Mail 2.0 Bug?

Discussion in 'Mac Apps and Mac App Store' started by patseguin, May 20, 2005.

  1. patseguin macrumors 65816

    patseguin

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2003
    #1
    Whenever Mail has new messages, the scroll bar is all screwed up and not all of the new messages are displayed unless I minimize Mail and then restore it. Anyone else seeing this behavior? I never had anything like this with Mail in Panther.
     
  2. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2004
    Location:
    Grand Rapids, MI, USA
    #2
    I haven't seen this in Mail 2.
     
  3. witness macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2005
    Location:
    Austria
    #3
    I've seen a couple of other bugs in Mail 2, but not this one.
     
  4. patseguin thread starter macrumors 65816

    patseguin

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2003
    #4
    I installed and subsequently un-installed the Tiger-compatible ShapeShifter. Could that be the problem?
     
  5. munkle macrumors 68030

    munkle

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2004
    Location:
    On a jet plane
    #5
    Most likely as I've haven't encountered the bug that you've got. I suggest doing a Find search in Finder (command-f) to make sure you've got rid of all Shapeshifter files.
     
  6. patseguin thread starter macrumors 65816

    patseguin

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2003
    #6
    Or better yet, a Spotlight search? ;)
     
  7. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2004
    Location:
    Grand Rapids, MI, USA
    #7
    Did you reboot after uninstalling shapeshifter? I don't know exactly how it works, but it might not have gotten completely removed from memory (there may be processes or kernel extensions floating around) if you uninstalled it but didn't reboot. Some of the other system modification type programs are like this.

    EDIT: BTW, Cmd-F in Finder *is* a Spotlight-driven search. It's spotlight all the way through, baby! :)
     
  8. munkle macrumors 68030

    munkle

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2004
    Location:
    On a jet plane
    #8
    Depending on your Spotlight preferences, it won't make such a thorough search of your system. For example, preferences files won't show up. Of course both searches are using Spotlight technology.
     
  9. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2004
    Location:
    Grand Rapids, MI, USA
    #9
    You know what's strange? I was about to make this same comment when I was editing my last reply. I'm on 10.4.0, with everything checked in the Spotlight prefs in sys prefs, and nothing selected in the privacy tab -- which I think is the default. I could've sworn that in the past, this would resulted in files from the system and root library folders being omitted. But today, it seemed to find plists and files in the /library folder. I wonder why this is different now than it was for me???
     
  10. patseguin thread starter macrumors 65816

    patseguin

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2003
    #10
    Both are very good points. I don't think I did reboot after uninstalling. As a matter of fact, I tried emptying the trash yesterday and it couldn't delete some file related to ShapeShifter. You would think I would put 2+2. ;)

    Also, very good point on search. I had forgotten that Spotlight technology was system-wide.
     
  11. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2004
    Location:
    Grand Rapids, MI, USA
    #11
    Repair permissions too (from Disk Utility in the Utilities folder). Might as well. Never know.
     
  12. patseguin thread starter macrumors 65816

    patseguin

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2003
    #12
    I never understood why repairing permissions was necessary and how it effects performance. If the OS is so advanced, why is something like repairing permissions needed?
     
  13. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2004
    Location:
    Grand Rapids, MI, USA
    #13
    If some kernel extension or other system file has the wrong permissions, it may prevent that file from loading on startup. There are sometimes legitimate reasons to do this; that would be my guess as to why it's allowed to happen in the first place.

    I suppose the OS could have a background task that checked permissions on files frequently and fixed them for you. The problem arises when installers or uninstallers or other programs that modify a file don't give it back the right permissions. To be honest, if you're not installing or removing any software, you don't really need to repair permissions very often, although it never hurts.
     

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