Manual?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by jer446, Feb 11, 2006.

  1. macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2004
    #1
    I just got a nikon D50, my first slr camera.. Im pretty excited.. I would like to learn how to use this camera to it fullest, so want to read up on how to shoot manual, and what all the numbers mean. I might buy some more lenses later down the line.. Any sites i can that can teach me the basics of manual photography?
     
  2. macrumors demi-goddess

    Clix Pix

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2005
    Location:
    8 miles from the Apple Store at Tysons (VA)
    #2
    There is a site at http://www.morguefile.com which has a series of lessons on using your camera, complete with specific assignments. When you go to the site, look at the nav info on the right-hand side and about halfway down you'll see "Classes." Click on that and it'll take you to the course, which was done by Jodie Coston, a freelance photographer.

    Aside from that, I would go to the local public library and check out a few books on basic photography, or go to the bookstore and buy a couple. There are a lot of books out there which describe the basics of f/stops, aperture priority, shutter priority, depth of field, etc....

    Have fun with your new camera!
     
  3. thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2004
    #3
    books?? what are those?:p Id prefer something online, because i dont have to go out.. and i will have it available to me now..
     
  4. macrumors demi-goddess

    Clix Pix

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2005
    Location:
    8 miles from the Apple Store at Tysons (VA)
    #4
    I was browsing around tonight and stumbled upon a site which may be of interest to you: http://www.caughtonfilmphoto.com/ldpt, which is actually "Learning Digital Photography Together" and has lessons, forums, etc. There is a membership fee in order to join it, which may be a drawback. It looks as though they started out using the lessons that I'd mentioned earlier, Jodie Coston's Morguefile ones, but that will be changing and they will be doing something else for the next session of classes. You might want to look into this, see what you think....
     
  5. macrumors 6502a

    crazydreaming

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2005
    Location:
    Salt Lake City, UT -Westminster College
    #5
    After going over a year with my film SLR, I'm finally taking a class.

    My professor is having us shoot in complete manual mode. I highly recommend it, I'm understanding everything 100 times better than before and am really starting to get some nice stuff. Best way to shoot.

    If you're really serious, see if you could possibly get into a photography class at a community college or something. Just an idea.
     
  6. macrumors 68030

    jared_kipe

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2003
    Location:
    Seattle
    #6
    I disagree, aperture priority and shutter priority definitely have their place. So does program, where you can choose from many metered combinations.

    I only use manual mode if the camera isn't metering it like how I want, or I'm doing macro flash stuff where the meter doesn't usually get it right anyway.

    Though surprisingly, if I set my camera to say f16 and 1/200 seconds with my Sigma EF-500 DG Super flash, the flash seems to compensate the right amount of flash nearly every time. Which makes my job a lot easier.
     
  7. macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2004
    Location:
    Chicago (by way of SF)
    #7
    I don't think crazydreaming was saying anything against A or S priority shooting, just that using manual is a good learning tool -- and I agree. If you are completely new to photography you do not learn much by shooting in auto. So to learn the influence of shutter speed and aperture settings, you should learn to shoot in manual mode. After you fully understand these settings, then you can use whatever variations your camera allows.
     
  8. macrumors 68030

    jared_kipe

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2003
    Location:
    Seattle
    #8
    Meh, thats kinda like the thought of learning computers by learning DOS or command line UNIX first.

    You can get used to how shutter speed and aperture settings work in Av and Tv modes just fine. And if you ever come across something you have to shoot quickly it would it be better for him to try to find the correct manual setting in time, or just look and shoot in whatever mode he already had set up and let technology take care of exposure. That said, a lot of the time if I notice the camera under or overexposed something, instead of going into manual, I just dial in some exposure compensation. Much faster than going into manual and setting up your aperture and shutterspeed again.
     
  9. macrumors member

    Joined:
    May 24, 2004
    #9
    Here's 20 years experience working in photography and cinematography. Learn manual exposure. Go buy yourself a Pentax K1000, and shoot a few rolls of unforgiving slide film. That'll get the basics in your head.See where you are going wrong.....and right.

    You'll work much better with a do it all automatic digital camera if you know why it's doing what it's doing. Learn all about film/sensor sensitivity, aperture, and shutter speed, and how they all must work in partnership to achieve the desired aim.

    When you know the rules then you can break the rules. Otherwise you're just banging around in the dark.

    Larry
     
  10. macrumors 6502a

    JDar

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2003
    #10
  11. macrumors 6502

    snap58

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2006
    Location:
    somewhere in kansas
    #11
    Well put!
     
  12. macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2004
    Location:
    AU
    #12
    I agree as well.
    And in the short run, stick to a single fixed lens (e.g. 50mm). Master that, first, before you start using zooms.
     
  13. macrumors 6502a

    crazydreaming

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2005
    Location:
    Salt Lake City, UT -Westminster College
    #13
    Yea about Av and Tv priority...

    Before taking this class, that is what I was shooting in. And to be honest, I barely learned a thing compared to what I'm learning now shooting manual. If you are an amature jumping right into Av or Tv, it's really just guess work because you don't really know how to get the right exposure. I never payed attention to what the camera set as a shutter speed if I was in Av mode and vice-versa.
     
  14. macrumors 6502a

    Erendiox

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2004
    Location:
    Brooklyn NY
    #14
    I second that notion. I'm currently taking a color photo class with a 25 year old camera and Kodak Ektachrome film (Slide Film). It's an all manual class. There's simply no better way to iron out the fundamental skills needed to be a good photographer then to take all the elements into your own hands.
     

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