Many weapons in Iraq are missing, report says

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by IJ Reilly, Oct 31, 2006.

  1. IJ Reilly macrumors P6

    IJ Reilly

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    #1
    http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/world/la-fg-weapons31oct31,1,1929602.story
     
  2. zimv20 macrumors 601

    zimv20

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    #2
    they register only 3% of their own weapons? wtf?

    some time ago, i linked to a chicago tribune (iirc) article detailing how US gangs have infiltrated the military and some of those missing weapons are ending up in chicago and other US cities. then the members come back and train the rest of the gang in tactics.

    and now i find out 97% of those weapons are untraceable! comforting, eh?
     
  3. beatsme macrumors 65816

    beatsme

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  4. Dont Hurt Me macrumors 603

    Dont Hurt Me

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    #4
    I bet whoever is in charge of this gets a Medal from Bush for a job well done. Stay the course ,Stay the course, we can screw the american taxpayer a little more. Stay the Course:rolleyes:
     
  5. takao macrumors 68040

    takao

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    #5
    ridiculous .. only 3% serial numbers noted ? gotta be a joke ... that is military 101 no matter how you turn it ... whenever a gun is handed out it is noted who has the gun currently


    4 % missing ? ouch ... if i think about it that in my unit during my service we actually only used around 10% of all the rifles we had stockpiled ... perhaps even less

    edit:man 4 years and i still remember the serials: first i got GH 750 and then FK 658 which was built before i was born
     
  6. hulugu macrumors 68000

    hulugu

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    #6
    I heard this on NPR yesterday. Wouldn't it be in the best interests of the US military to know whether or not the weapons are going in the right place? How does this happen?

    Iraq is steadily becoming a synonym for CF.
     
  7. mischief macrumors 68030

    mischief

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    #7
    But the NRA says that if we register all the guns to who has them all of the time the Gvt will know who to target first when They declare martial law....:eek:

    We were just insuring that Iraq has the same "well regulated Militia" we have in the 'states.
     
  8. Desertrat macrumors newbie

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    #8
    zimv20, ain't it interesting how the U.s. has changed? After the Civil War, the Confederate soldiers specifically were allowed to take their rifles home. After WW I, returning GIs brought back any old gun they could carry. Lotsa machine guns, as well as rifles and pistols. After WW II, the guys brought back captured firearms (except full-auto) with very little hassle and a minimum of paperwork. E.g., I have the GI Carbine my father carried across Europe in 1944/1945.

    After Desert Storm, soldiers were grudgingly allowed to bring back such pieces as an AK stock, but not the firearms. Nowadays, it's pretty rough on any guy trying to sneak any firearms back into the States.

    Less and less and less trust of the citizenry.

    Funny. In Korea, as an almost-kid, I was entrusted as a squad leader with a halftrack which mounted four 50-caliber machine guns. 2,400 round per minute, had I turned them loose. As an adult citizen, the same government wants me to jump through hoops for pipsqueak guns.

    Interesting squib about the maintenance issue. The pistols, if US military issue, are Beretta 92s. Anybody who knows how to do any maintenance at all doesn't need a shop manual. And worn parts are readily replaced from Beretta of Italy. (But it takes well over 10,000 rounds before there's any concern about worn parts.)

    But the US military has never been concerned about post-combat caretaking. The first time I saw the "parking lot" at Pyote, Texas, in 1952, there were over a thousand warplanes awaiting the scrap people. In the Pacific, thousands of trucks and jeeps and artillery pieces were bulldozed into the ocean.

    The "throwaway society" is larger than you think.

    :), 'Rat
     
  9. clevin macrumors G3

    clevin

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    #9
    dear, in 1952, terrorist won't nuke US, in WW1, it was US citizens who had the weapon, not some other countries insurgent,
    and if you want to live back in that age, remember at that time, there were also segregation, racism, slavery, abortion ban, even earlier, christian crusaders,
    its interesting some people enjoy today's system, while missing the old times system, sorry, world is going forward, and those "good old stuff" might just not fit today's world.
     
  10. pseudobrit macrumors 68040

    pseudobrit

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    #10
    Did you ever for one moment stop and consider how an active combat zone and say, a trip to the mall might represent discrete scenarios?

    Let me attempt to break it down into a standardized test format:

    With no alternative but to give a reckless 18-year-old command of a half-dozen .50 caliber automatic, belt-fed weapons,
    the only prudent environment in which to delegate such destructive power would be (choose one):


    a) His grandmother's funeral
    b) His prom
    c) An active combat zone surrounded by armed, trigger-happy and bloodthirsty communists
    d) Sunday Mass
    e) a Memorial Day picnic
    f) a pheasant hunt with Dick Cheney
    g) his first date
    h) a bank


    Answer: c; half credit for f
     
  11. IJ Reilly thread starter macrumors P6

    IJ Reilly

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  12. pseudobrit macrumors 68040

    pseudobrit

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    #12
    Only if I'd been asking about those pipsqueak guns.
     
  13. Desertrat macrumors newbie

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    #13
    Sorry, clevin, but apples and oranges aren't the same things. I'm talking about the change in the way our government has come to view law-abiding citizens. The TSA is an example of what I'm talking about. You're untrustworthy, in your government's view.

    As far as machine guns and such suchlike, it's just another way to turn money into noise. Just like dragsters and other race cars, or rock music. Different strokes for different folks.

    :), 'Rat
     
  14. clevin macrumors G3

    clevin

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    #14
    its hard, I have to admit im in the middle, I think there is something government need to control, and with the globalization, there are more they need to control, on the other hand, they sometimes over reach, like now. Thats what im saying, Im really not that lefty at all
     
  15. pseudobrit macrumors 68040

    pseudobrit

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    #15
    Except when a drummer goes crazy he doesn't have the arsenal to put down an entire SWAT team. Unless of course he's also into machine guns.
     
  16. Desertrat macrumors newbie

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    #16
    Trouble is, pseudobrit, there are almost no crimes involving the use of full-auto weapons of any sort in the U.S. None at all involving legally-owned machine guns, except one murder of a woman by her cop-husband--and he used a police-department weapon. (The FBI/ATF/DOJ had testified, "None", but some NRA member did find the one instance and reported it. :) This was back in 1986 during hearings over the Firearms Owners Protection Act.)

    The largest mass-murder in US history involved a five-gallon can of gasoline and a crowded nightclub in NYC. Some 75 or 85, don't recall exactly, died. Many others were burned but survived. Don't make a career of picking fly-poop out of pepper with a bunch of "woulda, coulda, shoulda" when there's no existing problem.

    Anyhow, knowing how the miltiary is about paperwork, I'd bet that there is some record, somewhere, about these missing guns in Iraq. It's just buried within tons of other paperwork. Heck, I'd be willing to bet that if you looked long enough, you'd find carbons of requisitions I typed when I was in South Korea in 1954/55! :D Or classified-documents control slips from when I was in Paris, the following tour. Then again, somebody might have done an Oopsie on a Delete key.

    :), 'Rat
     

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