Macs in education

Discussion in 'General Mac Discussion' started by G4scott, Apr 13, 2002.

  1. G4scott macrumors 68020

    G4scott

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2002
    Location:
    Austin, TX
    #1
    I'm not sure if many of you here have been to Apple's education page. If not, check it out. It's not a 'praise the Mac' site, but rather, a very helpful guide to implementing technology into education. I suggest you go to www.apple.com/education/planning/process/index.html.

    It is very informative. If anyone in here is a student in a school with badly implemented technology (like mine), show your school's/district's technology advisor this page. Tell him/her to read through it all, and ask their opinion about your school's technology based on what Apple says.

    The problem with technology in schools, is that people see "cheap computers, buy dell", and don't even think about the students, any types of goals, etc... This needs to change, and the only way it can, is to inform people of how it can change.

    Make a difference in this world...
     
  2. mac15 macrumors 68040

    mac15

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2001
    Location:
    Sydney
    #2
    at my school our admin has a mac
    but the scholl won't buy any they just spent $20000
    on gateways :mad:
    and he begged an pleaded with the princiapl
    but no and know we have a bunch of crappy gateways
    when we could of had powermacs :(
     
  3. Buggy macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2001
    Location:
    Canada
    #3
    I am a high school teacher so I am all too familiar with computer choice and purchasing. I am also familiar with the implementation of technology throughout the curriculum.

    1st Mac vs. PC

    I teach graphics and video. Because of this I am allowed to raise funds and purchase Macs. It also helps that the media arts area, supports the school in many ways; live and taped TV broadcast, yearbook, logos for teams, school store graphics, course calendar, etc. etc. etc. The PC guys try to do it sometimes but because of the type of students they 'generally' get, they product is not that well designed graphically... but that is not to say it is not competent... Just not the polish of a graphics student. This has put the Admin on our side and allowed us to show the power of our tools (macs.).

    Funding is EXTEMELY tight!!! Our school was on a 17-year rotation of our computers until this year (if we spent every dollar of tech budget on computers... then the last of the rotation would be leaving the doors 17 years from now... imagine using a computer from 1985 as your regular computer.) High-end labs get the newest and it filters down. We then have to do extra fund raising for anything else. The yearbook and video sales help finance the Macs.

    I sit on the purchasing committee and honestly I support the purchasing of PCs in non-specialty areas (music, art, video, and science...yes science uses Mac for Data acquisition). The VAST majority of students who have computers at home have PC's. Also PC's network better to an NT server. No we will not have an Apple server. Our IT managers and our software investments are in Windows.

    Your school probably purchased 2x the number of gateways than Macs. We actually won't buy gateways or low end Dells (business level Dells we may consider but we haven't yet). There are way to many problems with them and the Cost of Ownership is much too high. Our PC's come in at approx the same cost as the CRT iMac (prices vary). Cost of ownership is still lower on a Mac. But the Networking, II support and common platform, win out.

    2) As per implementation of technology.

    There is good news and bad news.

    Good news.
    Students are much more familiar with the basics of an operating system. I haven’t taught opening, closing, saving, the gui, etc. for many many years. Therefore it is quicker to jump right into the content. Teachers are becoming much more comfortable with the technology. In my school we have abandoned most forms of paper communication. Grades, attendance, interim reporting, and email are standard. Also it is mandated by the ministry of education that ALL courses have an IT content.

    Bad news.
    Still many teachers only know the basics of technology. Even with over 300 computers in our school of 1700 students. We do not have enough access to fulfill our obligations to teach technology to every student. And the ability to purchase technology is getting worse.
     

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