GHz model. I wouldn't bother with the 4 core model as it's outclassed by the current high-end iMacs. Only get the 12 core if you can afford it.
  5. macrumors G4

    May 6, 2008
    The suitable parts aren't due out until Q4 2011, and it takes time to get systems assembled for shipment (typically another 13 weeks = 1Q). So realistically, those waiting for the next MP models would be looking at Feb. or March of 2012, assuming there's no problems on the production/final validation end of those systems.
  6. macrumors 603


    Apr 13, 2010
    I don't know if you mod gear. A quad 2.8 can be found and upgraded to a hex 3.33 in under an hour for about 500 bucks. so if you are handy you can have a hex 3.33 for about 2500 to 2700 instead of 3600.

    amazon selling open box quads for 2057.00

    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ on ebay sells the upgrade cpu for 618


    cost is 2675 for a hex 3.33

    2499 at apple pick the same 3.33 hex and it is 3699


    all the instructions on how to diy it

  7. macrumors 68000

    Sep 24, 2008
    Boon Docks USA
    I second getting a six core, or quad and upgrading yourself. Might as well future proof and get the most you can afford. You won't regret it.
  8. thread starter macrumors newbie

    Aug 21, 2011
    I think I can change the CPU
    6 Core : 3699
    8 Core : 3499
    Do u know why is six core overpriced ? There is 2 CPU socket in 8 core.It's more upgradeble.But $200 cheaper than 6 core.
  9. peabo, Aug 22, 2011
    Last edited: Aug 22, 2011

    macrumors regular

    Feb 14, 2008
    That is true, but Q4 starts in October and Apple will likely have access to early samples of the technology to allow them to bring the system to market earlier than most people. They have gotten first dibs on intel chips and chips from other manufacturers in the past such as the intel processor that was used in the original Air and the 8-core Clovertown chip that went in the first 8-core Mac Pro.

    The Clovertown chip in particular became available in July 2007 but appeared in the Mac Pro much earlier, April 2007 to be specific.
  10. macrumors 604


    Jan 26, 2008
    Isla Nublar
    Well, I wont ridicule your choice but I will say this:

    If you are going to be playing some games and don't need the latest and greatest in graphics I'd suggest maybe getting an iMac and an iPad. I'll cost less and give you two great devices to use.
  11. macrumors 6502

    Aug 13, 2011
    This for sure.

    You might like the Mac Pro, but the performance of the bottom end quad-core model is going to be worse than that of the 2.7GHz iMac models when it comes to single-core applications, and with multi-threaded applications, both the 2.93GHz i7 and the current 3.4GHz i7 are going to be faster than the Mac Pro, as well as cheaper and with a 27 inch display.

    What I'm saying is that even for most professionals, a top-end iMac is often a better choice now than the bottom-end Mac Pro. If you're spending money on the higher end Mac Pros...well then, that just starts getting into silly money.
  12. macrumors 65816


    Nov 15, 2010
    Edinburgh, UK
    I moved to my current Mac Pro from an iMac because of the heat and screen discolouring that seemed to be common in the higher-specced iMacs at the time.

    Its main use is "daily" stuff and light gaming (WoW, Minecraft) that would be well within the remit of an iMac but I am enjoying the lack of cable clutter since all my drives are internal and the machine runs nice and cool.

    I do agree that an iMac plus iPad is a fair recommendation but if you can afford the specced MP then you won't regret it.

    (Memory was a third-party upgrade after purchase).
  13. macrumors regular

    Mar 28, 2010
    You could buy an iMac, a MacBook Air, an iPad, and an iPhone for less than you will pay for a base model Mac Pro + Apple Display.

    Think about it.

