Making an iPod battery.

Discussion in 'Macintosh Computers' started by javabear90, Jul 21, 2004.

  1. macrumors 6502a

    javabear90

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2003
    Location:
    Houston, TX
    #1
    Well I'm being a poor starving student and cannont afford a belkin battery pack (saving every penny for a D70) So I was thinking that I could just make one. Well what I came up with is that if I like 6 AA betteries in a series together and then hook them up to a firewire port (which I have) and cramed it all into a box and spray painted it white for good meaure. Would this work, any advice, and/or tips would be appricated!
    Thanks,
    Ted
     
  2. macrumors G5

    Sun Baked

    Joined:
    May 19, 2002
    #2
    Cannot afford to pay $70 for a Belkin Battery pack, so you think up novel ways to risk more expensive equipment.

    Hmmm... I don't think I'll put up that smiley, even though it's deserved. :rolleyes:
     
  3. macrumors 68030

    Duff-Man

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2002
    Location:
    Albuquerque, NM
    #3
    Duff-Man says.....if it toasts your iPod, pass on the tip to this guy - he's looking to fraudulantly kill his pod so he can get the newer model....oh yeah!
     
  4. macrumors 68000

    musicpyrite

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2004
    Location:
    Cape Cod
    #4
    If I'm correct USB outputs 5 volts and FireWire should output 8 volts. (I'm just going to assume that the iPod needs 8V to charge) But you want to use 6 AA batteries, which would output 9 volts, and that could possibly fry your iPod, so if I were you I would only use 5 batteries. (totaling 7.5V)

    You should also have a good knolege of how electricity works. (AC and DC) about 8 months ago a dude in my town was killed after he tried to pick up a downed power line. (of course 9V shouldn't kill you ;) )

    If you end up frying your iPod, just do the DuLL iPod trade-in program, get a Dell DJ, sell it on eBay, and buy a nice shiny new 4th gen iPod with a battery life of 12 hours!

    It should work but I'm not betting any balls on it.
     
  5. thread starter macrumors 6502a

    javabear90

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2003
    Location:
    Houston, TX
    #5
    well the ipod is rated 8- 30 volts. The poweradapter puts out 12 volts. I assume that I can't hurt my iPod by to little voltage however I can by to much. Also there was some guy who made one out of 2 9 volt batteries in parrell and 2 AA in series and put it into a deck of cards. That worked however I do not like how you have to mix battery types. Also I will test the output of the battery pack with a voltage meter before I connect it. so..... I hope it works! :cool:
     
  6. macrumors 68020

    yippy

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2004
    Location:
    Chicago, IL
    #6
    Yes you can!!!

    A guy has done it, I read about it in Popular science, he has a website with instruction on how to make your own batterypack. Can't remember it now, I will look it up and get back to you.
     
  7. macrumors 68020

    yippy

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2004
    Location:
    Chicago, IL
    #7
    Found it.

    You want 12 volts, but here is the linc. Have fun :) .
     
  8. thread starter macrumors 6502a

    javabear90

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2003
    Location:
    Houston, TX
    #8
    Link is dead :( :mad: I have tried it before. Also my "sample" firewire port from Molex has arrived :rolleyes: ;) :D
     
  9. macrumors 68020

    yippy

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2004
    Location:
    Chicago, IL
    #9
    The linc works for me. Weird, well, if you want it I could sent you the page as an html document.
     
  10. macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    May 6, 2004
    Location:
    SC
    #10
    Actually it's not the number of volts that'll kill you, it's the number of amps. You can have 10,000 volts, and live if the amps are really small.
     
  11. macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2004
    Location:
    Dublin, Ireland
    #11
    Yeah sure. Read this guy's blog. He's currently battling with an iPod that doesn't work. I wonder if he's ***ked up his iPod? Seems like a great idea, save yourself a few dollars using a DIY (non-rechargable) battery, and fry your iPod.
     
  12. macrumors G3

    Counterfit

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2003
    Location:
    sitting on your shoulder
    #12
    V = I x R. Where: V = Voltage I = Current. R = Resistance
    10,000 = 2A (for example) x 5,000? ( <- that should be an Omega ;))
    I'm sure someone here could figure out the heat coming off that resistor ;)
     

Share This Page