  14. macrumors Nehalem


    Feb 19, 2005
    I think you mean justify. ;)
    ^This is what I would say as well. The only thing that makes me not sell my oct-core 2.8 MacPro is that the iMac has a glossy screen and that will never work for me for large displays.
  15. thread starter macrumors newbie

    Aug 21, 2011
  16. macrumors regular

    Feb 14, 2008
    The core i7 3.4GHz is a very fast machine and will outclass the Mac Pro in a lot of areas, particularly apps that don't use all 8 cores such as games. The graphics card will be a little weaker but if you really need such a thing, there will soon be external thunderbolt enclosures that can take desktop-class cards.
  17. macrumors 601


    Sep 14, 2006
    Because the two 4-core processors cost $750 and a 6-core costs $1000. The 8-core in a sense is also a base model (base 2-socket Mac Pro) where the 6-core is an upgrade and companies charge premiums for upgrades.
  18. macrumors 601


    Jul 17, 2010
    Also the 6-core is faster. Sometimes WAY faster. Apple prices according to real performance usually. Look at the refurb 2.4GHz 8-cores they are like 350.00 or more reduced.
  19. macrumors 6502

    Aug 13, 2011
    To the OP, I wouldn't be looking at a machine higher end than the iMac 27 3.1GHz i5 (the top end pre-configured model), to be honest. Save your money for games, storage, or whatever, and/or buy some extra toys. You will be far more satisfied in the long run with that.
  20. macrumors 65816


    Apr 24, 2008
    In that one place
    Maybe the OP doesn't like having to send back a mirror every year because it started turning yellow.
  21. macrumors G4

    May 6, 2008
    Yes, Q4 starts in October, but given the information out regarding the LGA2011 and accompanying chipset series, an October release seems unlikely. So November or even December are more realistic targets (last I saw, Intel is trying to meet a November release - no week given, but as it's a rush, I prefer to be cautious and will figure for December).

    As per early shipments to get systems out ahead of other vendors, that hasn't happened with the MP since 2009. The 2010 systems arrived later (~ 13 weeks after Intel's official launch of the Westmere's IIRC). The reason I suspect, is they just don't have the volume purchasing power for the MP's that they once did (pricing, probably, but not quantities sufficient enough for early shipments as well).

    As per the board work, Foxconn has had access to ES versions of LGA2011, just like any other board maker in order to validate their PCB designs (Foxconn has been the ODM for the MP since 2009 systems). But even once they get the design completed, they still have to validate what's coming off of the assembly lines to be sure there wasn't a mistake between the final prototype (RTM design) and the production systems that roll out the door. This takes some time, particularly if there is a mistake (i.e. wrong part value for the PCB location sorts of things...). Once the assembly line output is verified to be correct, then they just need time to get systems assembled and accumulated to meet the first shipment.

    If there's no major problems, the final assembly line validation + initial manufacturing run + shipping takes ~ 13 weeks on average. And this is the case for more than just systems; it's the same for components (assemblies down to discrete parts).
  22. macrumors newbie

    Aug 24, 2011
    MacBook Pro or MacBook Air

    Hello people!

    I was thinking of purchasing a MacBook Pro, then again I saw the MacBook Air and it looks quite appealing. These are my options:

    1. MacBook Pro 500Gb -$1342
    2. MacBook Air 250Gb- $1749 or 128Gb - $1399

    It's only for everyday use for University and work. What do you think is a better buy?
  23. macrumors 6502a

    Mar 15, 2011
    this is the Mac Pro section :) but to answer your question; if its for work-related stuff only then grab the air.
    keep in mind that the Air does not have a built-in optical drive though.
    if you can live without optical drive ( or with external one ) then Air
  24. macrumors newbie

    Aug 24, 2011
    Thanks 'Blunti' Sorry i just realised that this was the Mac Pro section.

    Thank you for your advice, it's much appreciated :)
  25. macrumors 6502

    Apr 19, 2009
    Unless you can go for that 3.33 hex, I would grab one of these new 27" iMacs. They would fit your needs and wants perfectly. And like others have noted, external thunderbolt gfx cards are on the way for even more power.

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